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Sung Eun Kim 4 Articles
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Kimura's Disease of Parotid Gland: Report of A Case Cytologically Failed to Diagnose as Kimura's Disease.
Se Hoon Kim, Haeryoung Kim, Sung Eun Kim, Woo Ick Yang, Soon Won Hong, Kwang Gil Lee
Korean J Cytopathol. 2003;14(2):86-90.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Kimura's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause and is most prevalent among Asians. The cytologic findings of Kimura's disease are significant numbers of eosinophils in a background of lymphoid cells, occasional fragments of collagenous tissue, proliferation of vessels, and Warthin-Finkeldey polykaryocytes. Among these features, the most important cytologic feature of Kimura's disease is a significant numbers of eosinophils. We experienced a case of Kimura's disease in the parotid gland which we failed to recognize on cytology due to the apparent paucity of eosinophils. On careful retrograde reviewing of the cytologic findings, a few scattered leukocytes, previously interpreted as polymorphous leukocytes, had bilobed nuclei and coarse green but granular cytoplasm on Papanicolaou preparation. These leukocytes showed obvious orange-red intracytoplasmic granules as in eosionophils on Giemsa stain. The paucity of eosinophils may be due to the thick fibrosis around lymphoid follicles or any technical error during aspiration. Whereas the Warthin-Finkeldey type giant cell is not a sensitive cytologic marker of Kimura's disease, it may be a helpful cytologic feature. To reach a correct cytologic diagnosis of Kimura's disease, it is important to keep in mind that searching for Warthin-Finkeldey type giant cells and evaluation of Giemsa stain for detection of eosinophils would be helpful.
Differentiation, Proliferative Index, and Caspase 3 Expression Rate in the Immunohistochemical Stains of Medulloblastoma as Prognostic Factors.
Sung Eun Kim, Woo Ick Yang, Tai Seung Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2001;35(6):536-543.
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AbstractAbstract
BACKGROUND
Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant neuroepithelial tumor of the childhood, less frequently, of adults, located in the posterior cranial fossa. It shows multiple lines of differentiation, expressing neuronal, glial, mesenchymal and ectodermal markers. The prognostic significance of cell differentiation has been studied, but received little agreement. In highly malignant tumors, very high proliferative index has been demonstrated. A major contributor to cell loss in medulloblastoma is reported to be apoptosis. In medulloblstoma, a linear relation between apoptotic index and proliferative index has not been convincingly demonstrated.
METHODS
We analyzed the immunohistochemical features, proliferative indices and apoptotic indices in medulloblastoma patients with regard to their clinical courses. Clinical features of 58 patients with medulloblastoma were reviewed. The presence of glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, vimentin, and epithelial membrane antigen were examined with immunohistochemical method. The proliferative index (Ki-67) and caspase 3 expressing rate were calculated.
RESULTS
There was no significant correlation between the prognosis and the degree of cell differentiation. The positive correlation was noted between proliferative index and apoptotic index in a tumor mass.
CONCLUSIONS
Only proliferative index could be used as a prognostic factor.
Non-cirrhotic Portal Hypertension in Idiopathic Myelofibrosis: A case report.
Sung Eun Kim, Young Nyun Park, Woo Ick Yang, Jin Sup Choi, Chanil Park
Korean J Pathol. 2000;34(5):386-388.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
We report a case of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension in a 73 year-old woman, who had 19-year history of idiopathic myelofibrosis. There were esophageal varix, splenomegaly, and ascites. The biopsied liver showed irregular sinusoidal/ perisinusoidal fibrosis and occasional central-to-central fibrous connection. In areas with extensive fibrosis, coarse collagen fibers filled the sinusoidal spaces and compressed hepatocytes. However, nodular regeneration was absent. Double immunohistochemical stain for smooth muscle actin and proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) revealed diffusely activated stellate cells, some of which showed nuclear PCNA staining. There was also extramedullary hematopoiesis with bizarre megakaryocytes. The portal vein and its branches were patent. Idiopathic myelofibrosis is a rare cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension: the portal hypertension was considered to be the result of sinusoidal/perisinusoidal fibrosis in this case.
Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in Diabetic Nephropathy A report of two cases.
Jae Ho Han, Lucia Kim, Sung Eun Kim, Soon Won Hong, Hyeon Joo Jeong
Korean J Pathol. 1999;33(5):367-370.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by one or a combination of the following lesions: (1) glomerular involvement with three distinctive patterns: diffuse glomerulosclerosis, nodular glomerulosclerosis, and exudative lesions; (2) arteriolo sclerosis; (3) urinary tract bacterial infection with pyelonephritis and sometimes emphysematous pyelonephritis. Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an uncommon life-threatening and acute suppurative infection of the kidney, and usually occurs in diabetic female patients. It is characterized by the production of intraparenchymal gas. Glucose fermentation has been considered the main cause of the gas formation. We presented two illustrative nephrectomy cases of emphysematous pyelonephritis in addition to the typical pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy.

JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine