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HOME > J Pathol Transl Med > Volume 21(4); 1987 > Article
Case Report Spindle and Epithelioid Cell Nevus: Report of four cases.
Hye Ju An, Kyo Young Lee, Sang In Shim, Sun Moo Kim, Jun Young Lee, Baik Kee Cho
Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine 1987;21(4):317-322
DOI: https://doi.org/
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1Department of Clinical Pathology, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul, Korea.
2Department of Dermatology, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul, Korea.

The spindle and epithelioid cell nevus, is known also as Spitz's nevus or benign juvenile melanoma. The histologic picture of the lesion often closely resembles that of a malignant melanoma, but spindle and epithelioid cell nevus hehaves benignly. Criteria for accurate histological diagnosis of this nevus now exist. However, a difficult lesion occasionally brings one to the worrisome situation even now. We experienced four cases (three children and one adult) of spindle and epithelioid cell neveus with nodular or macular skin lesions. In children (7/F, 9/F, 4/M), all of the lesion show a solitary pinkish red or light brown nodular firm masses, 0.7 cm to 1.0 cm in greatest dimension, which are located at the left posterior thigh, posterior neck and right anterior neck region, respectively. In adult (36/F), the lesion shows a light brown, erythematous macule, 0.8 cm in greatest diameter, in the skin of the back. Microscopically, both spindle and epithelioid cells are found in all the four cases, but epithelioid cells predominate in children and spindle cells predominate in adult.

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