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Volume 53(4); July 2019
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Reviews
PD-L1 Testing in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Past, Present, and Future
Hyojin Kim, Jin-Haeng Chung
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):199-206.   Published online May 2, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.04.24
Correction in: J Pathol Transl Med 2020;54(2):196
  • 12,167 View
  • 579 Download
  • 40 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blockade of the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) axis has already been established as an effective treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) protein is the only available biomarker that can guide treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer. Because each PD-1/PD-L1 blockade was approved together with a specific PD-L1 IHC assay used in the clinical trials, pathologists have been challenged with performing various assays with a limited sample. To provide a more unified understanding of this, several cross-validation studies between platforms have been performed and showed consistent results. However, the interchangeability of assays may be limited in practice because of the risk of misclassification of patients for the treatment. Furthermore, several issues, including the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of PD-L1 expression in the tumor, and the potential for cytology specimens to be used as an alternative to tissue samples for PD-L1 testing, have still not been resolved. In the future, one of the main aims of immunotherapy research should be to find a novel predictive biomarker for PD-1 blockade therapy and a way to combine it with PD-L1 IHC and other tests.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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  • Molecular Classification of Extrapulmonary Neuroendocrine Carcinomas With Emphasis on POU2F3-positive Tuft Cell Carcinoma
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    American Journal of Surgical Pathology.2023; 47(2): 183.     CrossRef
  • A targeted expression panel for classification, gene fusion detection and PD-L1 measurements – Can molecular profiling replace immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer?
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    Journal of Translational Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between Pretreatment Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Expression as Prognostic Markers in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
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  • Novel Inflammasome-Based Risk Score for Predicting Survival and Efficacy to Immunotherapy in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
    Chih-Cheng Tsao, Hsin-Hung Wu, Ying-Fu Wang, Po-Chien Shen, Wen-Ting Wu, Huang-Yun Chen, Yang-Hong Dai
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(7): 1539.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Analysis of Mutation Status and Immune Landscape for Squamous Cell Carcinomas at Different Anatomical sites
    Wenqi Ti, Tianhui Wei, Jianbo Wang, Yufeng Cheng
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pan-cancer analysis of the angiotensin II receptor-associated protein as a prognostic and immunological gene predicting immunotherapy responses in pan-cancer
    Kai Hong, Yingjue Zhang, Lingli Yao, Jiabo Zhang, Xianneng Sheng, Lihua Song, Yu Guo, Yangyang Guo
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular imaging of immune checkpoints in oncology: Current and future applications
    Shushan Ge, Tongtong Jia, Jihui Li, Bin Zhang, Shengming Deng, Shibiao Sang
    Cancer Letters.2022; 548: 215896.     CrossRef
  • PD-L1 expression and association with genetic background in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma
    Katerina Hadrava Vanova, Ondrej Uher, Leah Meuter, Suman Ghosal, Sara Talvacchio, Mayank Patel, Jiri Neuzil, Karel Pacak
    Frontiers in Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Case report: Variable response to immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: Our experience within the current state of the art
    Nicoletta Provinciali, Marco Greppi, Silvia Pesce, Mariangela Rutigliani, Irene Maria Briata, Tania Buttiron Webber, Marianna Fava, Andrea DeCensi, Emanuela Marcenaro
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • PD-L1 Is Preferentially Expressed in PIT-1 Positive Pituitary Neuroendocrine Tumours
    John Turchini, Loretta Sioson, Adele Clarkson, Amy Sheen, Anthony J. Gill
    Endocrine Pathology.2021; 32(3): 408.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive tumor molecular profile analysis in clinical practice
    Mustafa Özdoğan, Eirini Papadopoulou, Nikolaos Tsoulos, Aikaterini Tsantikidi, Vasiliki-Metaxa Mariatou, Georgios Tsaousis, Evgenia Kapeni, Evgenia Bourkoula, Dimitrios Fotiou, Georgios Kapetsis, Ioannis Boukovinas, Nikolaos Touroutoglou, Athanasios Fassa
    BMC Medical Genomics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • CT-Based Hand-crafted Radiomic Signatures Can Predict PD-L1 Expression Levels in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: a Two-Center Study
    Zekun Jiang, Yinjun Dong, Linke Yang, Yunhong Lv, Shuai Dong, Shuanghu Yuan, Dengwang Li, Liheng Liu
    Journal of Digital Imaging.2021; 34(5): 1073.     CrossRef
  • Deep Learning of Histopathological Features for the Prediction of Tumour Molecular Genetics
    Pierre Murchan, Cathal Ó’Brien, Shane O’Connell, Ciara S. McNevin, Anne-Marie Baird, Orla Sheils, Pilib Ó Broin, Stephen P. Finn
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(8): 1406.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Imaging and the PD-L1 Pathway: From Bench to Clinic
    David Leung, Samuel Bonacorsi, Ralph Adam Smith, Wolfgang Weber, Wendy Hayes
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A comparative study of immunotherapy as second-line treatment and beyond in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma
    Jerónimo Rafael Rodríguez-Cid, Sonia Carrasco-Cara Chards, Iván Romarico González-Espinoza, Vanessa García-Montes, Julio César Garibay-Díaz, Osvaldo Hernández-Flores, Rodrigo Riera-Sala, Anna Gozalishvili-Boncheva, Jorge Arturo Alatorre-Alexander, Luis Ma
    Lung Cancer Management.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical utility of the C‐reactive protein:albumin ratio in non‐small cell lung cancer patients treated with nivolumab
    Taisuke Araki, Kazunari Tateishi, Kei Sonehara, Shuko Hirota, Masamichi Komatsu, Manabu Yamamoto, Shintaro Kanda, Hiroshi Kuraishi, Masayuki Hanaoka, Tomonobu Koizumi
    Thoracic Cancer.2021; 12(5): 603.     CrossRef
  • Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1-Transfected Mouse Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Targeted Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Qiong-ying Hu, Yun Yuan, Yu-chen Li, Lu-yao Yang, Xiang-yu Zhou, Da-qian Xiong, Zi-yi Zhao, Hiroshi Tanaka
    BioMed Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • PD-L1 testing and clinical management of newly diagnosed metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in Spain: MOREL study
    Belen Rubio-Viqueira, Margarita Majem Tarruella, Martín Lázaro, Sergio Vázquez Estévez, Juan Felipe Córdoba-Ortega, Inmaculada Maestu Maiques, Jorge García González, Ana Blasco Cordellat, Javier Valdivia-Bautista, Carmen González Arenas, Jose Miguel Sánch
    Lung Cancer Management.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Can Systems Biology Advance Clinical Precision Oncology?
    Andrea Rocca, Boris N. Kholodenko
    Cancers.2021; 13(24): 6312.     CrossRef
  • Do we need PD‐L1 as a biomarker for thyroid cytologic and histologic specimens?
    Marc P. Pusztaszeri, Massimo Bongiovanni, Fadi Brimo
    Cancer Cytopathology.2020; 128(3): 160.     CrossRef
  • Gut metabolomics profiling of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients under immunotherapy treatment
    Andrea Botticelli, Pamela Vernocchi, Federico Marini, Andrea Quagliariello, Bruna Cerbelli, Sofia Reddel, Federica Del Chierico, Francesca Di Pietro, Raffaele Giusti, Alberta Tomassini, Ottavia Giampaoli, Alfredo Miccheli, Ilaria Grazia Zizzari, Marianna
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced non–small cell lung cancer: A metacentric experience from India
    Santosh Kumar, Srujana Joga, Bivas Biswas, Deepak Dabkara, Kuruswamy Thurai Prasad, Navneet Singh, Prabhat Singh Malik, Sachin Khurana, Sandip Ganguly, Valliappan Muthu, Ullas Batra
    Current Problems in Cancer.2020; 44(3): 100549.     CrossRef
  • Utility of CT radiomics for prediction of PD‐L1 expression in advanced lung adenocarcinomas
    Jiyoung Yoon, Young Joo Suh, Kyunghwa Han, Hyoun Cho, Hye‐Jeong Lee, Jin Hur, Byoung Wook Choi
    Thoracic Cancer.2020; 11(4): 993.     CrossRef
  • Immune checkpoint inhibitors of the PD-1/PD-L1-axis in non-small cell lung cancer: promise, controversies and ambiguities in the novel treatment paradigm
    Lars H. Breimer, Petros Nousios, Louise Olsson, Hans Brunnström
    Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation.2020; 80(5): 360.     CrossRef
  • Tumour mutational burden as a biomarker for immunotherapy: Current data and emerging concepts
    Jean-David Fumet, Caroline Truntzer, Mark Yarchoan, Francois Ghiringhelli
    European Journal of Cancer.2020; 131: 40.     CrossRef
  • Precision Medicine for NSCLC in the Era of Immunotherapy: New Biomarkers to Select the Most Suitable Treatment or the Most Suitable Patient
    Giovanni Rossi, Alessandro Russo, Marco Tagliamento, Alessandro Tuzi, Olga Nigro, Giacomo Vallome, Claudio Sini, Massimiliano Grassi, Maria Giovanna Dal Bello, Simona Coco, Luca Longo, Lodovica Zullo, Enrica Teresa Tanda, Chiara Dellepiane, Paolo Pronzato
    Cancers.2020; 12(5): 1125.     CrossRef
  • Current status and future perspectives of liquid biopsy in non-small cell lung cancer
    Sunhee Chang, Jae Young Hur, Yoon-La Choi, Chang Hun Lee, Wan Seop Kim
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(3): 204.     CrossRef
  • Digital Pathology and PD-L1 Testing in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Workshop Record
    Fabio Pagni, Umberto Malapelle, Claudio Doglioni, Gabriella Fontanini, Filippo Fraggetta, Paolo Graziano, Antonio Marchetti, Elena Guerini Rocco, Pasquale Pisapia, Elena V. Vigliar, Fiamma Buttitta, Marta Jaconi, Nicola Fusco, Massimo Barberis, Giancarlo
    Cancers.2020; 12(7): 1800.     CrossRef
  • PD-L1 in Systemic Immunity: Unraveling Its Contribution to PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade Immunotherapy
    Ana Bocanegra, Ester Blanco, Gonzalo Fernandez-Hinojal, Hugo Arasanz, Luisa Chocarro, Miren Zuazo, Pilar Morente, Ruth Vera, David Escors, Grazyna Kochan
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2020; 21(16): 5918.     CrossRef
  • PD-1 blockade in recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer: Data from cemiplimab phase I expansion cohorts and characterization of PD-L1 expression in cervical cancer
    Danny Rischin, Marta Gil-Martin, Antonio González-Martin, Irene Braña, June Y. Hou, Daniel Cho, Gerald S. Falchook, Silvia Formenti, Salma Jabbour, Kathleen Moore, Aung Naing, Kyriakos P. Papadopoulos, Joaquina Baranda, Wen Fury, Minjie Feng, Elizabeth St
    Gynecologic Oncology.2020; 159(2): 322.     CrossRef
  • Atezolizumab: A Review in Extensive-Stage SCLC
    James E. Frampton
    Drugs.2020; 80(15): 1587.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic and clinicopathological roles of programmed death‐ligand 1 ( PD‐L1 ) expression in thymic epithelial tumors: A meta‐analysis
    Hyun Min Koh, Bo Gun Jang, Hyun Ju Lee, Chang Lim Hyun
    Thoracic Cancer.2020; 11(11): 3086.     CrossRef
  • Präzisionsmedizin bei NSCLC im Zeitalter der Immuntherapie: Neue Biomarker zur Selektion der am besten geeigneten Therapie oder des am besten geeigneten Patienten
    Giovanni Rossi, Alessandro Russo, Marco Tagliamento, Alessandro Tuzi, Olga Nigro, Giacomo Vollome, Claudio Sini, Massimiliano Grassi, Maria Giovanna Dal Bello, Simona Coco, Luca Longo, Lodovica Zullo, Enrica Teresa Tanda, Chiara Dellepiane, Paolo Pronzato
    Kompass Pneumologie.2020; 8(6): 300.     CrossRef
  • Association with PD-L1 Expression and Clinicopathological Features in 1000 Lung Cancers: A Large Single-Institution Study of Surgically Resected Lung Cancers with a High Prevalence of EGFR Mutation
    Lee, Kim, Sung, Lee, Han, Kim, Choi
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2019; 20(19): 4794.     CrossRef
  • Detailed Characterization of Immune Cell Infiltrate and Expression of Immune Checkpoint Molecules PD-L1/CTLA-4 and MMR Proteins in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors Disclose Novel Disease Biomarkers
    João Lobo, Ângelo Rodrigues, Rita Guimarães, Mariana Cantante, Paula Lopes, Joaquina Maurício, Jorge Oliveira, Carmen Jerónimo, Rui Henrique
    Cancers.2019; 11(10): 1535.     CrossRef
  • Basis of PD1/PD-L1 Therapies
    Barbara Seliger
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2019; 8(12): 2168.     CrossRef
How to Foster Professional Values during Pathology Residency
Yong-Jin Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):207-209.   Published online June 27, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.06.12
  • 3,914 View
  • 94 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The importance of professional and ethical behavior by physicians both in training and in practice cannot be overemphasized, particularly in pathology. Professionalism education begins in medical school, and professional attitudes and behaviors are further internalized during residency. Learning how to be a professional is a vital part of residency training. While hospital- or institution-based lecture style educational programs exist, they are often ineffective because the curriculum is not applicable to all specialties, although the basic concepts are the same. In this paper, the author suggests ways for institutions to develop professional attitude assessments and to survey residents’ responses to various unprofessional situations using case scenarios.
Current Status of and Perspectives on Cervical Cancer Screening in Korea
Sung-Chul Lim, Chong Woo Yoo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):210-216.   Published online May 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.04.11
  • 6,589 View
  • 220 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the introduction of the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear system in 1943, cervicovaginal cytology has been used as a standard screening test for cervical cancer. The dissemination of this test contributed to reductions of the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer worldwide. In Korea, regular health check-ups for industrial workers and their family members were introduced in 1988 and were performed as part of the National Cancer Screening Program in 1999. As a result, the incidence of cervical cancer in Korea has been steadily decreasing. However, about 800 cases of cervical cancer-related deaths are reported each year due to false-negative test results. Hence, new screening methods have been proposed. Liquid-based cytology (LBC) was introduced in 1996 to overcome the limitations of conventional Pap smears. Since then, other LBC methods have been developed and utilized, including the human papilloma virus test—a method with higher sensitivity that requires fewer screenings. In this study, we review current issues and future perspectives related to cervical cancer screening in Korea.

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    Roxanne Westwood , Joanna Lavery
    Primary Health Care.2022; 32(1): 22.     CrossRef
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    Ha Young Woo, Hyun-Soo Kim
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    Sanja Milenković
    Glasnik javnog zdravlja.2022; 96(3): 313.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(4): 318.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Association between Expression of 8-OHdG and Cigarette Smoking in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
Ae Ri An, Kyoung Min Kim, Ho Sung Park, Kyu Yun Jang, Woo Sung Moon, Myoung Jae Kang, Yong Chul Lee, Jong Hun Kim, Han Jung Chae, Myoung Ja Chung
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):217-224.   Published online March 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.02.20
  • 5,466 View
  • 219 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Exposure to cigarette smoking (CS) is a major risk factor for the development of lung cancer. CS is known to cause oxidative DNA damage and mutation of tumor-related genes, and these factors are involved in carcinogenesis. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is considered to be a reliable biomarker for oxidative DNA damage. Increased levels of 8-OHdG are associated with a number of pathological conditions, including cancer. There are no reports on the expression of 8-OHdG by immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Methods
We investigated the expression of 8-OHdG and p53 in 203 NSCLC tissues using immunohistochemistry and correlated it with clinicopathological features including smoking.
Results
The expression of 8-OHdG was observed in 83.3% of NSCLC. It was significantly correlated with a low T category, negative lymph node status, never-smoker, and longer overall survival (p < .05) by univariate analysis. But multivariate analysis revealed that 8-OHdG was not an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in NSCLC patients. The aberrant expression of p53 significantly correlated with smoking, male, squamous cell carcinoma, and Ki-67 positivity (p < .05).
Conclusions
The expression of 8-OHdG was associated with good prognostic factors. It was positively correlated with never-smokers in NSCLC, suggesting that oxidative damage of DNA cannot be explained by smoking alone and may depend on complex control mechanisms.

Citations

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  • Serum 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine Predicts Severity and Prognosis of Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    Didem ÖZKAL EMİNOĞLU, Varol ÇANAKÇI
    Atatürk Üniversitesi Diş Hekimliği Fakültesi Dergisi.2020; : 1.     CrossRef
CpG Island Methylation in Sessile Serrated Adenoma/Polyp of the Colorectum: Implications for Differential Diagnosis of Molecularly High-Risk Lesions among Non-dysplastic Sessile Serrated Adenomas/Polyps
Ji Ae Lee, Hye Eun Park, Seung-Yeon Yoo, Seorin Jeong, Nam-Yun Cho, Gyeong Hoon Kang, Jung Ho Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):225-235.   Published online March 19, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.03.12
  • 5,713 View
  • 217 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Although colorectal sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) with morphologic dysplasia are regarded as definite high-risk premalignant lesions, no reliable grading or risk-stratifying system exists for non-dysplastic SSA/Ps. The accumulation of CpG island methylation is a molecular hallmark of progression of SSA/Ps. Thus, we decided to classify non-dysplastic SSA/Ps into risk subgroups based on the extent of CpG island methylation.
Methods
The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status of 132 non-dysplastic SSA/Ps was determined using eight CIMP-specific promoter markers. SSA/Ps with CIMP-high and/or MLH1 promoter methylation were regarded as a high-risk subgroup.
Results
Based on the CIMP analysis results, methylation frequency of each CIMP marker suggested a sequential pattern of CpG island methylation during progression of SSA/P, indicating MLH1 as a late-methylated marker. Among the 132 non-dysplastic SSA/Ps, 34 (26%) were determined to be high-risk lesions (33 CIMP-high and 8 MLH1-methylated cases; seven cases overlapped). All 34 high-risk SSA/Ps were located exclusively in the proximal colon (100%, p = .001) and were significantly associated with older age (≥ 50 years, 100%; p = .003) and a larger histologically measured lesion size (> 5 mm, 100%; p = .004). In addition, the high-risk SSA/Ps were characterized by a relatively higher number of typical base-dilated serrated crypts.
Conclusions
Both CIMP-high and MLH1 methylation are late-step molecular events during progression of SSA/Ps and rarely occur in SSA/Ps of young patients. Comprehensive consideration of age (≥ 50), location (proximal colon), and histologic size (> 5 mm) may be important for the prediction of high-risk lesions among non-dysplastic SSA/Ps.

Citations

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  • Serrated Colorectal Lesions: An Up-to-Date Review from Histological Pattern to Molecular Pathogenesis
    Martino Mezzapesa, Giuseppe Losurdo, Francesca Celiberto, Salvatore Rizzi, Antonio d’Amati, Domenico Piscitelli, Enzo Ierardi, Alfredo Di Leo
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4461.     CrossRef
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    Jung Ho Kim, Gyeong Hoon Kang
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(4): 276.     CrossRef
Serous Adenocarcinoma of Fallopian Tubes: Histological and Immunohistochemical Aspects
Natalia Hyriavenko, Mykola Lyndin, Kateryna Sikora, Artem Piddubnyi, Ludmila Karpenko, Olha Kravtsova, Dmytrii Hyriavenko, Olena Diachenko, Vladyslav Sikora, Anatolii Romaniuk
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):236-243.   Published online April 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.03.21
  • 5,246 View
  • 113 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Although primary cancer of the fallopian tubes is a relatively rare type of tumor in female reproductive organs, its mortality is quite high. It is important to identify molecular and biological markers of this malignancy that determine its specific phenotype.
Methods
The study was carried out on samples received from 71 female patients with primary cancer of the fallopian tubes. The main molecular and biological properties, including hormone status (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR]), human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)/neu expression, proliferative potential (Ki-67), apoptosis (p53, Bcl-2), and pro-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) quality of serous tumors were studied in comparison with clinical and morphological characteristics.
Results
ER and PR expression is accompanied by low grade neoplasia, early clinical disease stage, and absence of lymphogenic metastasis (p < .001). HER2/neu expression is not typical for primary cancer of the fallopian tubes. Ki-67 expression is characterized by an inverse correlation with ER and PR (p < .05) and is associated with lymphogenic metastasis (p < .01). p53+ status correlates with high grade malignancy, tumor progression, metastasis, negative ER/PR (p < .001), and negative Bcl-2 status (p < .05). Positive Bcl-2 status is positively correlated with ER and PR expression and low grade malignancy.
Conclusions
Complex morphologic (histological and immunohistochemical) study of postoperative material allows estimation of the degree of malignancy and tumor spread to enable appropriate treatment for each case.

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  • FEATURES OF ENDOMETRIUM STRUCTURE IN ALCOHOL-ABUSING HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS
    M. Lytvynenko
    Inter Collegas.2021; 8(1): 52.     CrossRef
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    Mandy Womble, Megan E. Schreeg, Allison Hoch, Enoch B. de Souza Meira, Derek Foster, Christopher Premanandan, Tatiane T. Negrão Watanabe
    Journal of Comparative Pathology.2021; 189: 52.     CrossRef
  • Problems of primary fallopian tube cancer diagnostics during and after surgery
    D.G. Sumtsov, I.Z. Gladchuk, G.O. Sumtsov, N.I. Hyriavenko, M.S. Lyndin, V.V. Sikora, V.M. Zaporozhan
    REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY.2021; (59): 66.     CrossRef
Prognostic Significance of CD109 Expression in Patients with Ovarian Epithelial Cancer
So Young Kim, Kyung Un Choi, Chungsu Hwang, Hyung Jung Lee, Jung Hee Lee, Dong Hoon Shin, Jee Yeon Kim, Mee Young Sol, Jae Ho Kim, Ki Hyung Kim, Dong Soo Suh, Byung Su Kwon
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):244-252.   Published online May 2, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.04.16
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC) is the second-most common gynecologic malignancy. CD109 expression is elevated in human tumor cell lines and carcinomas. A previous study showed that CD109 expression is elevated in human tumor cell lines and CD109 plays a role in cancer progression. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether CD109 is expressed in OEC and can be useful in predicting the prognosis.
Methods
Immunohistochemical staining for CD109 and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed. Then we compared CD109 expression and chemoresistance, overall survival, and recurrence-free survival of OEC patients. Chemoresistance was evaluated by dividing into good-response group and poor-response group by the time to recurrence after chemotherapy.
Results
CD109 expression was associated with overall survival (p = .020), but not recurrence-free survival (p = .290). CD109 expression was not an independent risk factor for overall survival due to its reliability (hazard ratio, 1.58; p = .160; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 3.05), although we found that CD109 positivity was related to chemoresistance. The poor-response group showed higher rates of CD109 expression than the good-response group (93.8% vs 66.7%, p = .047). Also, the CD109 mRNA expression level was 2.88 times higher in the poor-response group as compared to the good-response group (p = .001).
Conclusions
Examining the CD109 expression in patients with OEC may be helpful in predicting survival and chemotherapeutic effect.

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  • CD109 facilitates progression and 5-fluorouracil resistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    Zhenwei Zhu, Fang Zhou, Cheng Mao
    Materials Express.2022; 12(9): 1189.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of CD109 expression as a prognostic biomarker in patients with cancer
    Hyun Min Koh, Hyun Ju Lee, Dong Chul Kim
    Medicine.2021; 100(11): e25006.     CrossRef
  • Serum CD109 levels reflect the node metastasis status in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
    Sumitaka Hagiwara, Eiichi Sasaki, Yasuhisa Hasegawa, Hidenori Suzuki, Daisuke Nishikawa, Shintaro Beppu, Hoshino Terada, Michi Sawabe, Masahide Takahashi, Nobuhiro Hanai
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Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in Korea: A Clinicopathological Study of Five Patients
Hyo Jeong Kang, Soon Auck Hong, Seak Hee Oh, Kyung Mo Kim, Han-Wook Yoo, Gu-Hwan Kim, Eunsil Yu
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):253-260.   Published online May 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.05.03
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  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive liver diseases that present as neonatal cholestasis. Little is known of this disease in Korea.
Methods
The records of five patients histologically diagnosed with PFIC, one with PFIC1 and four with PFIC2, by liver biopsy or transplant were reviewed, and ATP8B1 and ABCB11 mutation status was analyzed by direct DNA sequencing. Clinicopathological characteristics were correlated with genetic mutations.
Results
The first symptom in all patients was jaundice. Histologically, lobular cholestasis with bile plugs was the main finding in all patients, whereas diffuse or periportal cholestasis was identified only in patients with PFIC2. Giant cells and ballooning of hepatocytes were observed in three and three patients with PFIC2, respectively, but not in the patient with PFIC1. Immunostaining showed total loss of bile salt export pump in two patients with PFIC2 and focal loss in two. Lobular and portal based fibrosis were more advanced in PFIC2 than in PFIC1. ATP8B1 and ABCB11 mutations were identified in one PFIC1 and two PFIC2 patients, respectively. One PFIC1 and three PFIC2 patients underwent liver transplantation (LT). At age 7 months, one PFIC2 patient was diagnosed with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma and infantile hemangioma in an explanted liver. The patient with PFIC1 developed steatohepatitis after LT. One patient showed recurrence of PFIC2 after 10 years and underwent LT.
Conclusions
PFIC is not rare in patients with neonatal cholestasis of unknown origin. Proper clinicopathologic correlation and genetic testing can enable early detection and management.

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  • Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis: A Study in Children From a Liver Transplant Center in India
    Sagar Mehta, Karunesh Kumar, Ravi Bhardwaj, Smita Malhotra, Neerav Goyal, Anupam Sibal
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology.2022; 12(2): 454.     CrossRef
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    Jung-Man Namgoong, Shin Hwang, Hyunhee Kwon, Suhyeon Ha, Kyung Mo Kim, Seak Hee Oh, Seung-Mo Hong
    Annals of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.2022; 26(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • Liver Transplantation for Pediatric Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review
    Christos D. Kakos, Ioannis A. Ziogas, Charikleia D. Demiri, Stepan M. Esagian, Konstantinos P. Economopoulos, Dimitrios Moris, Georgios Tsoulfas, Sophoclis P. Alexopoulos
    Cancers.2022; 14(5): 1294.     CrossRef
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    I. M. Iljinsky, N. P. Mozheiko, O. M. Tsirulnikova
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Case Study
Primary Necrobiotic Xanthogranulomatous Sialadenitis with Submandibular Gland Localization without Skin Involvement
Myunghee Kang, Na Rae Kim, Dong Hae Chung, Jae Yeon Seok, Dong Young Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):261-265.   Published online January 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.01.08
  • 4,942 View
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  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous reaction is a multiorgan, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis with an unknown etiology. Occurrence in the salivary gland is extremely rare. We recently identified a case of necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous sialadenitis in a 73-year-old Korean woman who presented with a painless palpable lesion in the chin. There was no accompanying cutaneous lesion. Partial resection and subsequent wide excision with neck dissection were performed. Pathological examination showed a severe inflammatory lesion that included foamy macrophages centrally admixed with neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered giant cells, as well as necrobiosis. During the 12-month postoperative period, no grossly remarkable change in size was noted. Necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous inflammation may be preceded by or combined with hematologic malignancy. Although rare, clinicians and radiologists should be aware that an adhesive necrobiotic xanthogranuloma in the salivary gland may present with a mass-like lesion. Further evaluation for hematologic disease and close follow-up are needed when a pathologic diagnosis is made.

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  • Five Cases of Xanthogranulomatous Sialadenitis
    Satoshi Kiyama, Hiroyuki Iuchi, Kotoko Ito, Kengo Nishimoto, Tsutomu Matsuzaki, Masaru Yamashita
    Practica Oto-Rhino-Laryngologica.2022; 115(4): 315.     CrossRef
  • Xanthogranulomatous change in a pleomorphic adenoma: An extremely rare variant/degenerative change. Is it fine needle aspiration induced?
    Mukta Pujani, Dipti Sidam, Kanika Singh, Aparna Khandelwal, Khushbu Katarya
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sang Hyun Kim, Sun Woo Kim, Sang Hyuk Lee
    Korean Journal of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.2021; 64(6): 422.     CrossRef
  • Xanthogranulomatous Sialadenitis, an Uncommon Reactive Change is Often Associated with Warthin’s Tumor
    Lihong Bu, Hui Zhu, Emilian Racila, Sobia Khaja, David Hamlar, Faqian Li
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    Naoya KITAMURA, Seiji OHNO, Tetsuya YAMAMOTO
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Case Report
Rectal Invasion by Prostatic Adenocarcinoma That Was Initially Diagnosed in a Rectal Polyp on Colonoscopy
Ghilsuk Yoon, Man-Hoon Han, An Na Seo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):266-269.   Published online April 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.03.25
  • 4,966 View
  • 109 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite anatomical proximity, prostatic adenocarcinoma with rectal invasion is extremely rare. We present a case of rectal invasion by prostatic adenocarcinoma that was initially diagnosed from a rectal polyp biopsied on colonoscopy in a 69-year-old Korean man. He presented with dull anal pain and voiding discomfort for several days. Computed tomography revealed either prostatic adenocarcinoma with rectal invasion or rectal adenocarcinoma with prostatic invasion. His tumor marker profile showed normal prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and significantly elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level. Colonoscopy was performed, and a specimen was obtained from a round, 1.5 cm, sessile polyp that was 1.5 cm above the anal verge. Microscopically, glandular tumor structures infiltrated into the rectal mucosa and submucosa. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells showed alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase positivity, PSA positivity, and caudal-related homeobox 2 negativity. The final diagnosis of the rectal polyp was consistent with prostatic adenocarcinoma. Here, we present a rare case that could have been misdiagnosed as rectal adenocarcinoma.

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  • An Interesting Case of Prostate Cancer Presenting With Colonic Metastasis
    Shawn Keating, Ayesha Imtiaz, Kenneth Nahum, Ankita Prasad, Pramil Cheriyath
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Shashank Shekhar Singh, Rani Kunti Randhir Singh, Narvesh Kumar, Harshvardhan Atrey
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    Anshu Wadehra, Samer Alkassis, Aliza Rizwan, Omid Yazdanpanah
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    Ese Uwagbale, Ifeanyichukwu Onukogu, Vimal Bodiwala, Solomon Agbroko, Niket Sonpal
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    Nandan Keshav, Mark D. Ehrhart, Steven C. Eberhardt, Martha F. Terrazas
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Brief Case Report
Endocervical Adenocarcinoma In Situ Phenotype with Ovarian Metastasis
Hyun-Soo Kim, Yeon Seung Chung, Moon Sik Kim, Hyang Joo Ryu, Ji Hee Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):270-272.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2018.12.17
  • 4,562 View
  • 126 Download
  • 6 Citations
PDF

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  • Endocervical adenocarcinoma in situ with ovarian metastases
    Kate Glennon, Ann Treacy, Tony Geoghegan, Paul Downey, Donal Brennan
    International Journal of Gynecologic Cancer.2022; 32(4): 566.     CrossRef
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    Nicolò Bizzarri, Luigi Pedone Anchora, Paola Cattani, Rosa De Vincenzo, Simona Marchetti, Carmine Conte, Vito Chiantera, Valerio Gallotta, Salvatore Gueli Alletti, Giuseppe Vizzielli, Barbara Costantini, Anna Fagotti, Francesco Fanfani, Giovanni Scambia,
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    Jennifer Taylor, W. Glenn McCluggage
    Pathology.2021; 53(5): 568.     CrossRef
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    Duaa Abu-Sinn, Jackie Jamison, Matthew Evans, W. Glenn McCluggage
    International Journal of Gynecological Pathology.2021; 40(6): 541.     CrossRef
  • Superficially Spreading Endocervical Adenocarcinoma in situ with Multifocal Microscopic Involvement of the Endometrial Surface: A Case Report with Emphasis on the Potential for Misdiagnosis Based on Endometrial Curettage Specimens
    Inwoo Hwang, Jiyeon Lee, Kyue-Hee Choi, Jiheun Han, Hyun-Soo Kim
    Case Reports in Oncology.2020; 13(3): 1530.     CrossRef

JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine