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Volume 47(6); December 2013
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Letter to the Editor
Myxoid Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Central Nervous System
Haeri Han, Sangjeong Ahn, Won Hwangbo, Yang Seok Chae
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):505-506.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.505
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  • 36 Download
  • 1 Citations
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  • Cervical Myxoid Solitary Fibrous Tumor: Report of an Unusual Variant and a Brief Overview of the Literature
    Bingcheng Wu, Sok Yan Tay, Fredrik Petersson
    Head and Neck Pathology.2020; 14(3): 852.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Endogenous Gastric-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells Contribute to Formation of Cancer Stroma and Progression of Gastric Cancer
Eun-Kyung Kim, Hye-Jung Kim, Young-Il Yang, Jong Tae Kim, Min-Young Choi, Chang Soo Choi, Kwang-Hee Kim, Jeong-Han Lee, Won-Hee Jang, Soon-Ho Cheong
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):507-518.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.507
  • 7,099 View
  • 44 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) contribute to carcinogenesis and cancer progression, although their origin and role remain unclear. We recently identified and investigated the in situ identity and implications of gastric submucosa-resident mesenchymal stem cells (GS-MSCs) in the progression of gastric carcinogenesis.

Methods

We isolated GS-MSCs from gastric submucosa using hydrogel-supported organ culture and defined their identity. Isolated cells were assessed in vitro by immunophenotype and mesengenic multipotency. Reciprocal interactions between GS-MSCs and gastric cancer cells were evaluated. To determine the role of GS-MSCs, xenografts were constructed of gastric cancer cells admixed with or without GS-MSCs.

Results

Isolated cells fulfilled MSCs requirements in regard to plastic adherence, stromal cell immunophenotype, and multipotency. We demonstrated a paracrine loop that gastric cancer cells enhanced the migration, proliferation, and differentiation of GS-MSCs; additionally, GS-MSCs promoted the proliferation of gastric cancer cell in vitro. Xenograft experiments showed that GS-MSCs significantly promoted cancer growth and angiogenesis. GS-MSCs that integrated into gastric cancer became not only CAFs but also rarely endothelial cells which contributed to the formation of cellular and vascular cancer stroma.

Conclusions

Endogenous GS-MSCs play an important role in gastric cancer progression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rat Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells (ADSCs) Increases the Glioblastoma Growth and Decreases the Animal Survival
    Isabele Cristiana Iser, Liziane Raquel Beckenkamp, Juliana Hofstatter Azambuja, Francine Luciano Rahmeier, Paula Andreghetto Bracco, Ana Paula Santin Bertoni, Rita de Cássia Sant’Anna Alves, Elizandra Braganhol, Léder Leal Xavier, Marilda da Cruz Fernande
    Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.2022; 18(4): 1495.     CrossRef
  • Mesenchymal/stromal stem cells: necessary factors in tumour progression
    Xinyu Li, Qing Fan, Xueqiang Peng, Shuo Yang, Shibo Wei, Jingang Liu, Liang Yang, Hangyu Li
    Cell Death Discovery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mesenchymal stromal cells in cancer: a review of their immunomodulatory functions and dual effects on tumor progression
    Sabine Galland, Ivan Stamenkovic
    The Journal of Pathology.2020; 250(5): 555.     CrossRef
  • A highly efficient non-viral process for programming mesenchymal stem cells for gene directed enzyme prodrug cancer therapy
    Yoon Khei Ho, Jun Yung Woo, Geraldine Xue En Tu, Lih-Wen Deng, Heng-Phon Too
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fruit-Derived Polysaccharides and Terpenoids: Recent Update on the Gastroprotective Effects and Mechanisms
    Mohammed Safwan Ali Khan, Syeda Umme Kulsoom Khundmiri, Syeda Rukhaiya Khundmiri, Mohammad M. Al-Sanea, Pooi Ling Mok
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastric cancer mesenchymal stem cells derived IL-8 induces PD-L1 expression in gastric cancer cells via STAT3/mTOR-c-Myc signal axis
    Li Sun, Qianqian Wang, Bin Chen, Yuanyuan Zhao, Bo Shen, Hua Wang, Jing Xu, Miaolin Zhu, Xiangdong Zhao, Changgen Xu, Zhihong Chen, Mei Wang, Wenrong Xu, Wei Zhu
    Cell Death & Disease.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sarah M. Ridge, Francis J. Sullivan, Sharon A. Glynn
    Molecular Cancer.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastric cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells prompt gastric cancer progression through secretion of interleukin-8
    Wei Li, Ying Zhou, Jin Yang, Xu Zhang, Huanhuan Zhang, Ting Zhang, Shaolin Zhao, Ping Zheng, Juan Huo, Huiyi Wu
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Nils H. Nicolay, Ramon Lopez Perez, Juergen Debus, Peter E. Huber
    Cancer Letters.2015; 366(2): 133.     CrossRef
A Different Perspective on Macroscopic Sampling of Cholecystectomy Specimens
Asuman Argon, Ayşe Yağcı, Funda Taşlı, Tulu Kebat, Senem Deniz, Nazif Erkan, Gül Kitapçıoğlu, Enver Vardar
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):519-525.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.519
  • 6,215 View
  • 49 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Because there may be interdepartmental differences in macroscopic sampling of cholecystectomy specimens, we aimed to investigate differences between the longitudinal sampling technique and our classical sampling technique in cholecystectomy specimens in which there was no obvious malignancy.

Methods

Six hundred eight cholecystectomy specimens that were collected between 2011 and 2012 were included in this study. The first group included 273 specimens for which one sample was taken from each of the fundus, body, and neck regions (our classical technique). The second group included 335 specimens for which samples taken from the neck region and lengthwise from the fundus toward the neck were placed together in one cassette (longitudinal sampling). The Pearson chi-square, Fisher exact, and ANOVA tests were used and differences were considered significant at p<.05.

Results

In the statistical analysis, although gallbladders in the first group were bigger, the average length of the samples taken in the second group was greater. Inflammatory cells, pyloric metaplasia, intestinal metaplasia, low grade dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma were seen more often in the second group.

Conclusions

In our study, the use of a longitudinal sampling technique enabled us to examine a longer mucosa and to detect more mucosal lesions than did our classical technique. Thus, longitudinal sampling can be an effective technique in detecting preinvasive lesions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Current management of incidental gallbladder cancer: A review
    Claudio F. Feo, Giorgio C. Ginesu, Alessandro Fancellu, Teresa Perra, Chiara Ninniri, Giulia Deiana, Antonio M. Scanu, Alberto Porcu
    International Journal of Surgery.2022; 98: 106234.     CrossRef
  • Accuracy of Right Upper Quadrant Ultrasound in Estimating Gallbladder Wall Thickness
    Lindsay Cefalu, Robert McMurray, Grant Sizemore, Gerald Bieniek, Michael Lustik, Christopher Yheulon
    Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques.2019; 29(1): 26.     CrossRef
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    Newton A C S Wong
    Histopathology.2017; 71(1): 162.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship Between Intracholecystic Papillary-Tubular Neoplasms and Invasive Carcinoma of the Gallbladder
    Asuman Argon, Funda Yılmaz Barbet, Deniz Nart
    International Journal of Surgical Pathology.2016; 24(6): 504.     CrossRef
Prognostic Significance of Absolute Lymphocyte Count/Absolute Monocyte Count Ratio at Diagnosis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma
Su-Jin Shin, Jin Roh, Misung Kim, Min Jung Jung, Young Wha Koh, Chan-Sik Park, Dok Hyun Yoon, Cheolwon Suh, Chan-Jeong Park, Hyun Sook Chi, Jooryung Huh
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):526-533.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.526
  • 9,860 View
  • 62 Download
  • 21 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) in peripheral blood has recently been reported to be an independent prognostic factor in multiple myeloma (MM). Previous studies indicated that the absolute monocyte count (AMC) in peripheral blood reflects the state of the tumor microenvironment in lymphomas. Neither the utility of the AMC nor its relationship with ALC has been studied in MM.

Methods

The prognostic value of ALC, AMC, and the ALC/AMC ratio at the time of diagnosis was retrospectively examined in 189 patients with MM.

Results

On univariate analysis, low ALC (<1,400 cells/µL), high AMC (≥490 cells/µL), and low ALC/AMC ratio (<2.9) were correlated with worse overall survival (OS) (p=.002, p=.038, and p=.001, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the ALC/AMC ratio was an independent prognostic factor (p=.047), whereas ALC and AMC were no longer statistical significant. Low ALC, high AMC, and low ALC/AMC ratio were associated with poor prognostic factors such as high International Staging System stage, plasmablastic morphology, hypoalbuminemia, and high β2-microglobulin.

Conclusions

Univariate analysis demonstrated that changes in ALC, AMC, and the ALC/AMC ratio are associated with patient survival in MM. Multivariate analysis showed that, of these factors, the ALC/AMC ratio was an independent prognostic factor for OS.

Citations

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  • Normal Absolute Monocyte Count in Combination with Normal/High Absolute Lymphocyte Count at the Time of Relapse is Associated with Improved Survival in Patients with Early Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia
    Yu Zhang, Kanchun Dai, Qianying Zhang, Yisha Huang, Yiyun Feng, Deeksha Bhardwaj, Kang Yu, Jianhua Feng
    Cancer Investigation.2021; 39(6-7): 550.     CrossRef
  • Real World Experience of Daratumumab: Evaluating Lymphopenia and Adverse Events in Multiple Myeloma Patients
    Francesca Cottini, Ying Huang, Nita Williams, Naresh Bumma, Abdullah M. Khan, Maria Chaudhry, Srinivas Devarakonda, Yvonne A. Efebera, Don M. Benson, Ashley E. Rosko
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Are the Derived Indexes of Peripheral Whole Blood Cell Counts (NLR, PLR, LMR/MLR) Clinically Significant Prognostic Biomarkers in Multiple Myeloma? A Systematic Review And Meta-Analysis
    Xinwen Zhang, Jialin Duan, Zhenyu Wen, Hao Xiong, Xiaomin Chen, Yang Liu, Kunyu Liao, Chunlan Huang
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Combined immune score of lymphocyte to monocyte ratio and immunoglobulin levels predicts treatment-free survival of multiple myeloma patients after autologous stem cell transplant
    Karen Sweiss, Jonathan Lee, Nadim Mahmud, Gregory S. Calip, Youngmin Park, Dolores Mahmud, Damiano Rondelli, Pritesh R. Patel
    Bone Marrow Transplantation.2020; 55(1): 199.     CrossRef
  • Low absolute CD4+ T cell counts in peripheral blood predict poor prognosis in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma
    Yan Gu, Yuanyuan Jin, Jie Ding, Wu Yujie, Qinglin Shi, Xiaoyan Qu, Sishu Zhao, Jianyong Li, Chen Lijuan
    Leukemia & Lymphoma.2020; 61(8): 1869.     CrossRef
  • Normal Absolute Monocyte Count at the Time of Relapse is Associated with Improved Survival After First Salvage Therapy in Adult Patients with Early Relapsed B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia


    Yi-fen Shi, Na Wang, Zi-yang Huang, Rong-rong Chen, Yi-sha Huang, Yi-yi Zhu, Chong-yun Xing, Bin Liang, Kang Yu, Jian-hua Feng
    Cancer Management and Research.2020; Volume 12: 7097.     CrossRef
  • Effect of absolute monocyte count post-transplant on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant with busulfan and cyclophosphamide conditioning
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    Qian Li, Shuang Gao, Jing Ma, Su Liu, Yuanfang Yue, Lin Chen, Han Li, Xue Wang, Dongying Li, Zeng Cao, Zhigang Zhao, Xiaofang Wang, Yong Yu, Yizhuo Zhang, Yafei Wang
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  • Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte-to-Monocyte Ratio as a Useful Prognostic Factor in Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma
    Ying Tian, Yue Zhang, Wan-Qiu Zhu, Xiao-Lei Chen, He-Bing Zhou, Wen-Ming Chen
    BioMed Research International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • Peripheral blood biomarkers of early immune reconstitution in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma
    Moritz Binder, S. Vincent Rajkumar, Martha Q. Lacy, Morie A. Gertz, Francis K. Buadi, Angela Dispenzieri, Yi L. Hwa, Amie Fonder, Miriam Hobbs, Suzanne R. Hayman, Steven R. Zeldenrust, John A. Lust, Stephen J. Russell, Nelson Leung, Prashant Kapoor, Ronal
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    T Dosani, F Covut, R Beck, J J Driscoll, M de Lima, E Malek
    Blood Cancer Journal.2017; 7(6): e579.     CrossRef
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    Gurshawn Singh, Ammar Nassri, David Kim, Hong Zhu, Zeeshan Ramzan
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics.2017; 8(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Bone marrow microenvironmental CD4 + and CD8 + lymphocyte infiltration patterns define overall- and progression free survival in standard risk multiple myeloma – an analysis from the Austrian Myeloma Registry
    Wolfgang Willenbacher, Ella Willenbacher, Claudia Zelle-Rieser, Rainer Biedermann, Roman Weger, Karin Jöhrer, Andrea Brunner
    Leukemia & Lymphoma.2016; 57(6): 1478.     CrossRef
  • Absolute lymphocyte count as a prognostic marker in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients
    C. Suriu, L. Akria, D. Azoulay, E. Shaoul, M. Barhoum, A. Braester
    International Journal of Laboratory Hematology.2016; 38(3): e56.     CrossRef
  • The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Count Is Associated With Bone Health in Elderly Men
    Xianfeng Lin, Hejun Yu, Chenchen Zhao, Yu Qian, Dun Hong, Kangmao Huang, Jian Mo, An Qin, Xiangqian Fang, Shunwu Fan
    Medicine.2016; 95(15): e3357.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic role of lymphocyte to monocyte ratio for patients with cancer: evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Liangyou Gu, Hongzhao Li, Luyao Chen, Xin Ma, Xintao Li, Yu Gao, Yu Zhang, Yongpeng Xie, Xu Zhang
    Oncotarget.2016; 7(22): 31926.     CrossRef
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    Tamar Tadmor
    Leukemia & Lymphoma.2015; 56(5): 1193.     CrossRef
  • Absolute lymphocyte count is unrelated to overall survival in newly diagnosed elderly patients with multiple myeloma treated with immunomodulatory drugs
    Mariasanta Napolitano, Giorgia Saccullo, Roberto Bono, Antonio Branca, Clotilde Cangialosi, Salvatrice Mancuso, Simona Raso, Gerlando Quintini, Maria Grazia Lipari, Francesco Fabbiano, Giorgina Specchia, Alberto Dolce, Francesco Di Raimondo, Sergio Siragu
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  • Distinct Transcriptional and Anti-Mycobacterial Profiles of Peripheral Blood Monocytes Dependent on the Ratio of Monocytes: Lymphocytes
    Vivek Naranbhai, Helen A. Fletcher, Rachel Tanner, Matthew K. O'Shea, Helen McShane, Benjamin P. Fairfax, Julian C. Knight, Adrian V.S. Hill
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    László Szerafin, János Jakó, Ferenc Riskó
    Orvosi Hetilap.2015; 156(15): 592.     CrossRef
  • The lymphocyte to monocyte ratio in peripheral blood represents a novel prognostic marker in patients with pancreatic cancer
    Michael Stotz, Joanna Szkandera, Tatjana Stojakovic, Julia Seidel, Hellmut Samonigg, Peter Kornprat, Renate Schaberl-Moser, Fridericke Seggewies, Gerald Hoefler, Armin Gerger, Martin Pichler
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Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau, α-Tubulin and βIII-Tubulin Expression in Breast Cancer
Soyoung Im, Changyoung Yoo, Ji-Han Jung, Ye-Won Jeon, Young Jin Suh, Youn Soo Lee, Hyun Joo Choi
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):534-540.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.534
  • 6,132 View
  • 48 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The microtubule-associated protein Tau binds to both inner and outer surfaces of microtubules, leading to tubulin assembly and microtubule stabilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of Tau, α-tubulin, and βIII-tubulin expression in breast carcinoma and to assess their relationships with disease progression in the context of taxane treatment.

Methods

Immunohistochemical expressions of Tau, α-tubulin, and βIII-tubulin were assessed in 183 breast cancer cases. Expression was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters, disease progression and overall survival.

Results

Tau expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis and estrogen receptor (ER) positivity (p=.003 and p<.001, respectively). Loss of α-tubulin was significantly correlated with distant metastasis (p=.034). Loss of βIII-tubulin was correlated with lymph node metastasis and ER positivity (p=.004 and p<.001, respectively). In taxane-treated cases, Tau expression and loss of α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin expression were related to disease progression (p=.001, p=.028, and p=.030, respectively). Tau expression was associated with a worse survival rate in taxane-treated patients (p=.049).

Conclusions

Tau expression and loss of α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin expression were correlated with aggressive behavior in taxane-treated breast cancer. Further evaluation of Tau, α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin may be useful in predicting clinical behavior and seeking therapeutic measures in taxane-based chemotherapy for breast cancer.

Citations

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  • Tubulin Isotypes: Emerging Roles in Defining Cancer Stem Cell Niche
    Tessy Thomas Maliekal, Dhrishya Dharmapal, Suparna Sengupta
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Brittany M. Haynes, Kristen Cunningham, Malathy P. V. Shekhar
    BMC Cancer.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Alena Pastornická, Silvia Rybárová, Slávka Drahošová, Jozef Mihalik, Andrea Kreheľová, Andriana Pavliuk-Karachevtseva, Ingrid Hodorová
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(12): 6363.     CrossRef
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    Tatiana M. Tilli, Cláudio da Silva Castro, Jack A. Tuszynski, Nicolas Carels
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    Chao Lin, Guo-chao Zhao, Ya-dong Xu, Dan-song Wang, Da-yong Jin, Yuan Ji, Wen-hui Lou, Wen-chuan Wu
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    Marie-Laure Caillet-Boudin, Luc Buée, Nicolas Sergeant, Bruno Lefebvre
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Immunohistochemical Classification of Primary and Secondary Glioblastomas
Kyu Sang Lee, Gheeyoung Choe, Kyung Han Nam, An Na Seo, Sumi Yun, Kyung Ju Kim, Hwa Jin Cho, Sung Hye Park
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):541-548.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.541
  • 6,426 View
  • 49 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Glioblastomas may develop de novo (primary glioblastomas, P-GBLs) or through progression from lower-grade astrocytomas (secondary glioblastomas, S-GBLs). The aim of this study was to compare the immunohistochemical classification of glioblastomas with clinically determined P-GBLs and S-GBLs to identify the best combination of antibodies for immunohistochemical classification.

Methods

We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH-1) in 150 glioblastoma cases.

Results

According to clinical history, the glioblastomas analyzed in this study consisted of 146 P-GBLs and 4 S-GBLs. Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR, p53, and IDH-1 was observed in 62.6%, 49.3%, and 11.1%, respectively. Immunohistochemical profiles of EGFR(+)/p53(-), IDH-1(-)/EGFR(+)/p53(-), and EGFR(-)/p53(+) were noted in 41.3%, 40.2%, and 28.7%, respectively. Expression of IDH-1 and EGFR(-)/p53(+) was positively correlated with young age. The typical immunohistochemical features of S-GBLs comprised IDH-1(+)/EGFR(-)/p53(+), and were noted in 3.6% of clinically P-GBLs. The combination of IDH-1(-) or EGFR(+) was the best set of immunohistochemical stains for identifying P-GBLs, whereas the combination of IDH-1(+) and EGFR(-) was best for identifying S-GBLs.

Conclusions

We recommend a combination of IDH-1 and EGFR for immunohistochemical classification of glioblastomas. We expect our results to be useful for determining treatment strategies for glioblastoma patients.

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    Ádám Nagy, Ferenc Garzuly, Gergely Padányi, Iván Szűcs, Ádám Feldmann, Balázs Murnyák, Tibor Hortobágyi, Bernadette Kálmán
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Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Genital Tract: Utility of p16INK4a Expression and HPV DNA Status in its Differential Diagnosis from Extended Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Su Hyun Yoo, Eun-Mi Son, Chang Okh Sung, Kyu-Rae Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):549-556.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.549
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the upper genital tract, including the endometrium, fallopian tubes, and ovaries, is extremely rare. It must be distinguished from the mucosal extension of primary cervical SCC because determination of the primary tumor site is important for tumor staging. However, patients with SCC of the fallopian tubes or ovarian surface have often undergone prior hysterectomy with inadequate examination of the cervix, making it difficult to determine the primary site.

Methods

We compared histologic findings, p16INK4a expression, and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA status in four patients with primary SCC of the upper genital tract and five patients with primary cervical SCC extending to the mucosa of the upper genital tract.

Results

All five SCCs of cervical origin showed strong expression of p16INK4a, whereas all four SCCs of the upper genital tract were negative, although one showed weak focal staining. Three of the five cervical SCCs were positive for HPV16 DNA, whereas all four primary SCCs of the upper genital tract were negative for HPV DNA.

Conclusions

Although a thorough histological examination is important, immunonegativity for p16INK4a and negative for HPV DNA may be useful adjuncts in determining primary SCCs of the upper genital tract.

Citations

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  • PAX8 Positivity, Abnormal p53 Expression, and p16 Negativity in a Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
    Daniela Fanni, Michele Peiretti, Valerio Mais, Elena Massa, Clara Gerosa, Francesca Ledda, Maria Luisa Fais, Gavino Faa, Stefano Angioni
    International Journal of Gynecological Pathology.2022; 41(4): 431.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Analysis of HPV-independent Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma Reveals TP53 and CDKN2A Comutations
    Mark R. Hopkins, Doreen N. Palsgrove, Brigitte M. Ronnett, Russell Vang, Jeffrey Lin, Tricia A. Murdock
    American Journal of Surgical Pathology.2022; 46(12): 1611.     CrossRef
  • Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium—Case report with cytological characteristics in direct and indirect endometrial samples
    Sanda Rajhvajn, Ana Barišić, Lada Škopljanac‐Mačina, Danijela Jurič, Vesna Mahovlić
    Cytopathology.2021; 32(6): 823.     CrossRef
  • Überraschung in der Abradatdiagnostik
    U. Kellner, A. Kellner, U. Cirkel
    Der Pathologe.2015; 36(3): 317.     CrossRef
  • Retropharyngeal Lymph Node Metastasis in 54 Patients with Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Who Underwent Surgery-Based Treatment
    Eun-Jae Chung, Go-Woon Kim, Bum-Ki Cho, Sung-Jin Cho, Dae-Young Yoon, Young-Soo Rho
    Annals of Surgical Oncology.2015; 22(9): 3049.     CrossRef
Renal Histologic Parameters Influencing Postoperative Renal Function in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients
Myoung Ju Koh, Beom Jin Lim, Kyu Hun Choi, Yon Hee Kim, Hyeon Joo Jeong
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):557-562.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.557
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Pre-existing non-neoplastic renal diseases or lesions may influence patient renal function after tumor removal. However, its description is often neglected or omitted in pathologic reports. To determine the incidence and clinical significance of non-neoplastic lesions, we retrospectively examined renal tissues obtained during 85 radical nephrectomies for renal cell carcinoma.

Methods

One paraffin-embedded tissue block from each case containing a sufficient amount of non-tumorous renal parenchyma was cut and processed with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff methods. Non-neoplastic lesions of each histological compartment were semi-quantitatively and quantitatively evaluated.

Results

Among the various histologic lesions found, tubular atrophy, arterial intimal thickening, and glomerulosclerosis were the most common (94.1%, 91.8%, and 88.2%, respectively). Glomerulosclerosis correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate at the time of surgery, as well as at 1- and 5-years post-surgery (p=.0071), but tubulointerstitial fibrosis or arterial fibrous intimal thickening did not. Post-hoc analysis revealed that glomerulosclerosis of more than 20% predicted post-operative renal function. However, its significance disappeared when gender and age were considered.

Conclusions

In conclusion, non-neoplastic lesions, especially with regard to glomerulosclerosis percentage, should be described in pathology reports to provide additional information on renal function decline.

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    Yong Jia, Seyed M.M. Poor, Brenden Dufault, Vivian Lu, Jasmir G. Nayak, Deepak K. Pruthi, Ian W. Gibson
    Human Pathology.2022; 124: 76.     CrossRef
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    Qingqiang Zhu, Wenrong Zhu, Jing Ye, Jingtao Wu, Wenxin Chen, Zhihua Hao
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  • Conventional and Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas and Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in a Nephrectomy
    Firas Al-Delfi, Guillermo A. Herrera
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Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Cytology in Metastatic Tumors: An Analysis of Consecutive CSF Samples
Yoon Sung Bae, June-Won Cheong, Won Seok Chang, Sewha Kim, Eun Ji Oh, Se Hoon Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):563-568.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.563
  • 5,704 View
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  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination can be used to verify the presence of primary malignancies as well as cases of central nervous system (CNS) metastasis. Because of its importance, there have been several studies concerning the sensitivity of CSF cytology. To determine the practical use and reproducibility of diagnoses based on CSF cytology, we evaluated this test by analyzing cytology results from consecutive CSF samples.

Methods

Between July 2010 and June 2013, 385 CSF cytology samples from 42 patients were collected. The samples were gathered using a ventricular catheter and reservoir. CSF cytology of all patients was examined more than two times with immunocytochemistry for cytokeratin.

Results

Primary neoplastic sites and histologic types of patients' metastatic cancer were diverse. The overall sensitivity for detecting malignancy was 41.3%. Even within short-term intervals, diagnoses frequently changed.

Conclusions

Our results were inconsistent, with low sensitivity, when compared to the results of previous studies. However, CSF evaluation can still provide valuable diagnostic and prognostic information because adjuvant treatments are now routinely performed in patients with CNS metastasis. Negative CSF cytology results should not be ignored, and continuous CSF follow-up is essential for following the clinical course of patients with metastatic cancer involving the CNS.

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    Luke N. Ledbetter, John D. Leever
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    Richard Dumbill, Sanja Thompson, Heiko Peschl, GDH Turner, Charles Woodrow
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    M. V. Savostikova, L. Ya. Fomina, E. S. Fedoseeva, E. Yu. Furminskaya
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    Rema Rao, Syed A. Hoda, Alan Marcus, Rana S. Hoda
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    Nozomi IWAMOTO, Mitsuaki ISHIDA, Akiko KAGOTANI, Nozomi KASUGA, Muneo IWAI, Yuji HAYASHI, Namie ARITA, Yoshimitsu MIYAHIRA, Ryoji KUSHIMA
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Case Studies
Development of Six Tumors in a Sebaceus Nevus of Jadassohn: Report of a Case
Serap Gozel, Melahat Donmez, Noyan Can Akdur, Hulya Yikilkan
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):569-574.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.569
  • 6,683 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn is a congenital cutaneous hamartoma comprised of multiple skin structures. It has the potential to develop into variety of neoplasms of various epidermal adnexal origins. While multiple tumors may occasionally arise, it is unusual for more than four tumors to arise simultaneously within a single sebaceus nevus. Here in, we report a case of a 70-year-old woman with six neoplastic proliferations including a syringocystadenoma papilliferum, pigmented trichoblastoma, tubular apocrine adenoma, sebaceoma, tumors of follicular infundibulum and superficial epithelioma with sebaceus differentiation arising in a long standing nevus sebaceus on the scalp. Our case is extraordinary because a single nevus sebaceus contained six neoplastic proliferations with differentiation toward the folliculosebaceous-apocrine unit.

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    Yi-Wen Kuo, Jung-Chia Lin, Wei-Hsuan Tsai
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    Deepthi Shetty, Anilkumar Desai, Niranjan Kumar, Dinesh U.S., Aditya Agnihotri, Saurav Bhaduri
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  • Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum and Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in Nevus Sebaceous
    Jingjing Jiang, Yujuan Chen, Qi He, Jiao Yang, Zhengzhong Zhang, Hao Yang, Huan Zhang, Chuan Yang
    Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology.2022; Volume 15: 2021.     CrossRef
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    Gunja Chowdhury, Meghana Tanwar, Usha Kim, ShanthiR Krishnan
    Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research.2021; 9(3): 123.     CrossRef
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    Anand Bardia, Debajyoti Chatterjee, Keshavamurthy Vinay
    Indian Dermatology Online Journal.2021; 12(4): 577.     CrossRef
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    AngooriG Rao, VangaliS Reddy, M Tejal, M Divya
    Indian Dermatology Online Journal.2020; 11(2): 253.     CrossRef
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    Oumama El Ezzi, Anthony S. de Buys Roessingh, Michèle Bigorre, Guillaume Captier
    International Journal of Dermatology.2018; 57(5): 599.     CrossRef
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    Feifei Wang, Yatong Wu, Zhancai Zheng, Yanping Bai
    Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology.2018; 61(1): 106.     CrossRef
  • Dermoscopic Analysis of Nevus Sebaceus of Jadassohn: A Study of 13 Cases
    Awatef Kelati, Hanane Baybay, Salim Gallouj, Fatima Zahra Mernissi
    Skin Appendage Disorders.2017; 3(2): 83.     CrossRef
  • Secondary neoplasms arising from nevus sebaceus: A retrospective study of 450 cases in Taiwan
    Ming-Chun Hsu, Jau-Yu Liau, Jin-Liern Hong, Yin Cheng, Yi-Hua Liao, Jau-Shiuh Chen, Yi-Shuan Sheen, Jin-Bon Hong
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    Vishwas Parekh, Cesar E. Guerrero, Charles F. Knapp, Craig A. Elmets, Kristopher M. McKay
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  • Trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, desmoplastic trichilemmoma and tumor of the follicular infundibulum with signet-ring cells, all arising in nevus sebaceus
    Emilie Dore, Megan H. Noe, Brian L. Swick
    Journal of Cutaneous Pathology.2015; 42(9): 645.     CrossRef
  • Ceruminous adenoma (ceruminoma) arising in a nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn within the external auditory canal of a 3 year-old boy – A case report
    Elżbieta Niemczyk, Kazimierz Niemczyk, Jadwiga Małdyk, Lidia Zawadzka-Głos
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    V. Behle, H. Hamm
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Human Cutaneous Protothecosis: Report of a Case and Literature Review
Jae Yeon Seok, Yoonho Lee, Hyukmin Lee, Sang Yeop Yi, Hwa Eun Oh, Ji-Sun Song
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):575-578.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.575
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AbstractAbstract PDF

The Prototheca species is achlorophyllic algae and rarely causes human infection. Human protothecosis presents clinically as a cutaneous infection, olecranon bursitis, and disseminated systemic disease. We report a case of human cutaneous protothecosis involving the left wrist. A 68-year-old man presented with an ill-defined erythematous lesion with crust at the dorsal aspect of his left wrist. A punch biopsy was performed to reveal the histologic features of granulomatous inflammation with necrosis at the upper dermis, containing Prototheca organisms, of which, the characteristic features were highlighted by special staining. Through a molecular study, the Prototheca zopfii species was identified.

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    Vasana Jinatham, Diego M. Cantoni, Ian R. Brown, Thanakrit Vichaslip, Picha Suwannahitatorn, Siam Popluechai, Anastasios D. Tsaousis, Eleni Gentekaki
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    Bismillah Mubeen, Aunza Nayab Ansar, Rabia Rasool, Inam Ullah, Syed Sarim Imam, Sultan Alshehri, Mohammed M. Ghoneim, Sami I. Alzarea, Muhammad Shahid Nadeem, Imran Kazmi
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Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Arising in Warthin's Tumor: Case Study and Review of the Literature
Güliz Özkök, Funda Taşlı, Nazan Özsan, Rafet Öztürk, Hakan Postacı
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):579-582.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.579
  • 5,672 View
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  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Warthin's tumor is the second most common type of salivary gland tumor. Microscopically, Warthin's tumor displays a proliferative epithelial component and lymphoid stroma. Carcinomas arising from the epithelial component are well known, but malignant transformations of the lymphoid stroma are rare. When they do occur, they are most commonly B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphomas. A 60-year-old male patient underwent surgical resection of a parotid mass. After superficial parotidectomy, microscopic examination indicated that the tumor was of epithelial components with basaloid and oncocytic columns of cells neighboring lymphoid components. In addition to the lymphoid follicles with distinct germinal centers, there were large, bizarre and extremely atypical neoplastic cells seen in the lymphoid component. Large neoplastic cells were diffusely CD20 and CD30 positive. The patient was diagnosed with "Warthin's tumor and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with expression of CD30." The histopathologic and clinical features are discussed along with a review of the literature.

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    Lester D.R. Thompson, Rumeal D. Whaley
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    Fnu Alnoor, Jatin S. Gandhi, Matthew K. Stein, Joel F. Gradowski
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    F. N. U. Alnoor, Jatin S. Gandhi, Matthew K. Stein, Jorge Solares, Joel F. Gradowski
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    Sang Hoo Park, Min Gyoung Pak, Dong Kun Lee
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    Henrik Hellquist, António Paiva-Correia, Vincent Vander Poorten, Miquel Quer, Juan C. Hernandez-Prera, Simon Andreasen, Peter Zbären, Alena Skalova, Alessandra Rinaldo, Alfio Ferlito
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    Chang-Song Wang, Xia Chu, Di Yang, Lei Ren, Nian-Long Meng, Xue-Xia Lv, Tian Yun, Yan-Sha Cao
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    Hadeel Jawad, Peter McCarthy, Gerard O’Leary, Cynthia C. Heffron
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    Arianna Di Napoli, Giuseppe Mallel, Armando Bartolazzi, Elena Cavalieri, Roberto Becelli, Claudia Cippitelli, Luigi Ruco
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Cystic Benign Phyllodes Tumor in the Inguinal Region
Jai Hyang Go
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):583-586.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.583
  • 6,437 View
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  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The present lesion was the first reported case of a benign intracystic phyllodes tumor in the inguinal region. We report the case of a 51-year-old female patient who presented with an inguinal mass. A clinical diagnosis of malignant lymphoma was considered in this case. The resected tumor was well-circumscribed and showed numerous papillary nodular protrusions into a central cystic cavity (3.5×2.5 cm). The microscopic findings showed hyperplastic epithelium-lined cysts with leaf-like intraluminal epithelium-lined bland stromal projections. The epithelial cell linings were strongly positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors.

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    V.Y. Presas, L.M. Mastronardi, S. Saucedo, E. Rojas Bilbao
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Peritoneal and Nodal Gliomatosis with Endometriosis, Accompanied with Ovarian Immature Teratoma: A Case Study and Literature Review
Na Rae Kim, Soyi Lim, Juhyeon Jeong, Hyun Yee Cho
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):587-591.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.587
  • 6,390 View
  • 60 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Gliomatosis peritonei (GP) indicates the peritoneal implantation of mature neuroglial tissue and is usually accompanied by ovarian mature or immature teratoma. Here, we report a case of ovarian immature teratoma associated with gliomatosis involving the peritoneum, lymph nodes and Douglas' pouch, where gliomatosis coexisted with endometriosis. As far as we know, only seven cases of GP have been reported as coexisting with endometriosis. Eight cases with mature glial tissue in the lymph nodes, i.e., nodal gliomatosis, have been published either in association with GP or in its absence. Metaplasia of pluripotent coelomic stem cells has been suggested to be responsible for the pathogenesis of endometriosis and GP rather than implantation metastases of ovarian teratomatous tumor with varying maturation. This theory is also applied to GP independently of ovarian teratomatous tumors. To the best of our knowledge, nodal gliomatosis coexisting with GP and also involving endometriosis has not yet been reported.

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    Preetha Ramalingam
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Cytomorphological Findings and Histological Correlation of Low-Grade Cribriform Cystadenocarcinoma of Salivary Gland in Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Case Study
Young Sin Ko, Ja Seung Koo
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(6):592-595.   Published online December 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.6.592
  • 6,586 View
  • 53 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma (LGCCC) of the salivary gland is a rare tumor. We report the cytologic features and histologic correlation of a patient with LGCCC. A 57-year-old man had a hardly palpable, nontender mass in the right cheek area followed over nine months. Radiologic analysis revealed a 1.2 cm multiseptated, cystic, solid nodule in an anterior superficial lobe of the right parotid gland. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed many irregular overlapping sheets or clusters of ductal epithelial cells forming solid, pseudopapillary, and cribriform architectures. Nuclei of the tumor cells revealed inconspicuous atypia with minimal size variation. On the basis of these findings, we confirmed a diagnosis of ductal epithelial proliferative lesion, favoring neoplasm, with uncertain malignant potential. Tumor excision was performed, revealing a tiny multicystic nodule (0.7 cm). Histopathologically, this tumor showed the characteristic morphology of LGCCC. This is the first report of cytomorphological findings of LGCCC in Korea.

Citations

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    Lester D. R. Thompson, Justin A. Bishop
    Advances in Anatomic Pathology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Andrea Palicelli
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    Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research.2019; 9(1): 96.     CrossRef
  • The rare entity of cystadenocarcinoma (CAC) in parotid gland: A single-center experience
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    Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery.2019; 47(5): 826.     CrossRef
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  • Unicystic high-grade intraductal carcinoma of the parotid gland: cytological and histological description with clinic-pathologic review of the literature
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    Journal of Oral Science.2016; 58(1): 145.     CrossRef
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    Jong Chul Hong, Tae Kyoung Koh, Min Gyoung Pak, Heon Soo Park
    Korean Journal of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.2016; 59(4): 300.     CrossRef
  • Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of parotid gland
    Atsuko NASU, Sakae HATA, Masaru FUJITA, Toyoko YAMAUCHI, Satoko NAKAMURA, Takehiro TANAKA, Kouichi ICHIMURA, Hiroyuki YANAI
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JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine