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HOME > J Pathol Transl Med > Volume 42(1); 2008 > Article
Case Report Adenocarcinoma Arising from Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in Cervical Esophagus: A Case Report.
Young Ok Hong, Jeong Eun Hwang, In Chul Lee, Jin Hyuk Lee, Seung Il Park, Kyung Ja Cho
Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine 2008;42(1):33-36
DOI: https://doi.org/
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1Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. kjc@amc.seoul.kr
2Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
3Department of Chest Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the upper esophagus, referred as "cervical inlet patch (CIP)", is a benign lesion that is present in 3.8-10% of the adult population. Adenocarcinomas arising from HGM of the upper esophagus are exceedingly rare. The authors report one additional case of histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma arising from a CIP. The patient had concomitant primary adenocarcinoma of the colon. The right hemicolectomy specimen and total esophagectomy specimen after preoperative chemoradiotherapy showed histologically different adenocarcinomas. The residual esophageal tumor was characterized by large mucin pools, fibrous septa, and floating tumor cells. HGM of both the fundic and antral types was seen on the surface and sides of the tumor. The independent origins of the two cancers were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies for cytokeratins 7 and 20. Without further treatment, the patient remained free of disease after 29 months of follow-up.

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