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Volume 46(5); October 2012
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Review
Pathologic Review of Cystic and Cavitary Lung Diseases
Na Rae Kim, Joungho Han
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):407-414.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.407
  • 13,775 View
  • 176 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Pulmonary cystic and cavitary lesions caused by diverse etiologies are commonly encountered in chest imaging. The terms "cyst" and "cavity" are used to describe air-filled regions in the center of a nodule or consolidation of the lung. To date, only radiologic aspects of these lesions have been addressed. The morphologies of pulmonary cystic and cavitary lesions exhibit a broad spectrum, ranging from benign to malignant pulmonary diseases of acquired or congenital origin, including variable infectious diseases. In this review, we summarized the differential diagnosis of pathological entities to provide pathologists and radiologists with an overview of the diseases most commonly associated with pulmonary cystic and cavitary lesions in adults and children. The results showed slightly different patterns in the distribution of the diseases in the two groups. The most common causes of cavitary lesions include malignancy and infection in adults, and congenital malformation in children. Therefore, identification of pathologic entities correlating with the radiologic findings, clinical course, and location of the lesion is important in the evaluation of cystic and cavitary lung lesions in order to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures or delayed treatment.

Citations

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    Joanna E. Kusmirek, Cristopher A. Meyer
    Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.2022; 43(06): 792.     CrossRef
  • Miliary tuberculosis in a paediatric patient with psoriasis
    Jacob Kilgore, Jonathon Pelletier, Bradford Becken, Stephen Kenny, Samrat Das, Lisa Parnell
    BMJ Case Reports.2021; 14(3): e237580.     CrossRef
  • Atypical pulmonary metastases in children: the spectrum of radiologic findings
    Michal Scolnik, Luda Glozman, Ronen Bar-Yoseph, Michal Gur, Yazeed Toukan, Lea Bentur, Anat Ilivitzki
    Pediatric Radiology.2021; 51(10): 1907.     CrossRef
  • Radiographic and CT appearance of cavitary pulmonary lesions in a lamb
    J Kan, J Bauquier, D Tyrrell, K O'Byrne, AW Stent, B Brosnan
    Australian Veterinary Journal.2021; 99(12): 529.     CrossRef
  • Community-acquired Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection presenting as a cavitary lung disease in an immunocompetent patient
    Chan Hee Hwang, Woo Jin Kim, Hye Young Jwa, Sung Heon Song
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(1): 54.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Research of Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Children
    Dong Wang, Lei Cui, Zhi-Gang Li, Li Zhang, Hong-Yun Lian, Hong-Hao Ma, Yun-Ze Zhao, Xiao-Xi Zhao, Tian-You Wang, Rui Zhang
    Chinese Medical Journal.2018; 131(15): 1793.     CrossRef
  • Benign features of infection-related tumor-like lesions of the lung: A retrospective imaging review study
    Chun-Chao Huang, Sho-Ting Hung, Wei-Chin Chang, Chin-Yin Sheu
    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.2017; 61(4): 481.     CrossRef
  • Cavitary lung disease in renal transplant recipients: A single center experience
    Gizem Kumru, Serkan Akturk, Siyar Erdogmus, Aysegul Gursoy Coruh, Acar Tuzuner, Sule Sengul, Kenan Keven
    Transplantation Reports.2017; 2(4): 19.     CrossRef
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    Clinical Radiology.2016; 71(11): 1132.     CrossRef
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    Manabu Hayama, Norio Okamoto, Hidekazu Suzuki, Motohiro Tamiya, Takayuki Shiroyama, Ayako Tanaka, Takuji Nishida, Takashi Nishihara, Nobuko Uehara, Naoko Morishita, Kunimitsu Kawahara, Tomonori Hirashima
    BMC Pulmonary Medicine.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Zarmina Ehsan, Jaimie D. Nathan, Carolyn M. Kercsmar
    Pediatric Pulmonology.2015; 50(12): E52.     CrossRef
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    Tina D. Tailor, Rodney A. Schmidt, Keith D. Eaton, Douglas E. Wood, Sudhakar N. J. Pipavath
    Journal of Thoracic Imaging.2015; 30(5): 308.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Presented as Cavitary Pulmonary Lesions
    Daniel Min, Ji-Hyun Lee, Hye-Cheol Jeong, Jung-Hyun Kim, Suk-Pyo Shin, Hong-Min Kim, Kyu Hyun Han, Hye Yun Jeong, Eun-Kyung Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2014; 76(3): 136.     CrossRef
Original Articles
DPC4 Expression in the Small Intestinal Adenocarcinomas
Sun Jae Lee, Eunsil Yu, Young Kyung Bae, Kee-Taek Jang, Joon Mee Kim, Han-Ik Bae, Seung-Mo Hong, Ghil Suk Yoon
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):415-422.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.415
  • 6,094 View
  • 43 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Small intestinal adenocarcinomas (SACs) are rare malignancies of the alimentary tract with uncertain carcinogenesis.

Methods

We investigated the expression of deleted in pancreatic cancer 4 (DPC4) in 188 cases of surgically resected SACs, using tissue microarray technology.

Results

Twenty-four of the 188 tumors showed complete loss of Smad4/DPC4 expression in cytoplasm (score, 0; 12.8%). Eighty-four and 31 cases were moderately and strongly positive, respectively (score, 2 and 3; 44.7% and 16.5%, respectively) and 49 cases were focally or weakly stained (score, 1; 29.1%). Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the expression of Smad4/DPC4 was related to an increased risk of lymphatic invasion but not to other clinicopathological features of the tumors (tumor location, differentiation, growth pattern, T stage, direct invasion, vascular invasion, and nodal metastasis). There was no significant association between Smad4/DPC4 expression and patient survival.

Conclusions

The present research is the first study to evaluate Smad4/DPC4 expression in a large sample of SACs with clinicopathologic correlation. Future studies should focus on the immunohistochemical and molecular characteristics of SACs to clarify their tumorigenesis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • American Registry of Pathology Expert Opinions: Evaluation of poorly differentiated malignant neoplasms on limited samples - Gastrointestinal mucosal biopsies
    Andrew M. Bellizzi, Elizabeth A. Montgomery, Jason L. Hornick
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2020; 44: 151419.     CrossRef
ERG Immunohistochemistry and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in Korean Prostate Adenocarcinoma Patients
Ja Hee Suh, Jeong-Whan Park, Cheol Lee, Kyung Chul Moon
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):423-428.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.423
  • 7,020 View
  • 33 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Transmembrane protease serine 2-ETS related gene (TMPRSS2-ERG) gene fusion, the most common genetic alternation in prostate cancer, is associated with protein expression of the oncogene ERG. Recently, an immunohistochemical staining method using an anti-ERG antibody was shown to have a strong correlation with altered ERG protein expression.

Methods

We analyzed a total of 303 radical prostatectomy specimens (obtained from Korean prostate cancer cases) using a constructed tissue microarray and ERG immunohistochemical staining. Thereafter, we evaluated the association between ERG expression and clinicopathological factors.

Results

The ERG-positive rate was 24.4% (74/303) and significantly higher ERG expression was observed in the subgroup with a lower Gleason score (p=0.004). Analysis of the histologic pattern of prostate adenocarcinomas revealed that tumors with discrete glandular units (Gleason pattern 3) displayed higher frequency of ERG expression (p=0.016). The ERG-positive rate was lower than that found (approximately 50%) in studies involving western populations. Other factors including age, tumor volume, initial protein-specific antigen level, a pathological stage and margin status were not significantly related with the ERG expression.

Conclusions

ERG immunohistochemical staining is significantly higher in tumors with well-formed glands and is associated with a lower Gleason score.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application and Pitfalls of Immunohistochemistry in Diagnosis of Challenging Genitourinary Cases
    Jenny Ross, Guangyuan Li, Ximing J. Yang
    Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.2020; 144(3): 290.     CrossRef
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    ManarA Abdel-Rahman, HanyO Habashy
    Egyptian Journal of Pathology.2020; 40(2): 212.     CrossRef
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    Ling Nie, Xiuyi Pan, Mengni Zhang, Xiaoxue Yin, Jing Gong, Xueqin Chen, Miao Xu, Qiao Zhou, Ni Chen
    The Prostate.2019; 79(8): 819.     CrossRef
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    Miao Wang, Wei Gao, Dehong Lu, Lianghong Teng
    Pathology & Oncology Research.2018; 24(2): 385.     CrossRef
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    Jason Sedarsky, Michael Degon, Shiv Srivastava, Albert Dobi
    Nature Reviews Urology.2018; 15(2): 125.     CrossRef
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    Arie Carneiro, Álan Roger Gomes Barbosa, Lucas Seiti Takemura, Paulo Priante Kayano, Natasha Kouvaleski Saviano Moran, Carolina Ko Chen, Marcelo Langer Wroclawski, Gustavo Caserta Lemos, Isabela Werneck da Cunha, Marcos Takeo Obara, Marcos Tobias-Machado,
    Frontiers in Oncology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Anan Fathi, Naglaa A. Mostafa, Nabila Hefzi, Khaled A. Mansour
    Egyptian Journal of Pathology.2018; 38(1): 162.     CrossRef
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    Ja Hee Suh, Jeong Hwan Park, Cheol Lee, Kyung Chul Moon
    The Prostate.2017; 77(14): 1438.     CrossRef
  • Diverse Immunoprofile of Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate with an Emphasis on the Prognostic Factors
    Se Un Jeong, Anuja Kashikar Kekatpure, Ja-Min Park, Minkyu Han, Hee Sang Hwang, Hui Jeong Jeong, Heounjeong Go, Yong Mee Cho
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2017; 51(5): 471.     CrossRef
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    Ji-Youn Sung, Hwang Gyun Jeon, Byong Chang Jeong, Seong Il Seo, Seong Soo Jeon, Hyun Moo Lee, Han Yong Choi, So Young Kang, Yoon-La Choi, Ghee Young Kwon
    Journal of Clinical Pathology.2016; 69(7): 586.     CrossRef
  • Prostate Cancer Prognosis Defined by the Combined Analysis of 8q, PTEN and ERG
    Maria P. Silva, João D. Barros-Silva, Elin Ersvær, Wanja Kildal, Tarjei Sveinsgjerd Hveem, Manohar Pradhan, Joana Vieira, Manuel R. Teixeira, Håvard E. Danielsen
    Translational Oncology.2016; 9(6): 575.     CrossRef
  • Overexpression of ERG and Wild-Type PTEN Are Associated with Favorable Clinical Prognosis and Low Biochemical Recurrence in Prostate Cancer
    Sung Han Kim, Soo Hee Kim, Jae Young Joung, Geon Kook Lee, Eun Kyung Hong, Kyung Min Kang, Ami Yu, Byung Ho Nam, Jinsoo Chung, Ho Kyung Seo, Weon Seo Park, Kang Hyun Lee, Rui Medeiros
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  • ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities
    GREGORY M. KELLY, YINK HEAY KONG, ALBERT DOBI, SHIV SRIVASTAVA, ISABELL A. SESTERHENN, RAJADURAI PATHMANATHAN, HUI MENG TAN, SHYH-HAN TAN, SOK CHING CHEONG
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  • ERG positive prostatic cancer may show a more angiogenetic phenotype
    Aleksandra Strzępek, Karolina Kaczmarczyk, Magdalena Białas, Joanna Szpor, Grzegorz Dyduch, Tomasz Szopiński, Piotr Chłosta, Krzysztof Okoń
    Pathology - Research and Practice.2014; 210(12): 897.     CrossRef
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    Daphne Hessels, Jack A. Schalken
    Current Urology Reports.2013; 14(3): 214.     CrossRef
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Expression of MUC1 and MUC4 in Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma
Su-Mi Kim, Sun-Ju Oh, Bang Hur
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):429-435.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.429
  • 7,048 View
  • 47 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Recent reports have indicated that overexpression of mucin (MUC) 1 and/or MUC4 correlates with the occurrence and progression of extra-hepatobiliary malignancy. In this study, we investigated the expression of MUC1 and MUC4 and their prognostic significance in gallbladder adenocarcinoma.

Methods

We examined 54 surgical gallbladder adenocarcinoma samples by immunohistochemistry for MUC1 and MUC4 expression. Staining was evaluated as a sum score of extent and intensity, dividing the samples into low and high expression groups.

Results

The low expression group for both MUC1 and MUC4 was 10 samples (18.5%), and the high expression group was 44 samples (81.5%). High MUC1 expression was significantly correlated with more differentiated tumors (p=0.033), whereas high expression of MUC4 correlated with negative nodal status (p=0.012). Other pathological features were not correlated with MUC expression. Multivariate cox regression analysis showed that neither MUC1 nor MUC4 expression correlated with survival.

Conclusions

Although there were some correlations found, a prognostic role for either MUC1 or MUC4 expression in gallbladder carcinoma was not identified in this study. Further investigation is required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Expression of Mucoproteins in Gallbladder Cancer
    Puneet Kumar, Priyesh Shukla, Soni Kumari, Ruhi Dixit, Gopeshwar Narayan, V. K. Dixit, A. K. Khanna
    Indian Journal of Surgery.2022; 84(3): 456.     CrossRef
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    Chao Li, Tao Liu, Libin Yin, Didi Zuo, Yuyang Lin, Lei Wang
    Medicine.2019; 98(9): e14659.     CrossRef
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    Feng Xu, Fuquan Liu, Hongwei Zhao, Guangyu An, Guosheng Feng
    Medicine.2015; 94(50): e2286.     CrossRef
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    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(8): e105094.     CrossRef
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    Mairéad G. McNamara, Cristiane Metran-Nascente, Jennifer J. Knox
    Current Opinion in Oncology.2013; 25(4): 425.     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathological and Prognostic Significance of MUC-2, MUC-4 and MUC-5AC Expression in Japanese Gastric Carcinomas
    Li-Jun Xiao, Shuang Zhao, En-Hong Zhao, Xin Zheng, Wen-Feng Gou, Ya-Nan Xing, Yasuo Takano, Hua-Chuan Zheng
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(12): 6447.     CrossRef
A Proposal for Creating a Guideline for Cancer Registration of the Fibromatosis, PEComa Group, Malignant Lymphoma In Situ and Dendritic Cell Tumors (III)
Changyoung Yoo, Chang Suk Kang, Yoon La Choi, Hye Yoon Kang, Jin Man Kim, Young Hye Koh, Joo Hee Lee, Seung Sook Lee, In Sun Kim, Dong Hoon Kim, Yong Ku Park, Jin Hee Sohn
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):436-442.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.436
  • 7,404 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Understanding the biologic behavior of a tumor is a prerequisite for tumor registration code assignment. The aim of this report was to propose appropriate behavior codes of the International Classification of Disease Oncology 3 (ICD-O3) to rare, yet pathologically interesting hematopoietic and soft tissue tumors.

Methods

The Study Group for Hematopathology, the Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology Study Group, and the Cancer Registration Committee prepared the questionnaire containing provisional behavior codes of selected diseases.

Results

In situ lesions of mantle cell and follicular lymphomas, dendritic cell tumors, and neoplasms with perivascular epithelioid cell differentiation (PEComa), not otherwise specified were classified as malignant (-/3). The fibromatosis group, with the exception of lipofibromatosis, was proposed as benign (-/0). Lipofibromatosis and several diseases that belong to the PEComa group were proposed as uncertain malignant potential (-/1). For the hematologic and soft tissue tumors, 274 and 288 members of the Korean Society of Pathologists, respectively, provided opinions through questionnaire, and most responders showed agreement with the provisional behavior code proposed.

Conclusions

The determination of behavior codes for the rare diseases described in this study, especially those of the PEComa group or malignant lymphoma, could be viewed as impractical and premature, but this study provides the basis for future research on this topic.

Update on the Proposal for Creating a Guideline for Cancer Registration of the Gastrointestinal Tumors (I-2)
Eun Sun Jung, Yun Kyung Kang, Mee-Yon Cho, Joon Mee Kim, Won Ae Lee, Hee Eun Lee, Sunhoo Park, Jin Hee Sohn, So-Young Jin
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):443-453.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.443
  • 8,314 View
  • 147 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Cancer registries play a fundamental role in cancer control and multicenter collaborative research. Recently, the need for reassessment of cancer registry criteria has arisen due to the newly released 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Accordingly, development of new coding guidelines for cancer is necessary to improve the quality of cancer registries, as well as to prevent conflicts that may arise when seeking medical insurance compensation.

Methods

With funding from the Management Center for Health Promotion, 35 members of the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group and the Cancer Registration Committee of the Korean Society of Pathologists (KSP) participated in a second workshop for gastrointestinal tumor registration in Korea.

Results

The topics of gastric epithelial tumor, colonic intramucosal carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor (NET), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and appendiceal mucinous tumor were discussed for new coding guidelines. A survey was then conducted among 208 members of the KSP for a consensus of the guidelines proposed in the workshop.

Conclusions

Although a few issues were set aside for further discussion, such as coding for non-gastric GIST and some types of NET, the members agreed upon most of the proposed guidelines. Therefore, we suggest using the newly revised International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, 3rd edition (ICD-O-3) coding guidelines for registering gastrointestinal tumors in Korea.

Citations

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    Yun Kyung Kang
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Expression of Cortactin and Focal Adhesion Kinase in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Correlation with Clinicopathologic Parameters and Their Prognostic Implication
Yo Na Kim, Ji Eun Choi, Jun Sang Bae, Kyu Yun Jang, Myoung Ja Chung, Woo Sung Moon, Myoung Jae Kang, Dong Geun Lee, Ho Sung Park
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):454-462.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.454
  • 6,631 View
  • 36 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Cortactin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are two important components among actin cross-linking proteins that play a central role in cell migration.

Methods

The aims of this study were to evaluate the expression of cortactin and FAK in normal colorectal mucosa and colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) using tissue microarray of 2 mm cores to correlate their expression with other clinicopathological factors and, investigate their prognostic significance.

Results

Twenty (9%) and 24 cases (11%) of normal colorectal mucosa were immunoreactive for cortactin and FAK. In addition, 184 (84%) and 133 cases (61%) of CRCs were immunoreactive for cortactin and FAK, respectively. Cortactin expression was associated with histologic differentiation and FAK expression. Cortactin, but not FAK expression was also correlated with poor overall and relapse-free survival and served well as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival.

Conclusions

Cortactin expression, in association with FAK expression, may plays an important role in tumor progression. Furthermore, it may also be a satisfactory biomarker to predict tumor progression and survival in CRC patients.

Citations

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    Konrad Steinestel, Eva Wardelmann, Wolfgang Hartmann, Inga Grünewald
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Expression of CHOP in Squamous Tumor of the Uterine Cervix
Hyun Hee Chu, Jun Sang Bae, Kyoung Min Kim, Ho Sung Park, Dong Hyu Cho, Kyu Yun Jang, Woo Sung Moon, Myoung Jae Kang, Dong Geun Lee, Myoung Ja Chung
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):463-469.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.463
  • 6,854 View
  • 37 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and abnormal p53 expression are closely involved in carcinogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) of uterine cervix. Recent studies have suggested that virus-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress modulates various cell survival and cell death signaling pathways. The C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) is associated with ER stress-mediated apoptosis and is also involved in carcinogenesis of several human cancers. We hypothesized that CHOP is involved in the carcinogenesis of uterine cervical cancer in association with HR-HPV and/or p53.

Methods

Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze CHOP and p53 protein expression of tissue sections from 191 patients with invasive cancer or preinvasive lesions of the uterine cervix (61 cases of SqCC, 66 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] III, and 64 cases of CIN I).

Results

CHOP was expressed in 59.4% of CIN I, 48.5% of CIN III, and 70.5% of SqCC cases. It was also significantly more frequent in invasive SqCC than in preinvasive lesions (p=0.042). Moreover, CHOP expression significantly correlated with HR-HPV infection and p53 expression (p=0.009 and p=0.038, respectively).

Conclusions

Our results suggest that CHOP is involved in the carcinogenesis of the uterine cervix SqCC via association with HR-HPV and p53.

Citations

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  • Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology
    Elif Guzel, Sefa Arlier, Ozlem Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Mehmet Tabak, Tugba Ekiz, Nihan Semerci, Kellie Larsen, Frederick Schatz, Charles Lockwood, Umit Kayisli
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    Qiao Qiao, Chaonan Sun, Chuyang Han, Ning Han, Miao Zhang, Guang Li
    Cancer Science.2017; 108(7): 1421.     CrossRef
  • Curcumin induces ER stress-mediated apoptosis through selective generation of reactive oxygen species in cervical cancer cells
    Boyun Kim, Hee Seung Kim, Eun-Ji Jung, Jung Yun Lee, Benjamin K. Tsang, Jeong Mook Lim, Yong Sang Song
    Molecular Carcinogenesis.2016; 55(5): 918.     CrossRef
  • Down-regulation of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: Their relationship with clinicopathological parameters and prognostic significance
    Xiao-Juan Zhu, She-Gan Gao, San-Qiang Li, Zhen-Guo Shi, Zhi-Kun Ma, Shan-Shan Zhu, Xiao-Shan Feng
    Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology.2015; 39(3): 391.     CrossRef
  • MG289 in <i>Mycoplasma genitalium</i> Enhances Microbial Invasion and Bacterial Persistence in Benign Human Prostate Cells
    Wasia Rizwani, Leticia Reyes, Jeongsoon Kim, Steve Goodison, Charles J. Rosser
    Open Journal of Urology.2013; 03(06): 232.     CrossRef
Clinicopathologic Implication of Ezrin Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
Ho Won Lee, Eui Han Kim, Mee-Hye Oh
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):470-477.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.470
  • 7,503 View
  • 25 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Ezrin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family, is implicated in tumor progression, metastatic dissemination, and adverse outcomes, in several cancer types. In this study, we explored the clinicopathological significance of ezrin expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs).

Methods

Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray with 112 surgically resected NSCLC specimens, was performed to examine the ezrin expression. We also correlated ezrin expression with other clinicopathological features and prognosis.

Results

The ezrin-positive group revealed significantly higher correlation with pleural invasion (p=0.016) and pathologic stage (p=0.050). Univariate survival analysis showed that ezrin-positive group had a significantly shorter cancer-specific survival than ezrin-negative group (p=0.016). Meanwhile, female (p=0.030), no pleural invasion (p=0.023), no lymphatic invasion (p=0.026), and early pathologic stage (p=0.008) significantly correlated with longer survival. Multivariate survival analysis showed that variables such as ezrin positivity (p=0.032), female (p=0.035), and early pathologic stage (p=0.001) were independent prognostic factors for NSCLC.

Conclusions

Ezrin might be a molecular marker to predict poor prognosis of NSCLC.

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    Jean Carlos Lipreri da Silva, Hugo Passos Vicari, João Agostinho Machado-Neto
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    José Miguel Pardo-Sánchez, Nuria Mancheño, José Cerón, Carlos Jordá, Emilio Ansotegui, Óscar Juan, Sarai Palanca, Antonio Cremades, Carolina Gandía, Rosa Farràs
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    Si-Hyong Jang, Ji-Hye Lee, Hyun Ju Lee, Hyundeuk Cho, Hyein Ahn, In Hag Song, Mee-Hye Oh
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    Jianwei Li, Kuanhai Wei, Hailang Yu, Dan Jin, Gang Wang, Bin Yu
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    Qi-Hong Jiang, Ai-Xiang Wang, Yan Chen
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    Yisila Mu, Haoshaqiang Zhang, Lixin Che, Kun Li
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    Tiefeng Jin, Jingchun Jin, Xiangyu Li, Songnan Zhang, Yun Ho Choi, Yingshi Piao, Xionghu Shen, Zhenhua Lin
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Case Reports
Ghost Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma Arising from Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor: A Case Report
Zhi-Yu Zhu, Zhi-Gang Chu, Yu Chen, Wei-Ping Zhang, Di Lv, Ning Geng, Ming-Zhong Yang
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):478-482.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.478
  • 7,094 View
  • 48 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is an exceptionally rare and malignant odontogenic tumor with aggressive growth characteristics. We describe a case of GCOC which was considerably derived from a previously resected calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). Cellular atypia, mitotic activity, Ki-67 labeling index and matrix metalloprotease-9 positive expression rate were all increased in the currently resected specimen compared to the initial one. This is a rare case of malignant transformation of CCOT to GCOC with respect to its histopathological and immunohistochemical findings.

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    Hiroshi Harada, Mitsuo P. Sato, Naoki Otsuki, Mao Kawamura, Akira Kurose, Takao Satou
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    Danielle Castex Conde, Gustavo de Souza Vieira, Pâmella de Pinho Montovani, João Pedro Roque Beserra, Mauro César Gaspar Ribeiro, Rafaela Elvira Rozza-de-Menezes, Karin Soares Cunha
    Oral Oncology.2022; 124: 105524.     CrossRef
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    Gustavo de Souza Vieira, Pâmella de Pinho Montovani, Rafaela Elvira Rozza-de-Menezes, Karin Soares Gonçalves Cunha, Danielle Castex Conde
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    Meng-Qi Jia, Jun Jia, Li Wang, Hai-Xiao Zou
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    You Qin, Yanwei Lu, Liduan Zheng, Hong Liu
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    Yae Ohata, Kou Kayamori, Akane Yukimori, Kanako Sumikura, Toshimitsu Ohsako, Hiroyuki Harada, Kei Sakamoto, Tohru Ikeda
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    Daisuke ARAKI, Shunichi YOSHIDA, Keisuke KOYAMA, Shuutarou ISHII, Toshihiro HASEGAWA, Sadao OOYAMA
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    João Pedro Perez Gomes, Andre Luiz Ferreira Costa, Carlos Takahiro Chone, Albina Messias de Almeida Milani Altemani, João Maurício Carrasco Altemani, Carmen Silvia Passos Lima
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    Sase Miwako, Itoh Hiroto, Nakano Takahumi, Hayasaka Junichi, Noguchi Tadahide, Jinbu Yoshinori, Mori Yoshiyuki
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    G. Del Corso, M. L. Tardio, D. B. Gissi, C. Marchetti, L. Montebugnoli, A. Tarsitano
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Extraskeletal Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma in the Axillary Region: Reports of Two Cases
Chang-Young Seo, Sung-Taek Jung, Jae-Wook Byun
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):483-488.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.483
  • 6,457 View
  • 31 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcomas (EMCs) are relatively uncommon, and a location in the upper extremity, especially in the shoulder or axillary region, is rare. Furthermore, the radiographic findings of EMCs do not show any features that distinguish them from other neoplasms, and therefore, definitive diagnoses are made based on histological features. EMC is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis, and requires wide surgical excision. However, its treatment may involve peculiarities such as a difficulty in obtaining a proper surgical margin in the axillary region or shoulder. In this report, the authors present two rare cases of EMCs in the axillary region.

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    Luca Improta, Sergio Valeri, Rossana Alloni, Chiara Pagnoni, Francesco Mallozzi Santa Maria, Beniamino Brunetti, Carlo Greco, Irene Aprile, Mirella Maselli, Bruno Vincenzi, Alessandro Gronchi
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Rosai-Dorfman Disease in the Breast with Increased IgG4 Expressing Plasma Cells: A Case Report
Yoon Jin Cha, Woo Ick Yang, Se Ho Park, Ja Seung Koo
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):489-493.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.489
  • 6,700 View
  • 43 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) can present in any anatomic site, but breast involvement is rarely reported. Recently, a relationship between RDD and IgG4-related sclerosing disease has been suggested. Here we report another case of RDD with overlapping features of IgG4-related sclerosing disease occurring in a right breast of a 62-year-old female. On microscopic examination, the mass demonstrated a characteristic zonal pattern of proliferation of large polygonal histiocytes and lymphoplasma cells with stromal fibrosis. Emperipolesis was observed in histiocytes with abundant cytoplasm, which showed immunoreactivity for S-100 protein and CD68; the diagnosis of RDD was made. Sheets of plasma cells in the fibrotic stroma demonstrated positive reactions for IgG and IgG4. The mean count of IgG4-positive plasma cells was 100.2/high power field, and the ratio of IgG4/IgG was 56.7%. Additional findings of stromal fibrosis and obliteration of preexisting breast lobules suggested overlapping features with IgG4-related sclerosing disease.

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    Polycarp Erivwo, Gulisa Turashvili
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    Salma Machan, Camino Medina, Socorro María Rodríguez-Pinilla, José M. Suárez-Peñaranda, Yolanda Castro, Paula Molés, Celia Requena, Carles Saus, Luis Requena, Carlos Santonja
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Cellular Pseudosarcomatous Fibroepithelial Stromal Polyp of the Vagina during Pregnancy: A Lesion That Is Overdiagnosed as a Malignant Tumor
Joon Seon Song, Dong Eun Song, Kyu-Rae Kim, Jae Y. Ro
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):494-498.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.494
  • 7,786 View
  • 66 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Fibroepithelial stromal polyp (FSP) is a benign lesion that can occur at various sites, including the lower female genital tract. In rare cases, however, it may exhibit hypercellularity, bizarre cytomorphological features, and atypical mitoses resulting in an overdiagnosis as a malignant tumor despite its benign clinical course. Recently, we experienced one case of a 30-year-old pregnant woman with cellular pseudosarcomatous FSP that was initially diagnosed as a malignant fibrous histiocytoma at a primary clinic. In addition to describing the rare features of this case, we wish to increase awareness about this benign lesion which will be essential for avoiding unnecessary radical surgery or chemoradiation treatment.

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    Ruquiya Afrose
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Pigmented Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumor (PEComa) of the Kidney: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Hyeyoon Chang, Wonkyung Jung, Youngran Kang, Woon Yong Jung
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):499-502.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.499
  • 6,827 View
  • 56 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Heavily pigmented perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComa) are rare, only eight cases of which have been reported. Unlike typical epithelioid angiomyolipoma, most of these tumors have been encountered in female patients without tuberous sclerosis. The long-term prognosis thereof is undetermined. Cytological similarity and heavy melanin pigment make it difficult for pigmented PEComa to be differentiated from pigmented clear cell renal cell carcinoma or malignant melanoma. The immunoprofile of tumor cells, such as human melanoma black-45 expression, as well as the absence or presence of other melanocytic or epithelial markers, are helpful in determining a differential diagnosis. Here we report a case of heavily pigmented PEComa of the right kidney and review the literature describing this tumor. In this case, the immunoprofile and clinical features corresponded well to those described in the literature. Since the prognosis of such disease has not yet been established, close follow-up of this patient was recommended.

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  • Malignant Pigmented Epithelioid Angiomyolipoma of the Kidney in a Child with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex
    Thu Dang Anh Phan, Nhi Thuy To, Diem Thi Nhu Pham
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    Takeshi Okamoto, Takashi Sasaki, Yu Takahashi, Manabu Takamatsu, Hiroaki Kanda, Makiko Hiratsuka, Masato Matsuyama, Masato Ozaka, Naoki Sasahira
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Castleman's Disease of the Renal Sinus Presenting as a Urothelial Malignancy: A Brief Case Report
Se Min Jang, Hulin Han, Ki-Seok Jang, Young Jin Jun, Tchun Yong Lee, Seung Sam Paik
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(5):503-506.   Published online October 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.5.503
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Castleman's disease is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder that frequently affects lymph nodes of the mediastinal thorax and the neck. It very rarely affects the renal sinus. We report a case of Castleman's disease arising in the renal sinus in a 64-year-old man. The patient visited the hospital with the chief complaint of hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a homogeneous mass in the sinus of the left kidney, radiologically interpreted as a malignant urothelial tumor. Subsequently, nephroureterectomy was performed, after which microscopic examination of the specimen revealed a diffuse lymphoproliferative lesion with reactive lymphoid follicles of various sizes and prominent plasma cell infiltration of interfollicular spaces, highlighted by immunohistochemical staining for CD138. The lesion was diagnosed as Castleman's disease of the plasma cell type. Although preoperative diagnosis of Castleman's disease is difficult and the incidence is exceedingly rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of renal sinus tumors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Case report: Castleman’s disease involving the renal sinus resembling renal cell carcinoma
    Enlong Zhang, Yuan Li, Ning Lang
    Frontiers in Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2019; 7(8): 1001.     CrossRef
  • Castleman’s Disease: a Suprarenal Surprise!
    Praveen Sundar, Priyank Bijalwan, Ginil Kumar Pooleri
    Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology.2018; 9(2): 254.     CrossRef

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