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31 "Se Jin Jang"
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Brief Case Report
Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with distinct histopathologic features
Hee Sang Hwang, Jin Woo Song, Se Jin Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2022;56(3):167-169.   Published online May 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2021.03.24
  • 3,237 View
  • 325 Download
PDF
Original Articles
Sarcoma metastasis to the pancreas: experience at a single institution
Miseon Lee, Joon Seon Song, Seung-Mo Hong, Se Jin Jang, Jihun Kim, Ki Byung Song, Jae Hoon Lee, Kyung-Ja Cho
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(3):220-227.   Published online April 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.03.04
  • 4,310 View
  • 136 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Reports of metastatic sarcoma to the pancreas are limited. We reviewed the clinicopathologic characteristics of such cases.
Methods
We reviewed 124 cases of metastatic tumors to the pancreas diagnosed at Asan Medical Center between 2000 and 2017.
Results
Metastatic tumors to the pancreas consisted of 111 carcinomas (89.5%), 12 sarcomas (9.6%), and one melanoma (0.8%). Primary sarcoma sites were bone (n = 4); brain, lung, and soft tissue (n = 2 for each); and the uterus and pulmonary vein (n = 1 for each). Pathologically, the 12 sarcomas comprised 2 World Health Organization grade III solitary fibrous tumors/hemangiopericytomas, and one case each of synovial sarcoma, malignant solitary fibrous tumor, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, osteosarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, intimal sarcoma, myxofibrosarcoma, myxoid liposarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, subtype uncertain, and high-grade spindle-cell sarcoma of uncertain type. The median interval between primary cancer diagnosis and pancreatic metastasis was 28.5 months. One case manifested as a solitary pancreatic osteosarcoma metastasis 15 months prior to detection of osteosarcoma in the femur and was initially misdiagnosed as sarcomatoid carcinoma of the pancreas.
Conclusions
The metastatic sarcoma should remain a differential diagnosis when spindle-cell malignancy is found in the pancreas, even for solitary lesions or in patients without prior history.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Metástasis pancreática de sarcoma, un hallazgo infrecuente
    Daniel Aparicio-López, Jorge Chóliz-Ezquerro, Carlos Hörndler-Algárate, Mario Serradilla-Martín
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • First Recurrence of Synovial Sarcoma Presenting With Solitary Pancreatic Mass
    Raja R Narayan, Greg W Charville, Daniel Delitto, Kristen N Ganjoo
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intravenous Leiomyosarcoma of the Lower Extremity: As Peripheral as It Gets
    Levent F Umur, Selami Cakmak, Mehmet Isyar, Hamdi Tokoz
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Could the burden of pancreatic cancer originate in childhood?
    Smaranda Diaconescu, Georgiana Emmanuela Gîlcă-Blanariu, Silvia Poamaneagra, Otilia Marginean, Gabriela Paduraru, Gabriela Stefanescu
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2021; 27(32): 5322.     CrossRef
  • Staged Surgical Resection of Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma with Synchronous Multiple Pancreatic Metastases: Report of a Rare Case and Review of the Literature
    Panagiotis Dorovinis, Nikolaos Machairas, Stylianos Kykalos, Paraskevas Stamopoulos, George Agrogiannis, Nikolaos Nikiteas, Georgios C. Sotiropoulos
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer.2021; 52(3): 1151.     CrossRef
Interobserver Reproducibility of PD-L1 Biomarker in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Study by 27 Pathologists
Sunhee Chang, Hyung Kyu Park, Yoon-La Choi, Se Jin Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):347-353.   Published online October 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.29
  • 4,651 View
  • 183 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Assessment of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) immunohistochemical staining is used for treatment decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regarding use of PD-L1/programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) immunotherapy. The reliability of the PD-L1 22C3 pharmDx assay is critical in guiding clinical practice. The Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists investigated the interobserver reproducibility of PD-L1 staining with 22C3 pharmDx in NSCLC samples.
Methods
Twenty-seven pathologists individually assessed the tumor proportion score (TPS) for 107 NSCLC samples. Each case was divided into three levels based on TPS: <1%, 1%–49%, and ≥50%.
Results
The intraclass correlation coefficient for TPS was 0.902±0.058. Weighted κ coefficient for 3-step assessment was 0.748±0.093. The κ coefficients for 1% and 50% cut-offs were 0.633 and 0.834, respectively. There was a significant association between interobserver reproducibility and experience (formal PD-L1 training, more experience for PD-L1 assessment, and longer practice duration on surgical pathology), histologic subtype, and specimen type.
Conclusions
Our results indicate that PD-L1 immunohistochemical staining provides a reproducible basis for decisions on anti–PD-1 therapy in NSCLC.

Citations

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  • Artificial intelligence-assisted system for precision diagnosis of PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer
    Jianghua Wu, Changling Liu, Xiaoqing Liu, Wei Sun, Linfeng Li, Nannan Gao, Yajun Zhang, Xin Yang, Junjie Zhang, Haiyue Wang, Xinying Liu, Xiaozheng Huang, Yanhui Zhang, Runfen Cheng, Kaiwen Chi, Luning Mao, Lixin Zhou, Dongmei Lin, Shaoping Ling
    Modern Pathology.2022; 35(3): 403.     CrossRef
  • Immunohistochemistry as predictive and prognostic markers for gastrointestinal malignancies
    Matthew W. Rosenbaum, Raul S. Gonzalez
    Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology.2022; 39(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Cancer: Mechanisms, Biomarkers, and Therapeutic Approaches
    Sangjoon Choi, Sujin Park, Hyunjin Kim, So Young Kang, Soomin Ahn, Kyoung-Mee Kim
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(3): 543.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a supervised deep learning algorithm for automated whole‐slide programmed death‐ligand 1 tumour proportion score assessment in non‐small cell lung cancer
    Liesbeth M Hondelink, Melek Hüyük, Pieter E Postmus, Vincent T H B M Smit, Sami Blom, Jan H Thüsen, Danielle Cohen
    Histopathology.2022; 80(4): 635.     CrossRef
  • 5-hmC loss is another useful tool in addition to BAP1 and MTAP immunostains to distinguish diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma from reactive mesothelial hyperplasia in peritoneal cytology cell-blocks and biopsies
    Ziyad Alsugair, Vahan Kepenekian, Tanguy Fenouil, Olivier Glehen, Laurent Villeneuve, Sylvie Isaac, Juliette Hommell-Fontaine, Nazim Benzerdjeb
    Virchows Archiv.2022; 481(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Artificial intelligence–powered programmed death ligand 1 analyser reduces interobserver variation in tumour proportion score for non–small cell lung cancer with better prediction of immunotherapy response
    Sangjoon Choi, Soo Ick Cho, Minuk Ma, Seonwook Park, Sergio Pereira, Brian Jaehong Aum, Seunghwan Shin, Kyunghyun Paeng, Donggeun Yoo, Wonkyung Jung, Chan-Young Ock, Se-Hoon Lee, Yoon-La Choi, Jin-Haeng Chung, Tony S. Mok, Hyojin Kim, Seokhwi Kim
    European Journal of Cancer.2022; 170: 17.     CrossRef
  • Artificial Intelligence-Assisted Score Analysis for Predicting the Expression of the Immunotherapy Biomarker PD-L1 in Lung Cancer
    Guoping Cheng, Fuchuang Zhang, Yishi Xing, Xingyi Hu, He Zhang, Shiting Chen, Mengdao Li, Chaolong Peng, Guangtai Ding, Dadong Zhang, Peilin Chen, Qingxin Xia, Meijuan Wu
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of artificial intelligence-powered and manual quantification of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression with outcomes in patients treated with nivolumab ± ipilimumab
    Vipul Baxi, George Lee, Chunzhe Duan, Dimple Pandya, Daniel N. Cohen, Robin Edwards, Han Chang, Jun Li, Hunter Elliott, Harsha Pokkalla, Benjamin Glass, Nishant Agrawal, Abhik Lahiri, Dayong Wang, Aditya Khosla, Ilan Wapinski, Andrew Beck, Michael Montalt
    Modern Pathology.2022; 35(11): 1529.     CrossRef
  • High interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility among pathologists assessing PD‐L1 CPS across multiple indications
    Shanthy Nuti, Yiwei Zhang, Nabila Zerrouki, Charlotte Roach, Gudrun Bänfer, George L Kumar, Edward Manna, Rolf Diezko, Kristopher Kersch, Josef Rüschoff, Bharat Jasani
    Histopathology.2022; 81(6): 732.     CrossRef
  • Modifying factors of PD‐L1 expression on tumor cells in advanced non‐small‐cell lung cancer
    Alejandro Avilés‐Salas, Diana Flores‐Estrada, Luis Lara‐Mejía, Rodrigo Catalán, Graciela Cruz‐Rico, Mario Orozco‐Morales, David Heredia, Laura Bolaño‐Guerra, Pamela Denisse Soberanis‐Piña, Edgar Varela‐Santoyo, Andrés F. Cardona, Oscar Arrieta
    Thoracic Cancer.2022; 13(23): 3362.     CrossRef
  • A practical approach for PD-L1 evaluation in gastroesophageal cancer
    Valentina Angerilli, Matteo Fassan, Paola Parente, Irene Gullo, Michela Campora, Chiara Rossi, Maria Luisa Sacramento, Gianmaria Pennelli, Alessandro Vanoli, Federica Grillo, Luca Mastracci
    Pathologica.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparability of laboratory-developed and commercial PD-L1 assays in non-small cell lung carcinoma
    Julia R. Naso, Gang Wang, Norbert Banyi, Fatemeh Derakhshan, Aria Shokoohi, Cheryl Ho, Chen Zhou, Diana N. Ionescu
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2021; 50: 151590.     CrossRef
  • Interobserver agreement in programmed cell death‐ligand 1 immunohistochemistry scoring in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma cytologic specimens
    William Sinclair, Peter Kobalka, Rongqin Ren, Boulos Beshai, Abberly A. Lott Limbach, Lai Wei, Ping Mei, Zaibo Li
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2021; 49(2): 219.     CrossRef
  • Automated PD-L1 Scoring for Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Open-Source Software
    Julia R. Naso, Tetiana Povshedna, Gang Wang, Norbert Banyi, Calum MacAulay, Diana N. Ionescu, Chen Zhou
    Pathology and Oncology Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Immunohistochemical Expression of Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Is Affected by Sample Overfixation
    Angels Barberà, Ruth Marginet Flinch, Montserrat Martin, Jose L. Mate, Albert Oriol, Fina Martínez-Soler, Tomas Santalucia, Pedro L. Fernández
    Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology.2021; 29(1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Programmed cell death-ligand 1 assessment in urothelial carcinoma: prospect and limitation
    Kyu Sang Lee, Gheeyoung Choe
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2021; 55(3): 163.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Semi-Quantitative Scoring and Artificial Intelligence Aided Digital Image Analysis of Chromogenic Immunohistochemistry
    János Bencze, Máté Szarka, Balázs Kóti, Woosung Seo, Tibor G. Hortobágyi, Viktor Bencs, László V. Módis, Tibor Hortobágyi
    Biomolecules.2021; 12(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Immunization against ROS1 by DNA Electroporation Impairs K-Ras-Driven Lung Adenocarcinomas
    Federica Riccardo, Giuseppina Barutello, Angela Petito, Lidia Tarone, Laura Conti, Maddalena Arigoni, Chiara Musiu, Stefania Izzo, Marco Volante, Dario Livio Longo, Irene Fiore Merighi, Mauro Papotti, Federica Cavallo, Elena Quaglino
    Vaccines.2020; 8(2): 166.     CrossRef
  • Utility of PD-L1 testing on non-small cell lung cancer cytology specimens: An institutional experience with interobserver variability analysis
    Oleksandr Kravtsov, Christopher P. Hartley, Yuri Sheinin, Bryan C. Hunt, Juan C. Felix, Tamara Giorgadze
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2020; 48: 151602.     CrossRef
Clinical Utility of a Fully Automated Microsatellite Instability Test with Minimal Hands-on Time
Miseon Lee, Sung-Min Chun, Chang Ohk Sung, Sun Y. Kim, Tae W. Kim, Se Jin Jang, Jihun Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):386-392.   Published online October 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.25
  • 5,650 View
  • 209 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is becoming increasingly important in many types of tumor including colorectal cancer (CRC). The commonly used MSI tests are either time-consuming or labor-intensive. A fully automated MSI test, the Idylla MSI assay, has recently been introduced. However, its diagnostic performance has not been extensively validated in clinical CRC samples.
Methods
We evaluated 133 samples whose MSI status had been rigorously validated by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), clinical nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) cancer panel test, or both. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Idylla MSI assay in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, as well as various sample requirements, such as minimum tumor purity and the quality of paraffin blocks.
Results
Compared with the gold standard results confirmed through both PCR MSI test and NGS, the Idylla MSI assay showed 99.05% accuracy (104/105), 100% sensitivity (11/11), 98.94% specificity (93/94), 91.67% positive predictive value (11/12), and 100% negative predictive value (93/93). In addition, the Idylla MSI assay did not require macro-dissection in most samples and reliably detected MSI-high in samples with approximately 10% tumor purity. The total turnaround time was about 150 minutes and the hands-on time was less than 2 minutes.
Conclusions
The Idylla MSI assay shows good diagnostic performance that is sufficient for its implementation in the clinic to determine the MSI status of at least the CRC samples. In addition, the fully automated procedure requires only a few slices of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and might greatly save time and labor.

Citations

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  • Diagnostic mutationnel rapide Idylla™ : applications théranostiques actuelles et futures
    Amélie Bourhis, Annabelle Remoué, Laura Samaison, Arnaud Uguen
    Annales de Pathologie.2022; 42(4): 329.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Idylla™ MSI assay with the Promega™ MSI Analysis System and immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of endometrial carcinoma: results from an international, multicenter study
    Sonia Gatius, Ana Velasco, Mar Varela, Miriam Cuatrecasas, Pedro Jares, Lisa Setaffy, Benjamin Bonhomme, Almudena Santon, Kristina Lindemann, Sabrina Croce, Ben Davidson, Sigurd Lax, Jose Palacios, Xavier Matias-Guiu
    Virchows Archiv.2022; 480(5): 1031.     CrossRef
  • Integration of rapid PCR testing as an adjunct to NGS in diagnostic pathology services within the UK: evidence from a case series of non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with follow-up
    Alison Finall, Gareth Davies, Trevor Jones, Gwion Emlyn, Pearl Huey, Anna Mullard
    Journal of Clinical Pathology.2022; : jclinpath-2021-207987.     CrossRef
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    Laura Samaison, Arnaud Uguen
    Pathology International.2022; 72(4): 234.     CrossRef
  • Detection of microsatellite instability in a panel of solid tumours with the Idylla MSI Test using extracted DNA
    Adrien Pécriaux, Loetitia Favre, Julien Calderaro, Cécile Charpy, Jonathan Derman, Anaïs Pujals
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    Journal of Clinical Pathology.2021; 74(9): 604.     CrossRef
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    Iiris Ukkola, Pirjo Nummela, Annukka Pasanen, Mia Kero, Anna Lepistö, Soili Kytölä, Ralf Bützow, Ari Ristimäki
    Virchows Archiv.2021; 479(3): 471.     CrossRef
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    Janna Siemanowski, Birgid Schömig-Markiefka, Theresa Buhl, Anja Haak, Udo Siebolts, Wolfgang Dietmaier, Norbert Arens, Nina Pauly, Beyhan Ataseven, Reinhard Büttner, Sabine Merkelbach-Bruse
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  • Evaluation of Micro Satellite Instability and Mismatch Repair Status in Different Solid Tumors: A Multicenter Analysis in a Real World Setting
    Umberto Malapelle, Paola Parente, Francesco Pepe, Caterina De Luca, Pasquale Pisapia, Roberta Sgariglia, Mariantonia Nacchio, Gianluca Gragnano, Gianluca Russo, Floriana Conticelli, Claudio Bellevicine, Elena Vigliar, Antonino Iaccarino, Claudia Covelli,
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  • Novel Biocartis Idylla™ cartridge-based assay for detection of microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer tissues
    Andres E. Mindiola-RomeroMD, Donald C. GreenBS, M. Rabie Al-TurkmaniPhD, Kelley N. GodwinBS, Anna C. MackayBS, Laura J. TafeMD, Bing RenMD, Gregory J. TsongalisPhD
    Experimental and Molecular Pathology.2020; 116: 104519.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of 3 molecular-based assays for microsatellite instability detection in formalin-fixed tissues of patients with endometrial and colorectal cancers
    Pauline Gilson, Julien Levy, Marie Rouyer, Jessica Demange, Marie Husson, Céline Bonnet, Julia Salleron, Agnès Leroux, Jean-Louis Merlin, Alexandre Harlé
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review
Provisional Guideline Recommendation for EGFR Gene Mutation Testing in Liquid Samples of Lung Cancer Patients: A Proposal by the Korean Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group
Dong Hoon Shin, Hyo Sup Shim, Tae Jung Kim, Heae Surng Park, Yun La Choi, Wan Seop Kim, Lucia Kim, Sun Hee Chang, Joon Seon Song, Hyo jin Kim, Jung Ho Han, Chang Hun Lee, Geon Kook Lee, Se Jin Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(3):153-158.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.02.22
  • 5,732 View
  • 234 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Liquid biopsy for detection of mutation from circulating tumor DNA is a new technology which is attractive in that it is non-invasive. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) is an effective first line drug for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who harbor activating EGFR mutation. During the course of treatment, resistance against TKI arises which can be contributed to EGFR T790M mutation in about 50–60% of patients. Third generation TKI may overcome the resistance. In patients who cannot undergo tissue biopsy due to variable reasons, liquid biopsy is an excellent alternative for the detection of EGFR T790M mutation. However, this relatively novel method requires standardization and vigorous quality insurance. Thus, a standard set of guideline recommendations for liquid biopsy for EGFR mutation testing suitable for the Korean medical community is necessary. In this article, we propose a set of provisional guideline recommendations that was discussed and approved by the Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exosomes in Lung Cancer: Actors and Heralds of Tumor Development
    Amaia Sandúa, Estibaliz Alegre, Álvaro González
    Cancers.2021; 13(17): 4330.     CrossRef
  • Molecular biomarker testing for non–small cell lung cancer: consensus statement of the Korean Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group
    Sunhee Chang, Hyo Sup Shim, Tae Jung Kim, Yoon-La Choi, Wan Seop Kim, Dong Hoon Shin, Lucia Kim, Heae Surng Park, Geon Kook Lee, Chang Hun Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2021; 55(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Current status and future perspectives of liquid biopsy in non-small cell lung cancer
    Sunhee Chang, Jae Young Hur, Yoon-La Choi, Chang Hun Lee, Wan Seop Kim
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(3): 204.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of T790M mutation among TKI-therapy resistant Lebanese lung cancer patients based on liquid biopsy analysis: a first report from a major tertiary care center
    Hazem Assi, Arafat Tfayli, Nada Assaf, Sarah Abou Daya, Aram H. Bidikian, Dima Kawsarani, Puzant Fermanian, Ghazi Zaatari, Rami Mahfouz
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Original Articles
Guanabenz Acetate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Cell Death in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells
Hyo Jeong Kang, Hyang Sook Seol, Sang Eun Lee, Young-Ah Suh, Jihun Kim, Se Jin Jang, Eunsil Yu
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(2):94-103.   Published online January 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.01.14
  • 6,082 View
  • 181 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Development of chemotherapeutics for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been lagging. Screening of candidate therapeutic agents by using patient-derived preclinical models may facilitate drug discovery for HCC patients.
Methods
Four primary cultured HCC cells from surgically resected tumor tissues and six HCC cell lines were used for high-throughput screening of 252 drugs from the Prestwick Chemical Library. The efficacy and mechanisms of action of the candidate anti-cancer drug were analyzed via cell viability, cell cycle assays, and western blotting.
Results
Guanabenz acetate, which has been used as an antihypertensive drug, was screened as a candidate anti-cancer agent for HCC through a drug sensitivity assay by using the primary cultured HCC cells and HCC cell lines. Guanabenz acetate reduced HCC cell viability through apoptosis and autophagy. This occurred via inhibition of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34, increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, increased activating transcription factor 4, and cell cycle arrest.
Conclusions
Guanabenz acetate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress–related cell death in HCC and may be repositioned as an anti-cancer therapeutic agent for HCC patients.

Citations

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    Jiacheng Wu, Shan Qiao, Yien Xiang, Menying Cui, Xiaoxiao Yao, Ruixin Lin, Xuewen Zhang
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    Eugenia Licari, Luis Sánchez-del-Campo, Paola Falletta
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    Yusuf A. Haggag, Mohamed Yasser, Murtaza M. Tambuwala, Suleiman S. El Tokhy, Mohammad Isreb, Ahmed A. Donia
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    Cell Death & Disease.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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WITHDRAWN:A Clinicopathologic Study of 220 Cases of Pulmonary Sclerosing Pneumocytoma in Korea: A Nationwide Survey
Myunghee Kang, Seung Yeon Ha, Joung Ho Han, Mee Sook Roh, Se Jin Jang, Hee Jin Lee, Heae Surng Park, Geon Kook Lee, Kyo Young Lee, Jin-Haeng Chung, Yoo Duk Choi, Chang Hun Lee, Lucia Kim, Myoung Ja Chung, Soon Hee Jung, Gou Young Kim, Wan-Seop Kim
Received April 4, 2018  Accepted July 9, 2018  Published online July 16, 2018  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2018.07.10    [Accepted]
  • 4,472 View
  • 63 Download
Reviews
Good Laboratory Standards for Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing Cancer Panel Tests
Jihun Kim, Woong-Yang Park, Nayoung K. D. Kim, Se Jin Jang, Sung-Min Chun, Chang-Ohk Sung, Jene Choi, Young-Hyeh Ko, Yoon-La Choi, Hyo Sup Shim, Jae-Kyung Won
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(3):191-204.   Published online May 10, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2017.03.14
  • 21,573 View
  • 1,026 Download
  • 28 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has recently emerged as an essential component of personalized cancer medicine due to its high throughput and low per-base cost. However, no sufficient guidelines for implementing NGS as a clinical molecular pathology test are established in Korea. To ensure clinical grade quality without inhibiting adoption of NGS, a taskforce team assembled by the Korean Society of Pathologists developed laboratory guidelines for NGS cancer panel testing procedures and requirements for clinical implementation of NGS. This consensus standard proposal consists of two parts: laboratory guidelines and requirements for clinical NGS laboratories. The laboratory guidelines part addressed several important issues across multistep NGS cancer panel tests including choice of gene panel and platform, sample handling, nucleic acid management, sample identity tracking, library preparation, sequencing, analysis and reporting. Requirements for clinical NGS tests were summarized in terms of documentation, validation, quality management, and other required written policies. Together with appropriate pathologist training and international laboratory standards, these laboratory standards would help molecular pathology laboratories to successfully implement NGS cancer panel tests in clinic. In this way, the oncology community would be able to help patients to benefit more from personalized cancer medicine.

Citations

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    Chad M. Vanderbilt, Anita S. Bowman, Sumit Middha, Kseniya Petrova-Drus, Yi-Wei Tang, Xin Chen, Youxiang Wang, Jason Chang, Natasha Rekhtman, Klaus J. Busam, Sounak Gupta, Meera Hameed, Maria E. Arcila, Marc Ladanyi, Michael F. Berger, Snjezana Dogan, Ahm
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Molecular Testing of Lung Cancers
Hyo Sup Shim, Yoon-La Choi, Lucia Kim, Sunhee Chang, Wan-Seop Kim, Mee Sook Roh, Tae-Jung Kim, Seung Yeon Ha, Jin-Haeng Chung, Se Jin Jang, Geon Kook Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2017;51(3):242-254.   Published online April 21, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2017.04.10
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Targeted therapies guided by molecular diagnostics have become a standard treatment of lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are currently used as the best predictive biomarkers for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. Besides EGFR and ALK, the list of druggable genetic alterations has been growing, including ROS1 rearrangements, RET rearrangements, and MET alterations. In this situation, pathologists should carefully manage clinical samples for molecular testing and should do their best to quickly and accurately identify patients who will benefit from precision therapeutics. Here, we grouped molecular biomarkers of lung cancers into three categories—mutations, gene rearrangements, and amplifications—and propose expanded guidelines on molecular testing of lung cancers.

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Original Article
Analysis of Mutations in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene in Korean Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Summary of a Nationwide Survey
Sang Hwa Lee, Wan Seop Kim, Yoo Duk Choi, Jeong Wook Seo, Joung Ho Han, Mi Jin Kim, Lucia Kim, Geon Kook Lee, Chang Hun Lee, Mee Hye Oh, Gou Young Kim, Sun Hee Sung, Kyo Young Lee, Sun Hee Chang, Mee Sook Rho, Han Kyeom Kim, Soon Hee Jung, Se Jin Jang, The Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of Korean Society of Pathologists
J Pathol Transl Med. 2015;49(6):481-488.   Published online October 13, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2015.09.14
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Analysis of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) is important for predicting response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The overall rate of EGFR mutations in Korean patients is variable. To obtain comprehensive data on the status of EGFR mutations in Korean patients with lung cancer, the Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists initiated a nationwide survey. Methods: We obtained 1,753 reports on EGFR mutations in patients with lung cancer from 15 hospitals between January and December 2009. We compared EGFR mutations with patient age, sex, history of smoking, histologic diagnosis, specimen type, procurement site, tumor cell dissection, and laboratory status. Results: The overall EGFR mutation rate was 34.3% in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 43.3% in patients with adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutation rate was significantly higher in women, never smokers, patients with adenocarcinoma, and patients who had undergone excisional biopsy. EGFR mutation rates did not differ with respect to patient age or procurement site among patients with NSCLC. Conclusions: EGFR mutation rates and statuses were similar to those in published data from other East Asian countries.

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Brief Case Report
Adenocarcinoma Arising in Gastric Duplication Cyst
Hyo Jeong Kang, Se Jin Jang, Young Soo Park
Korean J Pathol. 2014;48(2):159-161.   Published online April 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2014.48.2.159
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PDF

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Review & Perspective
Guideline Recommendations for EGFR Mutation Testing in Lung Cancer: Proposal of the Korean Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group
Hyo Sup Shim, Jin-Haeng Chung, Lucia Kim, Sunhee Chang, Wan-Seop Kim, Geon Kook Lee, Soon-Hee Jung, Se Jin Jang
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(2):100-106.   Published online April 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.2.100
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are the strongest predictive factor for response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as gefitinib and erlotinib. EGFR TKIs are approved in Korea as a first-line treatment for lung cancer patients with mutated EGFR. Rapid and accurate EGFR mutation testing is essential for patient selection and establishing targeted therapies with EGFR TKIs. Thus, a standard set of guideline recommendations for EGFR mutation testing suitable for the Korean medical community is necessary. In this article, we propose a set of guideline recommendations for EGFR mutation testing that was discussed and approved by the Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists.

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Original Article
Cytologic Study of Thymoma.
Gu Kong, Se Jin Jang, Jung Dal Lee
Korean J Cytopathol. 1990;1(1):36-42.
  • 1,371 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The fluoroscopy-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy has been gaining widespread acceptance as a rapid and effective method to make a pre-operative diagnosis of mediastinal tumors including thymoma, malignant lymphoma, and metastatic carcinoma. Although thymoma is a most common tumor of the superior mediastinum, most cytopathologists are not experted in cytologic diagnosis of this tumor because of limited experience. In order to define the diagnostic cytologic features of thymoma, we have retrospectively reviewed imprinting smears and corresponding tissue sections from four cases of this tumor. All cases revealed an apparent biphasic pattern of epithelial cell clusters and lymphocytes with occasional branching capillary fronds extending from three dimensional epithelial cell clusters. Epithelial cell clusters predominated in one case and lymphocytes in two cases. Mixed epithelial cell and lymphocyte type represented in one of four cases. In the lymphocyte predominant type, the presence of epithelial cell clusters and small mature lymphocytes are helpful features to differentiate from a malignent lymphoma.
Case Report
Clinicopathologic Analysis of the Liver Explant with Severe Hepatitis A Virus Infection.
Joo Young Kim, Sung Gyu Lee, Shin Hwang, Ji Hoon Kim, Se Jin Jang, Eunsil Yu
Korean J Pathol. 2011;45:S48-S52.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2011.45.S1.S48
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  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The incidence of severe hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection has been increasing. However, clinicopathologic features of severe HAV infection that lead to liver transplantation (LT) have not been reported in Korea. We retrieved 16 LT cases with HAV infection during the last 3 years at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Fifteen cases progressed to hepatic encephalopathy. Thirteen cases survived with or without complications, and three patients died of sepsis. The explanted liver showed massive or zonal necrosis with moderate to severe cholestasis. The zonal distribution of necrosis was frequently associated with endothelialitis of portal and/or central veins. Degenerative changes of hepatocytes were various in degree and distribution. Viral inclusions were suspected in two cases. Although HAV infection is usually confirmed by serological tests, significant venulitis of central and/or portal veins and viral inclusions, which are rarely observed, can suggest an HAV infection as a cause of massive hepatic necrosis of unknown mechanism.
Original Article
Histologic Parameters Predicting Survival of Patients with Multiple Non-small Cell Lung Cancers.
Joo Young Kim, Hee Jin Lee, Jun Kang, Se Jin Jang
Korean J Pathol. 2011;45(5):506-515.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2011.45.5.506
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
In multiple lung cancers (MLCs), distinction between intrapulmonary metastases and multiple primary tumors is important for staging and prognosis. In this study, we have investigated histopathologic prognostic factors of patients with MLCs.
METHODS
Histologic subtype, size differences, lobar location, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), size of the largest tumor, nodal status, number of tumors, morphology of tumor periphery, and immunohistochemical profiles using eight antibodies, were analyzed in 65 patients with MLCs.
RESULTS
There was no significant difference in the survivals of patients with multiple primary tumors and intrapulmonary metastases, as determined by the Martini-Melamed criteria (p=0.654). Risk grouping by four histologic parameters, LVI, margin morphology, size differences, and lobar locations of paired tumors were prognostic. The patients with one or two of aforementioned parameters had significantly longer survival than those with three or four parameters (p=0.017). In patients with largest mass (< or =5 cm), the risk grouping was found to be an independent prognostic factor (p=0.022). However, differences in immunohistochemical staining were not related to patients' survival.
CONCLUSIONS
A risk grouping of MLC patients by using combinations of histologic parameters can be a useful tool in evaluating the survival of patients with MLCs, and may indicate clonal relationship between multiple tumors.

JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine