Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Articles and issues > Previous issues
13 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 51(2); March 2017
Prev issue Next issue
Review
Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer
Hye Seung Lee, Woo Ho Kim, Yoonjin Kwak, Jiwon Koh, Jeong Mo Bae, Kyoung-Mee Kim, Mee Soo Chang, Hye Seung Han, Joon Mee Kim, Hwal Woong Kim, Hee Kyung Chang, Young Hee Choi, Ji Y. Park, Mi Jin Gu, Min Jin Lhee, Jung Yeon Kim, Hee Sung Kim, Mee-Yon Cho
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):103-121.   Published online February 19, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2017.01.24
  • 16,319 View
  • 862 Download
  • 45 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4). A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Standardized Pathology Report for Gastric Cancer: 2nd Edition
    Young Soo Park, Myeong-Cherl Kook, Baek-hui Kim, Hye Seung Lee, Dong-Wook Kang, Mi-Jin Gu, Ok Ran Shin, Younghee Choi, Wonae Lee, Hyunki Kim, In Hye Song, Kyoung-Mee Kim, Hee Sung Kim, Guhyun Kang, Do Youn Park, So-Young Jin, Joon Mee Kim, Yoon Jung Choi,
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A standardized pathology report for gastric cancer: 2nd edition
    Young Soo Park, Myeong-Cherl Kook, Baek-hui Kim, Hye Seung Lee, Dong-Wook Kang, Mi-Jin Gu, Ok Ran Shin, Younghee Choi, Wonae Lee, Hyunki Kim, In Hye Song, Kyoung-Mee Kim, Hee Sung Kim, Guhyun Kang, Do Youn Park, So-Young Jin, Joon Mee Kim, Yoon Jung Choi,
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2023; 57(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Korean Practice Guidelines for Gastric Cancer 2022: An Evidence-based, Multidisciplinary Approach
    Tae-Han Kim, In-Ho Kim, Seung Joo Kang, Miyoung Choi, Baek-Hui Kim, Bang Wool Eom, Bum Jun Kim, Byung-Hoon Min, Chang In Choi, Cheol Min Shin, Chung Hyun Tae, Chung sik Gong, Dong Jin Kim, Arthur Eung-Hyuck Cho, Eun Jeong Gong, Geum Jong Song, Hyeon-Su Im
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exosomal circ_0001190 Regulates the Progression of Gastric Cancer via miR-586/SOSTDC1 Axis
    Chao Liu, Jing Yang, Fengchi Zhu, Zhiying Zhao, Lixue Gao
    Biochemical Genetics.2022; 60(6): 1895.     CrossRef
  • Optimization of pre‐analytical and analytical steps for DNA and RNA analysis of fresh cytology samples
    Ana Dolinar, Gašper Grubelnik, Irena Srebotnik‐Kirbiš, Margareta Strojan Fležar, Margareta Žlajpah
    Cancer Medicine.2022; 11(21): 4021.     CrossRef
  • Connexin 43 upregulation by dioscin‐inhibited gastric cancer metastasis by suppressing PI3K /Akt pathway
    Yu Kou, Rentao Zhu, Qidi Sun, Zhuoqun Li, Xuan Feng, Hairong Xu
    Food Science & Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Pathology of Gastric Cancer
    Moonsik Kim, An Na Seo
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2022; 22(4): 264.     CrossRef
  • Case report: Undifferentiated sarcoma with multiple tumors involved in Lynch syndrome: Unexpected favorable outcome to sintilimab combined with chemotherapy
    Jiaying Liu, Xiaona Chang, Guixiang Xiao, Jingmin Zhong, Bo Huang, Jiwei Zhang, Beibei Gao, Gang Peng, Xiu Nie
    Frontiers in Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The SUMO E3 ligase CBX4 is identified as a poor prognostic marker of gastric cancer through multipronged OMIC analyses
    Yi Pan, Qingshang Li, Zhijun Cao, Shuliang Zhao
    Genes & Diseases.2021; 8(6): 827.     CrossRef
  • Worldwide variation in lynch syndrome screening: case for universal screening in low colorectal cancer prevalence areas
    George Kunnackal John, Vipin Das Villgran, Christine Caufield-Noll, Francis Giardiello
    Familial Cancer.2021; 20(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Tamoxifen Downregulates the Expression of Notch1 and DLL1 Genes in MKN-45 Gastric Cancer Cells
    Faranak Khanipouyani, Hassan Akrami
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer.2021; 52(3): 922.     CrossRef
  • Kallikrein-11, in Association with Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 25, as a Potential Prognostic Marker for Cholangiocarcinoma with Lymph Node Metastasis
    Saeranee Siriphak, Ravinnipa Chanakankun, Tanakorn Proungvitaya, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Doungdean Tummanatsakun, Wunchana Seubwai, Molin Wongwattanakul, Siriporn Proungvitaya
    Molecules.2021; 26(11): 3105.     CrossRef
  • ISH-based HER2 diagnostics
    Josef Rüschoff, Iris Nagelmeier, Bharat Jasani, Oliver Stoss
    Der Pathologe.2021; 42(S1): 62.     CrossRef
  • Identification and Analysis of Key Genes Driving Gastric Cancer Through Bioinformatics
    Zhao Liu, Shihai Liu, Jing Guo, Libin Sun, Shasha Wang, Yixuan Wang, Wensheng Qiu, Jing Lv
    Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers.2021; 25(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer Liquid Biopsy—Current Updates on Its Potential in Non-Invasive Detection, Prognosis and as a Predictive Marker
    Francis Yew Fu Tieng, Nadiah Abu, Learn-Han Lee, Nurul-Syakima Ab Mutalib
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(3): 544.     CrossRef
  • Metformin attenuates synergic effect of diabetes mellitus and Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric cancer cells proliferation by suppressing PTEN expression
    Huibin Lu, Xinwei Han, Jianzhuang Ren, Kewei Ren, Zongming Li, Quanhui Zhang
    Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.2021; 25(10): 4534.     CrossRef
  • Recent Advances in the Diagnosis, Staging, Treatment, and Prognosis of Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Literature Review
    Zhi-da Chen, Peng-fei Zhang, Hong-qing Xi, Bo Wei, Lin Chen, Yun Tang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tumor immune response and immunotherapy in gastric cancer
    Yoonjin Kwak, An Na Seo, Hee Eun Lee, Hye Seung Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Comparative analysis of HER2 copy number between plasma and tissue samples in gastric cancer using droplet digital PCR
    Boram Kim, Soo Kyung Nam, Soo Hyun Seo, Kyoung Un Park, Sang-Hoon Ahn, Do Joong Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Woo Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differential prognostic impact of CD8+ T cells based on human leucocyte antigen I and PD-L1 expression in microsatellite-unstable gastric cancer
    Yoonjin Kwak, Jiwon Koh, Yujun Park, Yun Ji Hong, Kyoung Un Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Do Joong Park, Sang-Hoon Ahn, Woo Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
    British Journal of Cancer.2020; 122(9): 1399.     CrossRef
  • High-Accuracy Determination of Microsatellite Instability Compatible with Liquid Biopsies
    Amanda Bortolini Silveira, François-Clément Bidard, Amélie Kasperek, Samia Melaabi, Marie-Laure Tanguy, Manuel Rodrigues, Guillaume Bataillon, Luc Cabel, Bruno Buecher, Jean-Yves Pierga, Charlotte Proudhon, Marc-Henri Stern
    Clinical Chemistry.2020; 66(4): 606.     CrossRef
  • Chitosan: A compound for drug delivery system in gastric cancer-a review
    Rana Shafabakhsh, Bahman Yousefi, Zatollah Asemi, Banafsheh Nikfar, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Jamal Hallajzadeh
    Carbohydrate Polymers.2020; 242: 116403.     CrossRef
  • MSI and EBV Positive Gastric Cancer’s Subgroups and Their Link with Novel Immunotherapy
    Maria Grazia Rodriquenz, Giandomenico Roviello, Alberto D’Angelo, Daniele Lavacchi, Franco Roviello, Karol Polom
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2020; 9(5): 1427.     CrossRef
  • Theoretical calculations of molecular descriptors for anticancer activities of 1, 2, 3-triazole-pyrimidine derivatives against gastric cancer cell line (MGC-803): DFT, QSAR and docking approaches
    Rhoda Oyeladun Oyewole, Abel Kolawole Oyebamiji, Banjo Semire
    Heliyon.2020; 6(5): e03926.     CrossRef
  • Identification of a Clinical Cutoff Value for Multiplex KRASG12/G13 Mutation Detection in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Patients Using Digital Droplet PCR, and Comparison with Sanger Sequencing and PNA Clamping Assay
    Kyung Ha Lee, Tae Hee Lee, Min Kyung Choi, In Sun Kwon, Go Eun Bae, Min-Kyung Yeo
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2020; 9(7): 2283.     CrossRef
  • PD-L1 Testing in Gastric Cancer by the Combined Positive Score of the 22C3 PharmDx and SP263 Assay with Clinically Relevant Cut-offs
    Yujun Park, Jiwon Koh, Hee Young Na, Yoonjin Kwak, Keun-Wook Lee, Sang-Hoon Ahn, Do Joong Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2020; 52(3): 661.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Molecular Assessment of Patients with Lynch Syndrome and Sarcomas Underpinning the Association with MSH2 Germline Pathogenic Variants
    Nathália de Angelis de Carvalho, Bianca Naomi Niitsuma, Vanessa Nascimento Kozak, Felipe D’almeida Costa, Mariana Petaccia de Macedo, Bruna Elisa Catin Kupper, Maria Letícia Gobo Silva, Maria Nirvana Formiga, Sahlua Miguel Volc, Samuel Aguiar Junior, Eden
    Cancers.2020; 12(7): 1848.     CrossRef
  • Farnesoid X receptor antagonizes Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal tumorigenesis
    Junhui Yu, Shan Li, Jing Guo, Zhengshui Xu, Jianbao Zheng, Xuejun Sun
    Cell Death & Disease.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • YAP promotes self-renewal of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting expression of L-PTGDS and PTGDR2
    Qingli Bie, Xiaozhe Li, Shiqi Liu, Xiao Yang, Zhenwen Qian, Rou Zhao, Xiaobei Zhang, Bin Zhang
    International Journal of Clinical Oncology.2020; 25(12): 2055.     CrossRef
  • ISH-basierte HER2-Diagnostik
    Josef Rüschoff, Iris Nagelmeier, Bharat Jasani, Oliver Stoss
    Der Pathologe.2020; 41(6): 606.     CrossRef
  • Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin A Suppresses Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis by Regulating the PI3K/AKT Signalling Pathway in Gastric Cancer Cells
    Xinli An, Zekun Wei, Botian Ran, Hao Tian, Hongyu Gu, Yan Liu, Hongjuan Cui, Shunqin Zhu
    Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry.2020; 20(17): 2114.     CrossRef
  • Role of Her-2 in Gastrointestinal Tumours beyond Gastric Cancer: A Tool for Precision Medicine
    Csongor G. Lengyel, Baker Habeeb, Shah Z. Khan, Khalid El Bairi, Sara C. Altuna, Sadaqat Hussain, Syed Ayub Mazher, Dario Trapani, Angelica Petrillo
    Gastrointestinal Disorders.2020; 3(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Next-generation Sequencing in the Management of Gastric and Esophageal Cancers
    Jill C. Rubinstein, Norman G. Nicolson, Nita Ahuja
    Surgical Clinics of North America.2019; 99(3): 511.     CrossRef
  • Molecular profile in Paraguayan colorectal cancer patients, towards to a precision medicine strategy
    Tania Fleitas-Kanonnikoff, Carolina Martinez‐Ciarpaglini, Josefina Ayala, Cinthia Gauna, Rita Denis, Ita Yoffe, Silvia Sforza, María Teresa Martínez, Alicia Pomata, Maider Ibarrola‐Villava, Sipan Arevshatyan, Verónica Burriel, Diego Boscá, Oscar Pastor, A
    Cancer Medicine.2019; 8(6): 3120.     CrossRef
  • Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive digestive tumors
    Anna D. Wagner, Berna C. Özdemir, Josef Rüschoff
    Current Opinion in Oncology.2019; 31(4): 354.     CrossRef
  • Assessing molecular subtypes of gastric cancer: microsatellite unstable and Epstein-Barr virus subtypes. Methods for detection and clinical and pathological implications
    Carolina Martinez-Ciarpaglini, Tania Fleitas-Kanonnikoff, Valentina Gambardella, Marta Llorca, Cristina Mongort, Regina Mengual, Gema Nieto, Lara Navarro, Marisol Huerta, Susana Rosello, Desamparados Roda, Noelia Tarazona, Samuel Navarro, Gloria Ribas, An
    ESMO Open.2019; 4(3): e000470.     CrossRef
  • Current and future molecular diagnostics of gastric cancer
    Rachel Sin-Yu Choi, Wing Yin Xenia Lai, Lok Ting Claire Lee, Wing Lam Christa Wong, Xiao Meng Pei, Hin Fung Tsang, Joel Johnson Leung, William Chi Shing Cho, Man Kee Maggie Chu, Elaine Yue Ling Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar Wong
    Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics.2019; 19(10): 863.     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathologic significance of human leukocyte antigen class I expression in patients with stage II and III gastric cancer
    Yujun Park, Jiwon Koh, Yoonjin Kwak, Sang-Hoon Ahn, Do Joong Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Woo Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
    Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy.2019; 68(11): 1779.     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of an Easy-to-Implement, Practical Algorithm for the Identification of Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer: Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications
    Jiwon Koh, Keun-Wook Lee, Soo Kyung Nam, An Na Seo, Ji-Won Kim, Jin Won Kim, Do Joong Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Woo Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
    The Oncologist.2019; 24(12): e1321.     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms and Therapy for Cancer Metastasis to the Brain
    Federica Franchino, Roberta Rudà, Riccardo Soffietti
    Frontiers in Oncology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Status of programmed death-ligand 1 expression in sarcomas
    Hyung Kyu Park, Mingi Kim, Minjung Sung, Seung Eun Lee, Yu Jin Kim, Yoon-La Choi
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design and synthesis of near-infrared fluorescence-enhancement probes for the cancer-specific enzyme hNQO1
    Changyu Zhang, Bei-Bei Zhai, Tao Peng, Zelin Zhong, Lianbin Xu, Qiang-Zhe Zhang, Lu-Yuan Li, Long Yi, Zhen Xi
    Dyes and Pigments.2017; 143: 245.     CrossRef
  • Progress in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer
    Zheyu Song, Yuanyu Wu, Jiebing Yang, Dingquan Yang, Xuedong Fang
    Tumor Biology.2017; 39(7): 101042831771462.     CrossRef
  • Pathologische Einteilung und Diagnostik des Ösophagus- und Magenkarzinoms
    S. Förster, A. Tannapfel
    Der Gastroenterologe.2017; 12(5): 394.     CrossRef
  • NR4A1-induced increase in the sensitivity of a human gastric cancer line to TNFα-mediated apoptosis is associated with the inhibition of JNK/Parkin-dependent mitophagy
    Hongzhu Yan, Feng Xiao, Jue Zou, Chengmin Qiu, Weiwei Sun, Minmin Gu, Li Zhang
    International Journal of Oncology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Mesothelin Expression in Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Its Relation to Clinical Outcomes
Song-Hee Han, Mee Joo, Hanseong Kim, Sunhee Chang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):122-128.   Published online February 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.11.18
  • 6,365 View
  • 153 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Although surgical resection with chemotherapy is considered effective for patients with advanced gastric cancer, it remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in South Korea. Several studies have reported that mesothelial markers including mesothelin, calretinin, and Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) were positive in variable carcinomas, associated with prognosis, and were evaluated as potential markers for targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of mesothelial markers (mesothelin, calretinin, and WT1) in gastric adenocarcinoma and their relations to clinocopathological features and prognosis. Methods: We evaluated calretinin, WT1, and mesothelin expression by immunohistochemical staining in 117 gastric adenocarcinomas. Results: Mesothelin was positively stained in 30 cases (25.6%). Mesothelin expression was related to increased depth of invasion (p = .002), lymph node metastasis (p = .013), and presence of lymphovascular (p = .015) and perineural invasion (p = .004). Patients with mesothelin expression had significantly worse disease-free survival rate compared with that of nonmesothelin expression group (p = .024). Univariate analysis showed that mesothelin expression is related to short-term survival. None of the 117 gastric adenocarcinomas stained for calretinin or WT1. Conclusions: Mesothelin expression was associated with poor prognosis. Our results suggest that mesothelin-targeted therapy should be considered as an important therapeutic alternative for gastric adenocarcinoma patients with mesothelin expression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Immunotherapy for lung cancer: Focusing on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy
    Tongqing Xue, Xiang Zhao, Kun Zhao, Yan Lu, Juan Yao, Xianguo Ji
    Current Problems in Cancer.2022; 46(1): 100791.     CrossRef
  • Cellular immunotherapy in gastric cancer: adoptive cell therapy and dendritic cell-based vaccination
    Elnaz Faghfuri, Mahdi Abdoli Shadbad, Amir Hossein Faghfouri, Narges Soozangar
    Immunotherapy.2022; 14(6): 475.     CrossRef
  • Mesothelin Expression in Human Tumors: A Tissue Microarray Study on 12,679 Tumors
    Sören Weidemann, Pauline Gagelmann, Natalia Gorbokon, Maximilian Lennartz, Anne Menz, Andreas M. Luebke, Martina Kluth, Claudia Hube-Magg, Niclas C. Blessin, Christoph Fraune, Katharina Möller, Christian Bernreuther, Patrick Lebok, Till S. Clauditz, Frank
    Biomedicines.2021; 9(4): 397.     CrossRef
  • Host Mesothelin Expression Increases Ovarian Cancer Metastasis in the Peritoneal Microenvironment
    Tyvette S. Hilliard, Brooke Kowalski, Kyle Iwamoto, Elizabeth A. Agadi, Yueying Liu, Jing Yang, Marwa Asem, Yuliya Klymenko, Jeff Johnson, Zonggao Shi, Gifty Marfowaa, Madeleine G. Yemc, Phillip Petrasko, M. Sharon Stack
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(22): 12443.     CrossRef
  • CAR-T Cell Therapy—An Overview of Targets in Gastric Cancer
    Dominika Bębnowska, Ewelina Grywalska, Paulina Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej, Barbara Sosnowska-Pasiarska, Jolanta Smok-Kalwat, Marcin Pasiarski, Stanisław Góźdź, Jacek Roliński, Wojciech Polkowski
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2020; 9(6): 1894.     CrossRef
  • Mesothelin-Targeted Recombinant Immunotoxins for Solid Tumors
    Brendan L. Hagerty, Guillaume J. Pegna, Jian Xu, Chin-Hsien Tai, Christine Alewine
    Biomolecules.2020; 10(7): 973.     CrossRef
  • Phase I/II clinical trial of a Wilms’ tumor 1-targeted dendritic cell vaccination-based immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer
    Wen Zhang, Xu Lu, Peilin Cui, Chunmei Piao, Man Xiao, Xuesong Liu, Yue Wang, Xuan Wu, Jingwei Liu, Lin Yang
    Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy.2019; 68(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Mesothelin as a target for cervical cancer therapy
    Korinna Jöhrens, Lea Lazzerini, Jana Barinoff, Jalid Sehouli, Guenter Cichon
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics.2019; 299(1): 211.     CrossRef
  • A targeted proteomics approach reveals a serum protein signature as diagnostic biomarker for resectable gastric cancer
    Qiujin Shen, Karol Polom, Coralie Williams, Felipe Marques Souza de Oliveira, Mariana Guergova-Kuras, Frederique Lisacek, Niclas G. Karlsson, Franco Roviello, Masood Kamali-Moghaddam
    EBioMedicine.2019; 44: 322.     CrossRef
  • Mesothelin as a biomarker for targeted therapy
    Jiang Lv, Peng Li
    Biomarker Research.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antibody drug conjugates under investigation in phase I and phase II clinical trials for gastrointestinal cancer
    Alexis D. Leal, Anuradha Krishnamurthy, Lia Head, Wells A. Messersmith
    Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs.2018; 27(11): 901.     CrossRef
  • Mesothelin‑targeted second generation CAR‑T cells inhibit growth of mesothelin‑expressing tumors in�vivo
    Lin Ye, Yuqing Lou, Liming Lu, Xiaohong Fan
    Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparison of the Mismatch Repair System between Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancers Using Immunohistochemistry
Jiyoon Jung, Youngjin Kang, Yoo Jin Lee, Eojin Kim, Bokyung Ahn, Eunjung Lee, Joo Young Kim, Jeong Hyeon Lee, Youngseok Lee, Chul Hwan Kim, Yang-Seok Chae
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):129-136.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.12.09
  • 8,208 View
  • 295 Download
  • 22 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Approximately 10%–15% of the CRC cases have defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although the high level of microsatellite instability status is a predictor of favorable outcome in primary CRC, little is known about its frequency and importance in secondary CRC. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for MMR proteins (e.g., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) has emerged as a useful technique to complement polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Methods: In this study, comparison between the MMR system of primary CRCs and paired liver and lung metastatic lesions was done using IHC and the correlation with clinical outcomes was also examined. Results: Based on IHC, 7/61 primary tumors (11.4%) showed deficient MMR systems, while 13/61 secondary tumors (21.3%) showed deficiencies. In total, 44 cases showed proficient expression in both the primary and metastatic lesions. Three cases showed deficiencies in both the primary and paired metastatic lesions. In 10 cases, proficient expression was found only in the primary lesions, and not in the corresponding metastatic lesions. In four cases, proficient expression was detected in the secondary tumor, but not in the primary tumor. Conclusions: Although each IHC result and the likely defective genes were not exactly matched between the primary and the metastatic tumors, identical results for primary and metastatic lesions were obtained in 77% of the cases (47/61). These data are in agreement with the previous microsatellite detection studies that used PCR and IHC.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Heterogeneity of Mismatch Repair Status and Microsatellite Instability between Primary Tumour and Metastasis and Its Implications for Immunotherapy in Colorectal Cancers
    Camille Evrard, Stéphane Messina, David Sefrioui, Éric Frouin, Marie-Luce Auriault, Romain Chautard, Aziz Zaanan, Marion Jaffrelot, Christelle De La Fouchardière, Thomas Aparicio, Romain Coriat, Julie Godet, Christine Silvain, Violaine Randrian, Jean-Chri
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4427.     CrossRef
  • MMR profile and microsatellite instability status in colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma with synchronous metastasis: a new clue for the clinical practice
    Paola Parente, Umberto Malapelle, Valentina Angerilli, Mariangela Balistreri, Sara Lonardi, Salvatore Pucciarelli, Caterina De Luca, Francesco Pepe, Gianluca Russo, Elena Vigliar, Angela Danza, Fabio Scaramuzzi, Giancarlo Troncone, Paolo Graziano, Matteo
    Journal of Clinical Pathology.2022; : jclinpath-2022-208143.     CrossRef
  • Histomorphological and molecular genetic characterization of different intratumoral regions and matched metastatic lymph nodes of colorectal cancer with heterogenous mismatch repair protein expression
    Jing Zhang, Xin Zhang, Qian Wang, Yu-yin Xu, Qian-lan Yao, Dan Huang, Wei-qi Sheng, Xiao-li Zhu, Xiao-yan Zhou, Qian-ming Bai
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intraindividual Tumor Heterogeneity of Mismatch Repair Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
    Qianpeng Huang, Tao Yu, Lei Li, Qi Zhang, Shiyao Zhang, Baosong Li, Xiaoping Li, Wanyi Xiao, Gang Liu
    Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patterns of DNA mismatch repair protein expression for primary and recurrent colorectal cancer at an advanced surgical unit: A retrospective audit
    Charles Risbey, Timothy Fielder, Daniel Steffens, Joo‐Shik Shin, Michael Solomon
    Colorectal Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathologic Factors Associated with Mismatch Repair Status Among Filipino Patients with Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer
    Dennis Lee Sacdalan, Reynaldo L Garcia, Michele H Diwa, Danielle Benedict Sacdalan
    Cancer Management and Research.2021; Volume 13: 2105.     CrossRef
  • Recommendations for Specimen and Therapy Selection in Colorectal Cancer
    Snehal B. Patel, Robert Bookstein, Navid Farahani, Myriam Chevarie-Davis, Andy Pao, Angela Aguiluz, Christian Riley, Jennelle C. Hodge, Serhan Alkan, Zhenqui Liu, Nan Deng, Jean R. Lopategui
    Oncology and Therapy.2021; 9(2): 451.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating Mismatch Repair/Microsatellite Instability Status Using Cytology Effusion Specimens to Determine Eligibility for Immunotherapy
    Elizabeth M. Jacobi, Gene Landon, Russell R. Broaddus, Sinchita Roy-Chowdhuri
    Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.2021; 145(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • Médecine de précision et immunoradiothérapie
    C. Chargari, C. Robert, C. Genestie, E. Deutsch
    Cancer/Radiothérapie.2021; 25(6-7): 570.     CrossRef
  • Identificación del fenotipo de inestabilidad microsatelital en carcinoma colorrectal mediante el análisis de la expresión de proteínas reparadoras del ADN: Revisión narrativa
    Orlando Rodas-Pernillo, Edith Oregón
    Ciencia, Tecnologí­a y Salud.2021; 8(2): 232.     CrossRef
  • Japan Society of Clinical Oncology provisional clinical opinion for the diagnosis and use of immunotherapy in patients with deficient DNA mismatch repair tumors, cooperated by Japanese Society of Medical Oncology, First Edition
    Saori Mishima, Hiroya Taniguchi, Kiwamu Akagi, Eishi Baba, Yutaka Fujiwara, Akira Hirasawa, Masafumi Ikeda, Osamu Maeda, Kei Muro, Hiroshi Nishihara, Hiroyki Nishiyama, Tadao Takano, Katsuya Tsuchihara, Yasushi Yatabe, Yasuhiro Kodera, Takayuki Yoshino
    International Journal of Clinical Oncology.2020; 25(2): 217.     CrossRef
  • Microsatellite Stable Colorectal Cancer With an Immunogenic Phenotype: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment
    James Saller, Dahui Qin, Seth Felder, Domenico Coppola
    Clinical Colorectal Cancer.2020; 19(2): 123.     CrossRef
  • Should you repeat mismatch repair testing in cases of tumour recurrence? An evaluation of repeat mismatch repair testing by the use of immunohistochemistry in recurrent tumours of the gastrointestinal and gynaecological tracts
    John J Aird, Michael J Steel, Christine Chow, Julie Ho, Robert Wolber, C Blake Gilks, Lynn N Hoang, David F Schaeffer
    Histopathology.2020; 76(4): 521.     CrossRef
  • Microsatellite instability as a unique characteristic of tumors and a predictor of response to immune therapy
    A.  A. Tryakin, M.  Yu. Fedyanin, A.  S. Tsukanov, Yu.  A. Shelygin, I.  A. Pokataev, E.  O. Ignatova, G.  G. Khakimova, M.  A. Frolova, S.  A. Tjulandin
    Malignant tumours.2020; 9(4): 59.     CrossRef
  • Spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer with high-frequency microsatellite instability: a case report and literature review
    Nozomi Karakuchi, Manabu Shimomura, Kazuhiro Toyota, Takao Hinoi, Hideki Yamamoto, Seiji Sadamoto, Koichi Mandai, Hiroyuki Egi, Hideki Ohdan, Tadateru Takahashi
    World Journal of Surgical Oncology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Biomarker concordance between primary colorectal cancer and its metastases
    D.S. Bhullar, J. Barriuso, S. Mullamitha, M.P. Saunders, S.T. O'Dwyer, O. Aziz
    EBioMedicine.2019; 40: 363.     CrossRef
  • Identification of novel pathogenic MSH2 mutation and new DNA repair genes variants: investigation of a Tunisian Lynch syndrome family with discordant twins
    Amira Jaballah-Gabteni, Haifa Tounsi, Maria Kabbage, Yosr Hamdi, Sahar Elouej, Ines Ben Ayed, Mouna Medhioub, Moufida Mahmoudi, Hamza Dallali, Hamza Yaiche, Nadia Ben Jemii, Afifa Maaloul, Najla Mezghani, Sonia Abdelhak, Lamine Hamzaoui, Mousaddak Azzouz,
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mismatch repair status between primary colorectal tumor and metastatic tumor, a retrospective consistent study
    Zheng Wang, Xiaoli Tang, Xiaoqing Wu, Meiyuan Yang, Daorong Wang
    Bioscience Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Heterogeneity of mismatch repair defect in colorectal cancer and its implications in clinical practice
    Gaelle Tachon, Eric Frouin, Lucie Karayan-Tapon, Marie-Luce Auriault, Julie Godet, Valerie Moulin, Qing Wang, David Tougeron
    European Journal of Cancer.2018; 95: 112.     CrossRef
  • DNA mismatch repair in cancer
    Marina Baretti, Dung T. Le
    Pharmacology & Therapeutics.2018; 189: 45.     CrossRef
  • Discordant loss of mismatch repair proteins in advanced endometrial endometrioid carcinoma compared to paired primary uterine tumors
    Robert M. Ta, Jonathan L. Hecht, Douglas I. Lin
    Gynecologic Oncology.2018; 151(3): 401.     CrossRef
  • The CpG island methylator phenotype is concordant between primary colorectal carcinoma and matched distant metastases
    Stacey A. Cohen, Ming Yu, Kelsey Baker, Mary Redman, Chen Wu, Tai J. Heinzerling, Ralph M. Wirtz, Elpida Charalambous, George Pentheroudakis, Vassiliki Kotoula, Konstantine T. Kalogeras, George Fountzilas, William M. Grady
    Clinical Epigenetics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Current Status of Pathologic Examinations in Korea, 2011–2015, Based on the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service Dataset
Sun-ju Byeon
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):137-147.   Published online February 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.12.30
  • 5,490 View
  • 92 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Pathologic examinations play an important role in medical services. Until recently, the overall status of pathologic examinations in Korea has not been identified. I conducted a nationwide survey of pathologic examination status using the insurance reimbursements (IRs) dataset from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). The aims of this study were to estimate current pathologic examination status in Korea and to provide information for future resource arrangement in the pathology area. Methods: I asked HIRA to provide data on IR requests, including pathologic examinations from 2011 to 2015. Pathologic examination status was investigated according to the following categories: annual statistics, requesting department, type of medical institution, administrative district, and location at which pathologic examinations were performed. Results: Histologic mapping, immunohistochemistry, and cervicovaginal examinations have increased in the last 5 years. Internal medicine, general surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, and urology were the most common medical departments requesting pathologic examinations. The majority of pathologic examinations were frequently performed in tertiary hospitals. About 60.3% of pathologic examinations were requested in medical institutions located in Seoul, Gyeonggi-do, and Busan. More than half of the biopsies and aspiration cytologic examinations were performed using outside services. The mean period between IR requests and 99 percentile IR request completion inspections was 6.2 months. Conclusions: This survey was based on the HIRA dataset, which is one of the largest medical datasets in Korea. The trends of some pathologic examinations were reflected in the policies and needs for detailed diagnosis. The numbers and proportions of pathologic examinations were correlated with the population and medical institutions of the area, as well as patient preference. These data will be helpful for future resource arrangement in the pathology area.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Validation of the pathological prognostic staging system proposed in the revised eighth edition of the AJCC staging manual in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer
    Nuri Jang, Jung Eun Choi, Su Hwan Kang, Young Kyung Bae
    Virchows Archiv.2019; 474(2): 193.     CrossRef
Higher Expression of Toll-like Receptors 3, 7, 8, and 9 in Pityriasis Rosea
Mostafa Abou El-Ela, Mohamed El-Komy, Rania Abdel Hay, Rehab Hegazy, Amin Sharobim, Laila Rashed, Khalda Amr
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):148-151.   Published online February 13, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.09.09
  • 5,748 View
  • 97 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a common papulosquamous skin disease in which an infective agent may be implicated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in immune responses and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. Our aim was to determine the possible roles of TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 in the pathogenesis of PR. Methods: Twenty-four PR patients and 24 healthy individuals (as controls) were included in this case control study. All recruits were subjected to routine laboratory investigations. Biopsies were obtained from one active PR lesion and from healthy skin of controls for the detection of TLR 3, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: This study included 24 patients (8 females and 16 males) with active PR lesions, with a mean age of 28.62 years. Twenty four healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were included as controls (8 females and 16 males, with a mean age of 30.83 years). The results of the routine laboratory tests revealed no significant differences between both groups. Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs were detected in PR patients relative to healthy controls (p < .001). Conclusions: TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 might be involved in the pathogenesis of PR.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pityriasis Rosea: An Updated Review
    Alexander K.C. Leung, Joseph M. Lam, Kin Fon Leong, Kam Lun Hon
    Current Pediatric Reviews.2021; 17(3): 201.     CrossRef
  • Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course low-dose oral prednisolone in pityriasis rosea
    Sidharth Sonthalia, Akshy Kumar, Vijay Zawar, Adity Priya, Pravesh Yadav, Sakshi Srivastava, Atula Gupta
    Journal of Dermatological Treatment.2018; 29(6): 617.     CrossRef
GLUT1 as a Prognostic Factor for Classical Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Correlation with PD-L1 and PD-L2 Expression
Young Wha Koh, Jae-Ho Han, Seong Yong Park, Dok Hyun Yoon, Cheolwon Suh, Jooryung Huh
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):152-158.   Published online February 21, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.11.03
  • 8,158 View
  • 228 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) expression is linked to glucose metabolism and tissue hypoxia. A recent study reported that GLUT1 was significantly associated with programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) as a therapeutic target in relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (cHL). The purpose of this study was to measure the expression of GLUT1 and assess its prognostic significance and potential relationships with PD-L1, programmed death ligand 2 (PD-L2), and programmed death-1 (PD-1) expressions in cHL. Methods: Diagnostic tissues from 125 patients with cHL treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine were evaluated retrospectively via immunohistochemical analysis of GLUT1, PD-L1, PD-L2, and PD-1 expression. Results: The median follow-up time was 4.83 years (range, 0.08 to 17.33 years). GLUT1, PD-L1, PD-L2, and PD-1 were expressed in 44.8%, 63.2%, 9.6%, and 13.6% of the specimens, respectively. Positive correlations were found between GLUT1 and PD-L1 expression (p = .004) and between GLUT1 and PD-L2 expression (p = .031). GLUT1 expression in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells was not associated with overall survival or event-free survival (EFS) in the entire cohort (p = .299 and p = .143, respectively). A subgroup analysis according to the Ann Arbor stage illustrated that GLUT1 expression in HRS cells was associated with better EFS in advanced-stage disease (p = .029). A multivariate analysis identified GLUT1 as a marginally significant prognostic factor for EFS (p = .068). Conclusions: This study suggests that GLUT1 expression is associated with better clinical outcomes in advanced-stage cHL and is significantly associated with PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Peptide-based PROTAC degrader of FOXM1 suppresses cancer and decreases GLUT1 and PD-L1 expression
    Kun Wang, Xiaoyong Dai, Albert Yu, Chunyan Feng, Kewei Liu, Laiqiang Huang
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • TIMP-1 Dependent Modulation of Metabolic Profiles Impacts Chemoresistance in NSCLC
    Wei Xiao, Pankaj Ahluwalia, Lan Wang, John Howard, Ravindra Kolhe, Amyn M. Rojiani, Mumtaz V. Rojiani
    Cells.2022; 11(19): 3036.     CrossRef
  • Hypoxia-related tumor environment correlated with immune infiltration and therapeutic sensitivity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
    Chen Liu, Lin Liu
    Frontiers in Genetics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Non-invasive measurement of PD-L1 status and prediction of immunotherapy response using deep learning of PET/CT images
    Wei Mu, Lei Jiang, Yu Shi, Ilke Tunali, Jhanelle E Gray, Evangelia Katsoulakis, Jie Tian, Robert J Gillies, Matthew B Schabath
    Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer.2021; 9(6): e002118.     CrossRef
  • Tumor immunity is related to 18 F‐FDG uptake in thymic epithelial tumor
    Hisao Imai, Kyoichi Kaira, Kosuke Hashimoto, Hiroyuki Nitanda, Ryo Taguchi, Akitoshi Yanagihara, Tetsuya Umesaki, Ou Yamaguchi, Atsuto Mouri, Tomonori Kawasaki, Masanori Yasuda, Kunihiko Kobayashi, Hirozo Sakaguchi, Ichiei Kuji, Hiroshi Kagamu
    Cancer Medicine.2021; 10(18): 6317.     CrossRef
  • Transcutaneous Carbon Dioxide Decreases Immunosuppressive Factors in Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vivo
    Nanae Yatagai, Takumi Hasegawa, Rika Amano, Izumi Saito, Satomi Arimoto, Daisuke Takeda, Yasumasa Kakei, Masaya Akashi, Peter J. Oefner
    BioMed Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Current Role of Functional Imaging in the Management of Lymphoma
    Bruce D. Cheson, Michel Meignan
    Current Oncology Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET to predict the tumour immune status defined by tumoural PD-L1 and CD8+tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes in oral squamous cell carcinoma
    Maria Togo, Takehiko Yokobori, Kimihiro Shimizu, Tadashi Handa, Kyoichi Kaira, Takaaki Sano, Mariko Tsukagoshi, Tetsuya Higuchi, Satoshi Yokoo, Ken Shirabe, Tetsunari Oyama
    British Journal of Cancer.2020; 122(11): 1686.     CrossRef
  • Role of the tumor microenvironment in PD-L1/PD-1-mediated tumor immune escape
    Xianjie Jiang, Jie Wang, Xiangying Deng, Fang Xiong, Junshang Ge, Bo Xiang, Xu Wu, Jian Ma, Ming Zhou, Xiaoling Li, Yong Li, Guiyuan Li, Wei Xiong, Can Guo, Zhaoyang Zeng
    Molecular Cancer.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake is associated with low tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte levels in patients with small cell lung cancer
    Norimitsu Kasahara, Kyoichi Kaira, Koichi Yamaguchi, Hiroaki Masubuchi, Hiroaki Tsurumaki, Kenichiro Hara, Yasuhiko Koga, Reiko Sakurai, Tetsuya Higuchi, Tadashi Handa, Tetsunari Oyama, Takehiko Yokobori, Kimihiro Shimizu, Takayuki Asao, Takeshi Hisada
    Lung Cancer.2019; 134: 180.     CrossRef
  • MYC Expression and Metabolic Redox Changes in Cancer Cells: A Synergy Able to Induce Chemoresistance
    Barbara Marengo, Ombretta Garbarino, Andrea Speciale, Lorenzo Monteleone, Nicola Traverso, Cinzia Domenicotti
    Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Sustain, Adapt, and Overcome—Hypoxia Associated Changes in the Progression of Lymphatic Neoplasia
    Orsolya Matolay, Gábor Méhes
    Frontiers in Oncology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correlation of tumor-related immunity with 18F-FDG-PET in pulmonary squamous-cell carcinoma
    Norimitsu Kasahara, Kyoichi Kaira, Pinjie Bao, Tetsuya Higuchi, Yukiko Arisaka, Bilguun Erkhem-Ochir, Noriaki Sunaga, Yoichi Ohtaki, Toshiki Yajima, Takayuki Kosaka, Tetsunari Oyama, Takehiko Yokobori, Takayuki Asao, Masahiko Nishiyama, Yoshito Tsushima,
    Lung Cancer.2018; 119: 71.     CrossRef
  • High Serum Level of Soluble Programmed Death Ligand 1 is Associated With a Poor Prognosis in Hodgkin Lymphoma
    Xiaofang Guo, Juan Wang, Jietian Jin, Hao Chen, Zijun Zhen, Wenqi Jiang, Tongyu Lin, Huiqiang Huang, Zhongjun Xia, Xiaofei Sun
    Translational Oncology.2018; 11(3): 779.     CrossRef
  • Hodgkin lymphoma and imaging in the era of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy
    Margarita Kirienko, Martina Sollini, Arturo Chiti
    Clinical and Translational Imaging.2018; 6(6): 417.     CrossRef
  • New developments in the pathology of malignant lymphoma: a review of the literature published from January to April 2017
    J. Han van Krieken
    Journal of Hematopathology.2017; 10(1): 25.     CrossRef
  • Programmed cell death ligands expression in phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas: Relationship with the hypoxic response, immune evasion and malignant behavior
    David J. Pinato, James R. Black, Sebastian Trousil, Roberto E. Dina, Pritesh Trivedi, Francesco A. Mauri, Rohini Sharma
    OncoImmunology.2017; 6(11): e1358332.     CrossRef
Case Studies
A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome
Eun Na Kim, Gu-Hwan Kim, Jiyoon Kim, In Ah Park, Jin Ho Shin, Yun Chai, Kyu-Rae Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):159-164.   Published online August 22, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.07.01
  • 6,904 View
  • 200 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1–7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Gastric-phenotype Mucinous Carcinoma of the Fallopian Tube with Secondary Ovarian Involvement in a Woman with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome: A Case Report
    Mónica Bronte Anaut, Javier Arredondo Montero, Maria Pilar Fernández Seara, Rosa Guarch Troyas
    International Journal of Surgical Pathology.2023; 31(1): 92.     CrossRef
  • Molecular characterization of gastric-type endocervical adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing
    Swati Garg, Teddy S. Nagaria, Blaise Clarke, Orit Freedman, Zanobia Khan, Joerg Schwock, Marcus Q. Bernardini, Amit M. Oza, Kathy Han, Adam C. Smith, Tracy L. Stockley, Marjan Rouzbahman
    Modern Pathology.2019; 32(12): 1823.     CrossRef
  • The developing spectrum of gastric-type cervical glandular lesions
    Karen L. Talia, W. Glenn McCluggage
    Pathology.2018; 50(2): 122.     CrossRef
Thymoma and Synchronous Primary Mediastinal Seminomas with Florid Follicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia in the Anterior Mediastinum: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Hyang-im Lee, In-seok Jang, Kyung Nyeo Jeon, Gyung Hyuck Ko, Jong Sil Lee, Dong Chul Kim, Dae Hyun Song, Jeong-Hee Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):165-170.   Published online February 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.08.24
  • 7,897 View
  • 132 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Thymoma is the most common neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum and has malignant potential. Germ cell tumors (GCTs) found in the anterior mediastinum are usually benign, and malignant GCTs, such as seminomas, are rare. Histologically, mediastinal seminoma is indistinguishable from testicular seminoma except for site-associated morphological features such as lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. Therefore, excluding metastasis is very important. Recently, we treated a young adult patient with multiple thymic masses that occurred simultaneously. The patient underwent a thymectomy for the removal of the mediastinal masses, one of which was diagnosed as type B2 invasive thymoma, and two of which were diagnosed as primary mediastinal seminomas with massive follicular hyperplasia. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a thymoma and a mediastinal seminoma occurring simultaneously in the thymus. We present this case along with a literature review.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Combined Thymic Epithelial Neoplasms – a Review
    Annikka Weissferdt
    International Journal of Surgical Pathology.2022; : 106689692211183.     CrossRef
  • Primary mediastinal seminoma with florid follicular lymphoid hyperplasia: a case report and review of the literature
    Charlotte Holmes, Peh Sun Loo, Sion Barnard
    Diagnostic Pathology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor with Heterologous Rhabdomyosarcomatous Differentiation: A Case Report
Jeong-Hwa Kwon, Joon Seon Song, Hye Won Jung, Jong-Seok Lee, Kyung-Ja Cho
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):171-175.   Published online February 3, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.08.29
  • 6,564 View
  • 110 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Malignant solitary fibrous tumor (MSFT) is a well-described entity, from which heterologous differentiation is extremely rare. We encountered a case of MSFT with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation in a 56-year-old man. This patient presented with a large mass in his posterior thigh. He had been treated with chemoradiation for sarcoma involving the cervical spine, right femoral head, and both lungs 6 months earlier. A wide excision was performed. The mass measured 10.6 cm and showed a fish-flesh cut surface with necrotic foci. Microscopically, the tumor showed heterogeneous cellularity with a hemangiopericytic vascular pattern. A hypercellular area showed spindle cells or epithelioid cells with high mitotic activity (63/10 high-power fields) and immunoreactivity for CD34 and CD99. A hypocellular area and a cystic area showed pleomorphic rhabdoid cells with immunoreactivity for desmin and myogenin. This is a report of a rare case of MSFT with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation and presents new histologic features of MSFT.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Recurrent malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the scalp: a case report and literature review
    Ahmed Rabie, Abdulkarim Hasan, Yasein Mohammed, Ayman Abdelmaksoud, Ali A. Rabaan
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2022; 56(2): 103.     CrossRef
  • Frozen Cytology of Meningeal Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor/Hemangiopericytoma
    Myunghee Kang, Na Rae Kim, Dong Hae Chung, Gie-Taek Yie
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2019; 53(3): 192.     CrossRef
Mucinous Carcinoma with Extensive Signet Ring Cell Differentiation: A Case Report
Hye Min Kim, Eun Kyung Kim, Ja Seung Koo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):176-179.   Published online December 5, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.08.17
  • 8,541 View
  • 151 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Breast cancers that present with mucin include mucinous carcinoma and carcinoma with signet ring cell differentiation. The former shows extracellular mucin and the latter shows abundant intracellular mucin. Here, we report a case of breast cancer showing both extracellular mucin and extensive signet ring cell differentiation due to abundant intracellular mucin. Unlike mucinous carcinoma, this case had the features of high-grade nuclear pleomorphism, high mitotic index, estrogen receptor negativity, progesterone receptor negativity, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positivity, and ductal type with positivity for E-cadherin. In a case with signet ring cell differentiation, differential diagnosis with metastatic signet ring cell carcinoma of the stomach and colon is essential. In this case, the presence of accompanied ductal carcinoma in situ component and mammaglobin and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 positivity were findings that suggested the breast as the origin.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Research on the Histological Features and Pathological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Mucinous Differentiation
    Nian-Long Meng, Yang-kun Wang, Hai-Li Wang, Jun-Ling Zhou, Su-nan Wang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathologic characteristics of HER2-positive pure mucinous carcinoma of the breast
    Yunjeong Jang, Hera Jung, Han-Na Kim, Youjeong Seo, Emad Alsharif, Seok Jin Nam, Seok Won Kim, Jeong Eon Lee, Yeon Hee Park, Eun Yoon Cho, Soo Youn Cho
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(1): 95.     CrossRef
  • Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Mucinous Carcinoma with Signet Ring Cell Differentiation, Which Showed Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
    Yunjeong Jang, Eun Yoon Cho, Soo Youn Cho
    Journal of Breast Cancer.2019; 22(2): 336.     CrossRef
Mucinous Cystadenoma of the Testis: A Case Report with Immunohistochemical Findings
Gilhyang Kim, Dohee Kwon, Hee Young Na, Sehui Kim, Kyung Chul Moon
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):180-184.   Published online February 13, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.08.30
  • 6,663 View
  • 105 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mucinous cystadenoma of the testis is a very rare tumor. Herein, we report a case of mucinous cystadenoma arising in the testis of a 61-year-old man, along with a literature review. Computed tomography showed a 2.5-cm-sized poorly enhancing cystic mass. Grossly, the tumor was a unilocular cystic mass filled with mucinous material and confined to the testicular parenchyma. Histologically, the cyst had a fibrotic wall lined by mucinous columnar epithelium without atypia. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for cytokeratin 20 and CDX2, as well as focally positive for cytokeratin 7. The pathologic diagnosis was mucinous cystadenoma.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Primary Borderline Mucinous Testicular Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review
    Changjuan Hao, Chunsong Kang, Xiaoyan Kang, Zhuanzhuan Yu, Tingting Li, Jiping Xue
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ovarian-type Tumors (Mullerian Tumors) of the Testis: Clinicopathologic Findings with Recent Advances
    Michelle S Lin, Alberto G Ayala, Jae Y Ro
    annals of urologic oncology.2019; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Borderline Mucinous Testicular Tumour: Diagnostic and Management difficulties
    Krishan Pratap, Marlon Perera, Frances Malczewski, Rachel Esler
    BMJ Case Reports.2018; : bcr-2017-223787.     CrossRef
  • Mucinous tumor arising in a giant sacrococcygeal teratoma
    Fengtian Zhang, Xiaolong Yu, Jin Zeng, Min Dai
    Medicine.2017; 96(47): e8759.     CrossRef
Brief Case Reports
Heterotopic Ossification in the Gallbladder
Jihyun Ahn, Sunyoung Kim, Kangseung Kim, Seogjoon Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):185-186.   Published online June 6, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.03.10
  • 6,785 View
  • 94 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Heterotopic ossification within the gallbladder – First reported Australian case
    Jason Russell Laurens, Adam Frankel, Duncan Lambie
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2021; 81: 105787.     CrossRef
  • Case of a Large Pedunculated Biliary Cholesterol Polyp With Osseous Metaplasia
    Ibrahim Abukhiran, Judy Jasser, Ilham Farhat, Sarag Boukhar
    Cureus.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Mucosal Schwann Cell Hamartoma in Colorectal Mucosa: A Rare Benign Lesion That Resembles Gastrointestinal Neuroma
Jiheun Han, Yosep Chong, Tae-Jung Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Chang Suk Kang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(2):187-189.   Published online August 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.07.02
  • 8,977 View
  • 186 Download
  • 10 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multiple non-polypoid mucosal Schwann cell hamartomas presenting as edematous and submucosal tumor-like lesions: a case report
    Takeshi Okamoto, Takaaki Yoshimoto, Katsuyuki Fukuda
    BMC Gastroenterology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mucosal schwann cell hamartoma of the gall bladder
    Kanika Sharma, AnjanKumar Dhua, Prabudh Goel, Vishesh Jain, DevendraKumar Yadav, Prashant Ramteke
    Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons.2021; 26(3): 182.     CrossRef
  • Mucosal Schwann Cell Hamartoma in sigmoid colon – A rare case report and review of literature
    Xiuyan Feng, Hongzhi Xu, Nestor Dela Cruz
    Human Pathology: Case Reports.2020; 19: 200337.     CrossRef
  • Spindle cell proliferations of the sigmoid colon, rectum and anus: a review with emphasis on perineurioma
    Patrice Grech, John B Schofield
    Histopathology.2020; 76(3): 342.     CrossRef
  • Mucosal Schwann cell hamartoma of the gastroesophageal junction: A series of 6 cases and comparison with colorectal counterpart
    Yuan Li, Pouneh Beizai, John W. Russell, Lindsey Westbrook, Arash Nowain, Hanlin L. Wang
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2020; 47: 151531.     CrossRef
  • Mucosal Schwann Cell Hamartoma Presenting as Diffuse Fine Nodularities
    Han Beol Jang, Jong Ok Kim, Sang-Bum Kang
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2020; 76(3): 171.     CrossRef
  • A case of Schwann cell hamartoma of the tongue
    Saya TAKIKAWA, Shigeo TANAKA, Masamichi KOMIYA, Masaaki SUEMITSU, Tadahiko UTSUNOMIYA, Kayo KUYAMA
    Japanese Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2020; 66(12): 601.     CrossRef
  • Hamartoma de células de Schwann mucoso: revisión de una entidad descrita recientemente
    Francisco García-Molina, José Antonio Ruíz-Macia, Joaquin Sola
    Revista Española de Patología.2018; 51(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Neural and neurogenic tumours of the gastroenteropancreaticobiliary tract
    Aoife J McCarthy, Dipti M Karamchandani, Runjan Chetty
    Journal of Clinical Pathology.2018; 71(7): 565.     CrossRef
  • Case of colonic mucosal Schwann cell hamartoma and review of literature on unusual colonic polyps
    JayaKrishna Chintanaboina, Kofi Clarke
    BMJ Case Reports.2018; : bcr-2018-224931.     CrossRef

JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine