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Volume 53(6); November 2019
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Original Articles
Interobserver Reproducibility of PD-L1 Biomarker in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Study by 27 Pathologists
Sunhee Chang, Hyung Kyu Park, Yoon-La Choi, Se Jin Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):347-353.   Published online October 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.29
  • 4,651 View
  • 183 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Assessment of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) immunohistochemical staining is used for treatment decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regarding use of PD-L1/programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) immunotherapy. The reliability of the PD-L1 22C3 pharmDx assay is critical in guiding clinical practice. The Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists investigated the interobserver reproducibility of PD-L1 staining with 22C3 pharmDx in NSCLC samples.
Methods
Twenty-seven pathologists individually assessed the tumor proportion score (TPS) for 107 NSCLC samples. Each case was divided into three levels based on TPS: <1%, 1%–49%, and ≥50%.
Results
The intraclass correlation coefficient for TPS was 0.902±0.058. Weighted κ coefficient for 3-step assessment was 0.748±0.093. The κ coefficients for 1% and 50% cut-offs were 0.633 and 0.834, respectively. There was a significant association between interobserver reproducibility and experience (formal PD-L1 training, more experience for PD-L1 assessment, and longer practice duration on surgical pathology), histologic subtype, and specimen type.
Conclusions
Our results indicate that PD-L1 immunohistochemical staining provides a reproducible basis for decisions on anti–PD-1 therapy in NSCLC.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Artificial intelligence-assisted system for precision diagnosis of PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer
    Jianghua Wu, Changling Liu, Xiaoqing Liu, Wei Sun, Linfeng Li, Nannan Gao, Yajun Zhang, Xin Yang, Junjie Zhang, Haiyue Wang, Xinying Liu, Xiaozheng Huang, Yanhui Zhang, Runfen Cheng, Kaiwen Chi, Luning Mao, Lixin Zhou, Dongmei Lin, Shaoping Ling
    Modern Pathology.2022; 35(3): 403.     CrossRef
  • Immunohistochemistry as predictive and prognostic markers for gastrointestinal malignancies
    Matthew W. Rosenbaum, Raul S. Gonzalez
    Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology.2022; 39(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Cancer: Mechanisms, Biomarkers, and Therapeutic Approaches
    Sangjoon Choi, Sujin Park, Hyunjin Kim, So Young Kang, Soomin Ahn, Kyoung-Mee Kim
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(3): 543.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a supervised deep learning algorithm for automated whole‐slide programmed death‐ligand 1 tumour proportion score assessment in non‐small cell lung cancer
    Liesbeth M Hondelink, Melek Hüyük, Pieter E Postmus, Vincent T H B M Smit, Sami Blom, Jan H Thüsen, Danielle Cohen
    Histopathology.2022; 80(4): 635.     CrossRef
  • 5-hmC loss is another useful tool in addition to BAP1 and MTAP immunostains to distinguish diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma from reactive mesothelial hyperplasia in peritoneal cytology cell-blocks and biopsies
    Ziyad Alsugair, Vahan Kepenekian, Tanguy Fenouil, Olivier Glehen, Laurent Villeneuve, Sylvie Isaac, Juliette Hommell-Fontaine, Nazim Benzerdjeb
    Virchows Archiv.2022; 481(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Artificial intelligence–powered programmed death ligand 1 analyser reduces interobserver variation in tumour proportion score for non–small cell lung cancer with better prediction of immunotherapy response
    Sangjoon Choi, Soo Ick Cho, Minuk Ma, Seonwook Park, Sergio Pereira, Brian Jaehong Aum, Seunghwan Shin, Kyunghyun Paeng, Donggeun Yoo, Wonkyung Jung, Chan-Young Ock, Se-Hoon Lee, Yoon-La Choi, Jin-Haeng Chung, Tony S. Mok, Hyojin Kim, Seokhwi Kim
    European Journal of Cancer.2022; 170: 17.     CrossRef
  • Artificial Intelligence-Assisted Score Analysis for Predicting the Expression of the Immunotherapy Biomarker PD-L1 in Lung Cancer
    Guoping Cheng, Fuchuang Zhang, Yishi Xing, Xingyi Hu, He Zhang, Shiting Chen, Mengdao Li, Chaolong Peng, Guangtai Ding, Dadong Zhang, Peilin Chen, Qingxin Xia, Meijuan Wu
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of artificial intelligence-powered and manual quantification of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression with outcomes in patients treated with nivolumab ± ipilimumab
    Vipul Baxi, George Lee, Chunzhe Duan, Dimple Pandya, Daniel N. Cohen, Robin Edwards, Han Chang, Jun Li, Hunter Elliott, Harsha Pokkalla, Benjamin Glass, Nishant Agrawal, Abhik Lahiri, Dayong Wang, Aditya Khosla, Ilan Wapinski, Andrew Beck, Michael Montalt
    Modern Pathology.2022; 35(11): 1529.     CrossRef
  • High interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility among pathologists assessing PD‐L1 CPS across multiple indications
    Shanthy Nuti, Yiwei Zhang, Nabila Zerrouki, Charlotte Roach, Gudrun Bänfer, George L Kumar, Edward Manna, Rolf Diezko, Kristopher Kersch, Josef Rüschoff, Bharat Jasani
    Histopathology.2022; 81(6): 732.     CrossRef
  • Modifying factors of PD‐L1 expression on tumor cells in advanced non‐small‐cell lung cancer
    Alejandro Avilés‐Salas, Diana Flores‐Estrada, Luis Lara‐Mejía, Rodrigo Catalán, Graciela Cruz‐Rico, Mario Orozco‐Morales, David Heredia, Laura Bolaño‐Guerra, Pamela Denisse Soberanis‐Piña, Edgar Varela‐Santoyo, Andrés F. Cardona, Oscar Arrieta
    Thoracic Cancer.2022; 13(23): 3362.     CrossRef
  • A practical approach for PD-L1 evaluation in gastroesophageal cancer
    Valentina Angerilli, Matteo Fassan, Paola Parente, Irene Gullo, Michela Campora, Chiara Rossi, Maria Luisa Sacramento, Gianmaria Pennelli, Alessandro Vanoli, Federica Grillo, Luca Mastracci
    Pathologica.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparability of laboratory-developed and commercial PD-L1 assays in non-small cell lung carcinoma
    Julia R. Naso, Gang Wang, Norbert Banyi, Fatemeh Derakhshan, Aria Shokoohi, Cheryl Ho, Chen Zhou, Diana N. Ionescu
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2021; 50: 151590.     CrossRef
  • Interobserver agreement in programmed cell death‐ligand 1 immunohistochemistry scoring in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma cytologic specimens
    William Sinclair, Peter Kobalka, Rongqin Ren, Boulos Beshai, Abberly A. Lott Limbach, Lai Wei, Ping Mei, Zaibo Li
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2021; 49(2): 219.     CrossRef
  • Automated PD-L1 Scoring for Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Open-Source Software
    Julia R. Naso, Tetiana Povshedna, Gang Wang, Norbert Banyi, Calum MacAulay, Diana N. Ionescu, Chen Zhou
    Pathology and Oncology Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Immunohistochemical Expression of Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Is Affected by Sample Overfixation
    Angels Barberà, Ruth Marginet Flinch, Montserrat Martin, Jose L. Mate, Albert Oriol, Fina Martínez-Soler, Tomas Santalucia, Pedro L. Fernández
    Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology.2021; 29(1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Programmed cell death-ligand 1 assessment in urothelial carcinoma: prospect and limitation
    Kyu Sang Lee, Gheeyoung Choe
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2021; 55(3): 163.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Semi-Quantitative Scoring and Artificial Intelligence Aided Digital Image Analysis of Chromogenic Immunohistochemistry
    János Bencze, Máté Szarka, Balázs Kóti, Woosung Seo, Tibor G. Hortobágyi, Viktor Bencs, László V. Módis, Tibor Hortobágyi
    Biomolecules.2021; 12(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Immunization against ROS1 by DNA Electroporation Impairs K-Ras-Driven Lung Adenocarcinomas
    Federica Riccardo, Giuseppina Barutello, Angela Petito, Lidia Tarone, Laura Conti, Maddalena Arigoni, Chiara Musiu, Stefania Izzo, Marco Volante, Dario Livio Longo, Irene Fiore Merighi, Mauro Papotti, Federica Cavallo, Elena Quaglino
    Vaccines.2020; 8(2): 166.     CrossRef
  • Utility of PD-L1 testing on non-small cell lung cancer cytology specimens: An institutional experience with interobserver variability analysis
    Oleksandr Kravtsov, Christopher P. Hartley, Yuri Sheinin, Bryan C. Hunt, Juan C. Felix, Tamara Giorgadze
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2020; 48: 151602.     CrossRef
MicroRNA-374a Expression as a Prognostic Biomarker in Lung Adenocarcinoma
Yeseul Kim, Jongmin Sim, Hyunsung Kim, Seong Sik Bang, Seungyun Jee, Sungeon Park, Kiseok Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):354-360.   Published online October 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.10.01
  • 3,872 View
  • 119 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death, and adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic subtype. MicroRNA is a small non-coding RNA that inhibits multiple target gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and is commonly dysregulated in malignant tumors. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression of microRNA-374a (miR-374a) in lung adenocarcinoma and correlate its expression with various clinicopathological characteristics.
Methods
The expression level of miR-374a was measured in 111 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lung adenocarcinoma tissues using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The correlation between miR-374a expression and clinicopathological parameters, including clinical outcome, was further analyzed.
Results
High miR-374 expression was correlated with advanced pT category (chi-square test, p=.004) and pleural invasion (chi-square test, p=.034). Survival analysis revealed that patients with high miR-374a expression had significantly shorter disease-free survival relative to those with low miR-374a expression (log-rank test, p=.032).
Conclusions
miR-374a expression may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker for predicting recurrence in early stage lung adenocarcinoma after curative surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dysregulation of miR-374a is involved in the progression of diabetic retinopathy and regulates the proliferation and migration of retinal microvascular endothelial cells
    Zhanhong Wang, Xiao Zhang, Yanjun Wang, Dailing Xiao
    Clinical and Experimental Optometry.2022; 105(3): 287.     CrossRef
  • MicroRNA Profile for Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in Thyroid Cancer
    Jong-Lyul Park, Seon-Kyu Kim, Sora Jeon, Chan-Kwon Jung, Yong-Sung Kim
    Cancers.2021; 13(4): 632.     CrossRef
Molecular and Clinicopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in Vietnamese Patients
Quoc Dat Ngo, Quoc Thang Pham, Dang Anh Thu Phan, Anh Vu Hoang, Thi Ngoc Ha Hua, Sao Trung Nguyen
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):361-368.   Published online September 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.08.27
  • 4,657 View
  • 142 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Management of GIST patients is currently based on clinicopathological features and associated genetic changes. However, the detailed characteristics and molecular genetic features of GISTs have not yet been described in the Vietnamese population.
Methods
We first identified 155 patients with primary GIST who underwent surgery with primary curative intent between 2011 and 2014 at University Medical Center at Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We evaluated the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical reactivity to p53 and Ki-67 in these patients. Additionally, KIT genotyping was performed in 100 cases.
Results
The largest proportion of GISTs was classified as high-risk (43.2%). Of the 155 GISTs, 52 (33.5%) were positive for Ki-67, and 58 (37.4%) were positive for p53. The expression of Ki-67 and p53 were correlated with mitotic rate, tumor size, risk assessment, and tumor stage. Out of 100 GIST cases, KIT mutation was found in 68%, of which 62 (91.2%) were found in exon 11, two (2.9%) in exon 9, and four (5.8%) in exon 17. No mutation in exon 13 was identified. Additionally, KIT mutations did not correlate with any clinicopathological features.
Conclusions
The expression of Ki-67 and p53 were associated with high-risk tumors. Mutations in exon 11 were the most commonly found, followed by exon 17 and exon 9. Additionally, KIT mutation status was not correlated with any recognized clinicopathological features.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ki67 for evaluating the prognosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A systematic review and meta‑analysis
    Ji Li, An-Ran Wang, Xiao-Dong Chen, Hong Pan, Shi-Qiang Li
    Oncology Letters.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic ultrasound‐guided fine‐needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach
    José‐Fernando Val‐Bernal, Elena Yllera, María Moris, Ihab Abdulkader Nallib, Angel Vázquez‐Boquete, María Martino
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2020; 48(9): 833.     CrossRef
Comparison of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Tongue between Young and Old Patients
Gyuheon Choi, Joon Seon Song, Seung-Ho Choi, Soon Yuhl Nam, Sang Yoon Kim, Jong-Lyel Roh, Bu-Kyu Lee, Kyung-Ja Cho
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):369-377.   Published online October 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.16
  • 4,738 View
  • 158 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The worldwide incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (SCCOT) in young patients has been increasing. We investigated clinicopathologic features of this unique population and compared them with those of SCCOT in the elderly to delineate its pathogenesis.
Methods
We compared clinicopathological parameters between patients under and over 45 years old. Immunohistochemical assays of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, p53, p16, mdm2, cyclin D1, and glutathione S-transferase P1 were also compared between them.
Results
Among 189 cases, 51 patients (27.0%) were under 45 years of age. A higher proportion of women was seen in the young group, but was not statistically significant. Smoking and drinking behaviors between age groups were similar. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis showed no significant difference by age and sex other than higher histologic grades observed in young patients.
Conclusions
SCCOT in young adults has similar clinicopathological features to that in the elderly, suggesting that both progress via similar pathogenetic pathways.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Frequency in Young Patients from Referral Centers Around the World
    Rafael Ferreira e Costa, Marina Luiza Baião Leão, Maria Sissa Pereira Sant’Ana, Ricardo Alves Mesquita, Ricardo Santiago Gomez, Alan Roger Santos-Silva, Syed Ali Khurram, Artysha Tailor, Ciska-Mari Schouwstra, Liam Robinson, Willie F. P. van Heerden, Rami
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    E.S. Kolegova, M.R. Patysheva, I.V. Larionova, I.K. Fedorova, D.E. Kulbakin, E.L. Choinzonov, E.V. Denisov
    International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2022; 51(12): 1497.     CrossRef
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    Brianna M. Jones, Dillan F. Villavisanis, Eric J. Lehrer, Daniel R. Dickstein, Kunal K. Sindhu, Krzysztof J. Misiukiewicz, Marshall Posner, Jerry T. Liu, Vishal Gupta, Sonam Sharma, Scott A. Roof, Marita Teng, Eric M. Genden, Richard L. Bakst
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    Contemporary Clinical Dentistry.2021; 12(3): 213.     CrossRef
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    A.A. Ivina
    Arkhiv patologii.2020; 82(3): 55.     CrossRef
A Multi-institutional Study of Prevalence and Clinicopathologic Features of Non-invasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm with Papillary-like Nuclear Features (NIFTP) in Korea
Ja Yeong Seo, Ji Hyun Park, Ju Yeon Pyo, Yoon Jin Cha, Chan Kwon Jung, Dong Eun Song, Jeong Ja Kwak, So Yeon Park, Hee Young Na, Jang-Hee Kim, Jae Yeon Seok, Hee Sung Kim, Soon Won Hong
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):378-385.   Published online October 21, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.18
  • 5,141 View
  • 297 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In the present multi-institutional study, the prevalence and clinicopathologic characteristics of non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) were evaluated among Korean patients who underwent thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC).
Methods
Data from 18,819 patients with PTC from eight university hospitals between January 2012 and February 2018 were retrospectively evaluated. Pathology reports of all PTCs and slides of potential NIFTP cases were reviewed. The strict criterion of no papillae was applied for the diagnosis of NIFTP. Due to assumptions regarding misclassification of NIFTP as non-PTC tumors, the lower boundary of NIFTP prevalence among PTCs was estimated. Mutational analysis for BRAF and three RAS isoforms was performed in 27 randomly selected NIFTP cases.
Results
The prevalence of NIFTP was 1.3% (238/18,819) of all PTCs when the same histologic criteria were applied for NIFTP regardless of the tumor size but decreased to 0.8% (152/18,819) when tumors ≥1 cm in size were included. The mean follow-up was 37.7 months and no patient with NIFTP had evidence of lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, or disease recurrence during the follow-up period. A difference in prevalence of NIFTP before and after NIFTP introduction was not observed. BRAFV600E mutation was not found in NIFTP. The mutation rate for the three RAS genes was 55.6% (15/27).
Conclusions
The low prevalence and indolent clinical outcome of NIFTP in Korea was confirmed using the largest number of cases to date. The introduction of NIFTP may have a small overall impact in Korean practice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Noninvasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm With Papillary-Like Nuclear Features: What a Surgeon Should Know
    Jabir Alharbi, Thamer Alraddadi, Haneen Sebeih, Mohammad A Alessa, Haddad H Alkaf, Ahmed Bahaj, Sherif K Abdelmonim
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical-Pathological and Molecular Evaluation of 451 NIFTP Patients from a Single Referral Center
    Paola Vignali, Agnese Proietti, Elisabetta Macerola, Anello Marcello Poma, Liborio Torregrossa, Clara Ugolini, Alessio Basolo, Antonio Matrone, Teresa Rago, Ferruccio Santini, Rossella Elisei, Gabriele Materazzi, Fulvio Basolo
    Cancers.2022; 14(2): 420.     CrossRef
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    Shaham Beg, Sana Irfan Khan, Isabella Cui, Theresa Scognamiglio, Rema Rao
    Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features: its updated diagnostic criteria, preoperative cytologic diagnoses and impact on the risk of malignancy
    Hee Young Na, So Yeon Park
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2022; 56(6): 319.     CrossRef
  • SFE-AFCE-SFMN 2022 Consensus on the management of thyroid nodules : Follow-up: How and how long?
    Sophie Leboulleux, Livia Lamartina, Emmanuelle Lecornet Sokol, Fabrice Menegaux, Laurence Leenhardt, Gilles Russ
    Annales d'Endocrinologie.2022; 83(6): 407.     CrossRef
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    Kennichi Kakudo
    Cancers.2022; 14(3): 812.     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathological parameters for predicting non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary features (NIFTP)
    Eunju Jang, Kwangsoon Kim, Chan Kwon Jung, Ja Seong Bae, Jeong Soo Kim
    Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 12: 204201882110005.     CrossRef
  • The Incidence of Noninvasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features: A Meta-Analysis Assessing Worldwide Impact of the Reclassification
    Chanchal Rana, Huy Gia Vuong, Thu Quynh Nguyen, Hoang Cong Nguyen, Chan Kwon Jung, Kennichi Kakudo, Andrey Bychkov
    Thyroid.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Amandeep Singh, Jeehoon Ham, Joseph William Po, Navin Niles, Tara Roberts, Cheok Soon Lee
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    David Cubero Rego, Hwajeong Lee, Anne Boguniewicz, Timothy A. Jennings
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2020; 44: 151439.     CrossRef
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Clinical Utility of a Fully Automated Microsatellite Instability Test with Minimal Hands-on Time
Miseon Lee, Sung-Min Chun, Chang Ohk Sung, Sun Y. Kim, Tae W. Kim, Se Jin Jang, Jihun Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):386-392.   Published online October 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.25
  • 5,641 View
  • 209 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is becoming increasingly important in many types of tumor including colorectal cancer (CRC). The commonly used MSI tests are either time-consuming or labor-intensive. A fully automated MSI test, the Idylla MSI assay, has recently been introduced. However, its diagnostic performance has not been extensively validated in clinical CRC samples.
Methods
We evaluated 133 samples whose MSI status had been rigorously validated by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), clinical nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) cancer panel test, or both. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Idylla MSI assay in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, as well as various sample requirements, such as minimum tumor purity and the quality of paraffin blocks.
Results
Compared with the gold standard results confirmed through both PCR MSI test and NGS, the Idylla MSI assay showed 99.05% accuracy (104/105), 100% sensitivity (11/11), 98.94% specificity (93/94), 91.67% positive predictive value (11/12), and 100% negative predictive value (93/93). In addition, the Idylla MSI assay did not require macro-dissection in most samples and reliably detected MSI-high in samples with approximately 10% tumor purity. The total turnaround time was about 150 minutes and the hands-on time was less than 2 minutes.
Conclusions
The Idylla MSI assay shows good diagnostic performance that is sufficient for its implementation in the clinic to determine the MSI status of at least the CRC samples. In addition, the fully automated procedure requires only a few slices of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and might greatly save time and labor.

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    Luke Farmkiss, Ilona Hopkins, Mary Jones
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    Ana Velasco, Fatma Tokat, Jesper Bonde, Nicola Trim, Elisabeth Bauer, Adam Meeney, Wendy de Leng, George Chong, Véronique Dalstein, Lorand L. Kis, Jon A. Lorentzen, Snjezana Tomić, Keeley Thwaites, Martina Putzová, Astrid Birnbaum, Romena Qazi, Vanessa Pr
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    Janna Siemanowski, Birgid Schömig-Markiefka, Theresa Buhl, Anja Haak, Udo Siebolts, Wolfgang Dietmaier, Norbert Arens, Nina Pauly, Beyhan Ataseven, Reinhard Büttner, Sabine Merkelbach-Bruse
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    Experimental and Molecular Pathology.2020; 116: 104519.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of 3 molecular-based assays for microsatellite instability detection in formalin-fixed tissues of patients with endometrial and colorectal cancers
    Pauline Gilson, Julien Levy, Marie Rouyer, Jessica Demange, Marie Husson, Céline Bonnet, Julia Salleron, Agnès Leroux, Jean-Louis Merlin, Alexandre Harlé
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Cytomorphological Features of Hyperchromatic Crowded Groups in Liquid-Based Cervicovaginal Cytology: A Single Institutional Experience
Youngeun Lee, Cheol Lee, In Ae Park, Hyoung Jin An, Haeryoung Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):393-398.   Published online September 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.08.14
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hyperchromatic crowed groups (HCGs) are defined as three-dimensional aggregates of crowded cells with hyperchromatic nuclei, and are frequently encountered in cervicovaginal liquid-based cytology (LBC). Here, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HCGs in cervicovaginal LBC and the cytomorphological characteristics of various epithelial cell clusters presenting as HCGs.
Methods
We first examined the prevalence of HCGs in a “routine cohort” of LBC cytology (n=331), consisting of all cervicovaginal LBCs accessioned over 3 days from outpatient clinics (n=179) and the screening population (n=152). Then we examined a second “high-grade epithelial cell abnormalities (H-ECA) cohort” (n=69) of LBCs diagnosed as high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or adenocarcinoma during 1 year.
Results
HCGs was observed in 34.4% of the routine cohort and were significantly more frequent in the epithelial cell abnormality category compared to the non-neoplastic category (p=.003). The majority of HCGs represented atrophy (70%). Of the 69 histologically confirmed H-ECA cases, all contained HCGs. The majority of cases were HSIL (62%), followed by SCC (16%). Individually scattered neoplastic cells outside the HCGs were significantly more frequent in SCCs compared to glandular neoplasia (p=.002). Despite the obscuring thick nature of the HCGs, examining the edges and the different focal planes of the HCGs and the background were helpful in defining the nature of the HCGs.
Conclusions
HCGs were frequently observed in cervicovaginal LBC and were mostly non-neoplastic; however, neoplastic HCGs were mostly high-grade lesions. Being aware of the cytomorphological features of different HCGs is important in order to avoid potential false-negative cytology interpretation.

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  • The association of atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude a high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, hyperchromatic crowded groups and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions involving endocervical glands
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Case Study
Concurrent Anti-glomerular Basement Membrane Nephritis and IgA Nephropathy
Kwang-Sun Suh, Song-Yi Choi, Go Eun Bae, Dae Eun Choi, Min-kyung Yeo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):399-402.   Published online September 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.08.05
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  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Anti–glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis is characterized by circulating anti-GBM antibodies and crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) with deposition of IgG along the GBM. In a limited number of cases, glomerular immune complexes have been identified in anti-GBM nephritis. A 38-year-old female presented azotemia, hematuria, and proteinuria without any pulmonary symptoms. A renal biopsy showed crescentic GN with linear IgG deposition along the GBM and mesangial IgA deposition. The patient was diagnosed as concurrent anti-GBM nephritis and IgA nephropathy. Therapies with pulse methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide administration were effective. Concurrent cases of both anti-GBM nephritis and IgA nephropathy are rare among cases of anti-GBM diseases with deposition of immune complexes. This rare case of concurrent anti-GBM nephritis and IgA nephropathy with literature review is noteworthy.

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    Medicine.2023; 102(3): e32698.     CrossRef
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    Chuan Guo, Ming Ye, Shen Li, Ting-Ting Zhu, Xiang-Rong Rao
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  • Case Report: Coexistence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Membranous Nephropathy, and IgA Nephropathy in a Female PatientWith Preserved Renal Function
    Wei Qu, Nan Liu, Tianhua Xu, Binyao Tian, Meng Wang, Yanqiu Li, Jianfei Ma, Li Yao
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Fu Shaojie, Su Sensen, Huang Jingda, Wang Luyu, Zhang Fei, Yu Jinyu, Xu Zhonggao, Wu Hao
    Medicine.2022; 101(37): e30686.     CrossRef
  • Serodiagnosis of Anti-glomerular Basement Membrane Disease Using a Newly Developed Chemiluminescence Immunoassay
    Alexander Kühnl, Lea Hartwig, Cornelia Dähnrich, Wolfgang Schlumberger
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • Pneumocystis pneumonia secondary to intensive immunosuppression treatment for anti-GBM disease complicated with IgA nephropathy
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Brief Case Reports
Adenocarcinoma Arising in an Ectopic Hamartomatous Thymoma with HER2 Overexpression
Harim Oh, Eojin Kim, Bokyung Ahn, Jeong Hyeon Lee, Youngseok Lee, Yang Seok Chae, Chul Hwan Kim, Yoo Jin Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):403-406.   Published online August 19, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.06.23
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  • 1 Citations
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Citations

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  • Two Ectopic Hamartomatous Thymomas of Suprasternal Region of the Neck in A Single Patient: A Case Report
    Wei WANG, Manmei LONG, Zhichao WANG
    Chinese Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.2021; 3(1): 51.     CrossRef
Peritoneal Fluid Cytology of Disseminated Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Combined with Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma of the Endometrium
Yong-Moon Lee, Min-Kyung Yeo, Song-Yi Choi, Kyung-Hee Kim, Kwang-Sun Suh
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):407-410.   Published online September 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.07.29
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Letters to the Editor
Comment on “Prognostic Role of Claudin-1 Immunohistochemistry in Malignant Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis”
Bolin Wang, Yan Huang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):411-411.   Published online November 1, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.26
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Response to Comment on “Prognostic Role of Claudin-1 Immunohistochemistry in Malignant Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis”
Jung-Soo Pyo, Nae Yu Kim, Won Jin Cho
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):412-414.   Published online November 1, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.09.27
  • 3,285 View
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Corrigendum
Correction of Ethics Statement: Metastatic Insulinoma Presenting as a Liver Cyst
Hua Li, Tony El Jabbour, Ankesh Nigam, Hwajeong Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(6):415-415.   Published online November 5, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.08.12
Corrects: J Pathol Transl Med 2019;53(2):148
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JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine