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Original Articles
Evaluation of the characteristics of multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) infections identified using the BD Onclarity HPV assay and comparison with those of single HPV infection
Jinhee Kim, Moonsik Kim, Ji Young Park
J Pathol Transl Med. 2022;56(5):289-293.   Published online September 13, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2022.08.02
  • 1,535 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer and associated precursor lesions. Multiple HPV genotype infections have been reported. However, their clinicopathological characteristics still remain elusive.
Methods
For this study, 814 consecutive patients who had undergone colposcopy and HPV genotyping test using BD Onclarity HPV assay were retrospectively selected. Clinicopathological parameters of multiple HPV infections were compared with those of single HPV infection.
Results
Multiple HPV infections were found in 110 out of 814 cases (13.5%). Multiple HPV infections were associated with a significantly higher incidence of high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) compared with single HPV infection. Other high-risk HPV genotypes, in addition to HPV 16, were found more frequently in the multiple HPV infections group; these included HPV 51, 52, 33/58, 56/59/66, and 35/39/68. No specific coinfection pattern was not identified. Additionally, the number of HPV genotypes in multiple HPV infections was not associated with the progression to HSIL or squamous cell carcinoma.
Conclusions
Multiple HPV infections have distinct clinicopathological characteristics (compared with single HPV infection). As their biological behavior is uncertain, close and frequent follow-up is warranted.
Evaluation of human papillomavirus (HPV) prediction using the International Endocervical Adenocarcinoma Criteria and Classification system, compared to p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV RNA in-situ hybridization
Hezhen Ren, Jennifer Pors, Christine Chow, Monica Ta, Simona Stolnicu, Robert Soslow, David Huntsman, Lynn Hoang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(6):480-488.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.07.18
  • 3,485 View
  • 126 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The International Endocervical Adenocarcinoma Criteria and Classification (IECC) separated endocervical adenocarcinomas into human papillomavirus (HPV) associated (HPVA) and non–HPV-associated (NHPVA) categories by morphology alone. Our primary objective was to assess the accuracy of HPV prediction by the IECC system compared to p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV RNA in-situ hybridization (RISH). Our secondary goal was to directly compare p16 and HPV RISH concordance.
Methods
Cases were classified by IECC and stained for p16 and HPV RISH on tissue microarray, with discordant p16/HPV RISH cases re-stained on whole tissue sections. Remaining discordant cases (p16/HPV, IECC/p16, IECC/HPV discordances) were re-reviewed by the original pathologists (n = 3) and external expert pathologists (n = 2) blinded to the p16 and HPV RISH results. Final IECC diagnosis was assigned upon independent agreement between all reviewers.
Results
One hundred and eleven endocervical adenocarcinomas were classified originally into 94 HPVA and 17 NHPVA cases. p16 and HPV RISH was concordant in 108/111 cases (97%) independent of the IECC. HPV RISH and p16 was concordant with IECC in 103/111 (93%) and 106/111 (95%), respectively. After expert review, concordance improved to 107/111 (96%) for HPV RISH. After review of the eight discordant cases, one remained as HPVA, four were reclassified to NHPVA from HPVA, two were unclassifiable, and one possibly represented a mixed usual and gastric-type adenocarcinoma.
Conclusions
p16 and HPV RISH have excellent concordance in endocervical adenocarcinomas, and IECC can predict HPV status in most cases. Focal apical mitoses and apoptotic debris on original review led to the misclassification of several NHPVA as HPVA.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Joint detection of multiple HPV-testing technologies and evaluation of clinicopathological characteristics discriminate between HPV-independent and low-copy HPV-associated cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) -an analysis of 3869 cases
    Linghui Lu, Tianqi Liu, Shunni Wang, Jing Li, Feiran Zhang, Yan Ning, Yiqin Wang
    Gynecologic Oncology.2023; 170: 59.     CrossRef
  • Testing Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Malignant Glandular Tumors of the Uterine Cervix Histotyped per the International Endocervical Adenocarcinoma Criteria and Classification (IECC) System
    Máire A. Duggan, Qiuli Duan, Ruth M. Pfeiffer, Mary Anne Brett, Sandra Lee, Mustapha Abubakar, Martin Köbel, Monica Rodriguez, Aylin Sar
    Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology.2022; 30(2): 91.     CrossRef
  • Local and Metastatic Relapses in a Young Woman with Papillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix
    Ha Young Woo, Hyun-Soo Kim
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(3): 599.     CrossRef
  • Clinical correlation of lymphovascular invasion and Silva pattern of invasion in early-stage endocervical adenocarcinoma: proposed binary Silva classification system
    Simona Stolnicu, Lien Hoang, Noorah Almadani, Louise De Brot, Glauco Baiocchi, Graziele Bovolim, Maria Jose Brito, Georgia Karpathiou, Antonio Ieni, Esther Guerra, Takako Kiyokawa, Pavel Dundr, Carlos Parra-Herran, Sofia Lérias, Ana Felix, Andres Roma, An
    Pathology.2022; 54(5): 548.     CrossRef
  • Reproducibility of Morphologic Parameters of the International Endocervical Adenocarcinoma Criteria and Classification System and Correlation With Clinicopathologic Parameters: A Multi-Institutional Study
    Pinar Bulutay, Nihan Haberal, Özlem Özen, Özlem Erdem, Emine H. Zeren, İbrahim Kulac, Çagatay Taskiran, Dogan Vatansever, Ali Ayhan, Nilgün Kapucuoğlu
    International Journal of Gynecological Pathology.2022; 41(5): 447.     CrossRef
  • HPV-Negative Cervical Cancer: A Narrative Review
    Francesca Arezzo, Gennaro Cormio, Vera Loizzi, Gerardo Cazzato, Viviana Cataldo, Claudio Lombardi, Giuseppe Ingravallo, Leonardo Resta, Ettore Cicinelli
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(6): 952.     CrossRef
  • International Endocervical Adenocarcinoma Criteria and Classification (IECC): An Independent Cohort With Clinical and Molecular Findings
    Hezhen Ren, Noorah Almadani, Jennifer Pors, Samuel Leung, Julie Ho, Christine Chow, Monica Ta, Kay J. Park, Simona Stolnicu, Robert Soslow, David Huntsman, Blake C. Gilks, Lynn Hoang
    International Journal of Gynecological Pathology.2021; 40(6): 533.     CrossRef
Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus and its genotype distribution in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas
Yuil Kim, Young-Hoon Joo, Min-Sik Kim, Youn Soo Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):411-418.   Published online July 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.22
  • 5,396 View
  • 131 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
High-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in a subset of head and neck (HN) squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). For oropharyngeal SCCs, HR HPV positivity is known to be associated with good prognosis, and a separate staging system for HPV-associated carcinomas using p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a surrogate test has been adopted in the 8th American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. We examined the HR HPV status and the genotype distribution in five HN subsites.
Methods
Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections were used for p16 IHC and DNA extraction. HPV DNA detection and genotyping were done employing either a DNA chip-based or real-time polymerase chain reaction–based method.
Results
During 2011–2019, a total of 466 SCCs were tested for HPV DNA with 34.1% positivity for HR HPV. Among HN subsites, the oropharynx showed the highest HR HPV prevalence (149/205, 75.1%), followed by the sinonasal tract (3/14, 21.4%), larynx (5/43, 11.6%), hypopharynx (1/38, 2.6%), and oral cavity (1/166, 0.6%). The most common HPV genotype was HPV16 (84.3%) followed by HPV35 (6.9%) and HPV33 (4.4%). Compared with HR HPV status, the sensitivity and specificity of p16 IHC were 98.6% and 94.3% for the oropharynx, and 99.2% and 93.8% for the tonsil, respectively.
Conclusions
Using a Korean dataset, we confirmed that HR HPV is most frequently detected in oropharyngeal SCCs. p16 positivity showed a good concordance with HR HPV DNA for oropharyngeal and especially tonsillar carcinomas. The use of p16 IHC may further be extended to predict HR HPV positivity in sinonasal tract SCCs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Positive Rate of Human Papillomavirus and Its Trend in Head and Neck Cancer in South Korea
    Hyun Woong Jun, Yong Bae Ji, Chang Myeon Song, Jae Kyung Myung, Hae Jin Park, Kyung Tae
    Frontiers in Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transcriptionally active HPV in OPMD and OSCC: A systematic review following the CAP/ASCO guidelines
    Laura Borges Kirschnick, Lauren Frenzel Schuch, Maria Eduarda Pérez‐de‐Oliveira, Ana Gabriela Costa Normando, Bruno Augusto Linhares Almeida Mariz, Eliete Neves Silva Guerra, Felipe Martins Silveira, Ana Carolina Uchoa Vasconcelos, Luciana Estevam Simonat
    Oral Diseases.2022; 28(8): 2309.     CrossRef
  • High-risk HPV Does not Appear to be an Important Risk Factor for Sinonasal Carcinomas in Turkish Population: A Tertiary Center Experience
    Evsen Apaydin Arikan, Levent Aydemir, Murat Ulusan, Dilek Yilmazbayhan, Yasemin Ozluk
    International Journal of Surgical Pathology.2022; : 106689692210915.     CrossRef
  • Effect of National Oral Health Screening Program on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: A Korean National Population-Based
    Chan Woo Wee, Hyo-Jung Lee, Jae-Ryun Lee, Hyejin Lee, Min-Jeong Kwoen, Woo-Jin Jeong, Keun-Yong Eom
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2022; 54(3): 709.     CrossRef
  • Expression of p16, p53, and TLR9 in HPV-Associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Clinicopathological Correlations and Potential Prognostic Significance
    Shu Wang, Xibing Zhuang, Caixia Gao, Tiankui Qiao
    OncoTargets and Therapy.2021; Volume 14: 867.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Human Papilloma Virus in Dictating Outcomes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
    Shane Brennan, Anne-Marie Baird, Esther O’Regan, Orla Sheils
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Contemporary Systematic Review on Repartition of HPV-Positivity in Oropharyngeal Cancer Worldwide
    Amanda F. Carlander, Kathrine K. Jakobsen, Simone K. Bendtsen, Martin Garset-Zamani, Charlotte D. Lynggaard, Jakob Schmidt Jensen, Christian Grønhøj, Christian von Buchwald
    Viruses.2021; 13(7): 1326.     CrossRef
  • The Prevalence of High- and Low-Risk Types of HPV in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck, Patients with Chronic Tonsillitis, and Healthy Individuals Living in Poland
    Joanna Katarzyna Strzelczyk, Krzysztof Biernacki, Jadwiga Gaździcka, Elżbieta Chełmecka, Katarzyna Miśkiewicz-Orczyk, Natalia Zięba, Janusz Strzelczyk, Maciej Misiołek
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(12): 2180.     CrossRef
Comparison of papanicolaou smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) test as cervical screening tools: can we rely on HPV test alone as a screening method? An 11-year retrospective experience at a single institution
Myunghee Kang, Seung Yeon Ha, Hyun Yee Cho, Dong Hae Chung, Na Rae Kim, Jungsuk An, Sangho Lee, Jae Yeon Seok, Juhyeon Jeong
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(1):112-118.   Published online January 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.11.29
  • 6,131 View
  • 172 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The decrease in incidence of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma has not been as dramatic as expected with the development of improved research tools and test methods. The human papillomavirus (HPV) test alone has been suggested for screening in some countries. The National Cancer Screening Project in Korea has applied Papanicolaou smears (Pap smears) as the screening method for cervical dysplasia and carcinoma. We evaluated the value of Pap smear and HPV testing as diagnostic screening tools in a single institution.
Methods
Patients co-tested with HPV test and Pap smear simultaneously or within one month of each other were included in this study. Patients with only punch biopsy results were excluded because of sampling errors. A total of 999 cases were included, and the collected reports encompassed results of smear cytology, HPV subtypes, and histologic examinations.
Results
Sensitivity and specificity of detecting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were higher for Pap smears than for HPV tests (sensitivity, 97.14%; specificity, 85.58% for Pap smears; sensitivity, 88.32%; specificity, 54.92% for HPV tests). HPV tests and Pap smears did not differ greatly in detection of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (85.35% for HPV test, 80.31% for Pap smears). When atypical glandular cells were noted on Pap smears, the likelihood for histologic diagnosis of adenocarcinoma following Pap smear was higher than that of high-risk HPV test results (18.8 and 1.53, respectively).
Conclusions
Pap smears were more useful than HPV tests in the diagnosis of HSIL, SCC, and glandular lesions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Attitudes towards prevention of cervical cancer and early diagnosis among female academicians
    Nurhan Doğan, Gamze Fışkın
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research.2022; 48(6): 1433.     CrossRef
  • Role of Self-Sampling for Cervical Cancer Screening: Diagnostic Test Properties of Three Tests for the Diagnosis of HPV in Rural Communities of Cuenca, Ecuador
    Bernardo Vega Crespo, Vivian Alejandra Neira, José Ortíz Segarra, Ruth Maldonado Rengel, Diana López, María Paz Orellana, Andrea Gómez, María José Vicuña, Jorge Mejía, Ina Benoy, Tesifón Parrón Carreño, Veronique Verhoeven
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(8): 4619.     CrossRef
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    Dan Hou, Binjie Yang, Yangdan Li, Ming Sun
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Urine and Vaginal Self-Sampling versus Clinician-Based Sampling for Cervical Cancer Screening: A Field Comparison of the Acceptability of Three Sampling Tests in a Rural Community of Cuenca, Ecuador
    Bernardo Vega Crespo, Vivian Alejandra Neira, José Ortíz S, Ruth Maldonado-Rengel, Diana López, Andrea Gómez, María José Vicuña, Jorge Mejía, Ina Benoy, Tesifón Parrón Carreño, Veronique Verhoeven
    Healthcare.2022; 10(9): 1614.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic distribution and pitfalls of glandular abnormalities in cervical cytology: a 25-year single-center study
    Jung-A Sung, Ilias P. Nikas, Haeryoung Kim, Han Suk Ryu, Cheol Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2022; 56(6): 354.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Learning Transfer Using Simulation Problem-Based Learning and Demonstration: An Application of Papanicolaou Smear Nursing Education
    Jeongim Lee, Hae Kyoung Son
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(4): 1765.     CrossRef
  • Investigating host-virus interaction mechanism and phylogenetic analysis of viral proteins involved in the pathogenesis
    Ahmad Abu Turab Naqvi, Farah Anjum, Alaa Shafie, Sufian Badar, Abdelbaset Mohamed Elasbali, Dharmendra Kumar Yadav, Md. Imtaiyaz Hassan, Timir Tripathi
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(12): e0261497.     CrossRef
  • Utility of Human Papillomavirus Testing for Cervical Cancer Screening in Korea
    Mee-seon Kim, Eun Hee Lee, Moon-il Park, Jae Seok Lee, Kisu Kim, Mee Sook Roh, Hyoun Wook Lee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(5): 1726.     CrossRef
Review
Current Status of and Perspectives on Cervical Cancer Screening in Korea
Sung-Chul Lim, Chong Woo Yoo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2019;53(4):210-216.   Published online May 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.04.11
  • 6,590 View
  • 220 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the introduction of the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear system in 1943, cervicovaginal cytology has been used as a standard screening test for cervical cancer. The dissemination of this test contributed to reductions of the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer worldwide. In Korea, regular health check-ups for industrial workers and their family members were introduced in 1988 and were performed as part of the National Cancer Screening Program in 1999. As a result, the incidence of cervical cancer in Korea has been steadily decreasing. However, about 800 cases of cervical cancer-related deaths are reported each year due to false-negative test results. Hence, new screening methods have been proposed. Liquid-based cytology (LBC) was introduced in 1996 to overcome the limitations of conventional Pap smears. Since then, other LBC methods have been developed and utilized, including the human papilloma virus test—a method with higher sensitivity that requires fewer screenings. In this study, we review current issues and future perspectives related to cervical cancer screening in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Meeting the challenges of cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination in the UK
    Roxanne Westwood , Joanna Lavery
    Primary Health Care.2022; 32(1): 22.     CrossRef
  • Local and Metastatic Relapses in a Young Woman with Papillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix
    Ha Young Woo, Hyun-Soo Kim
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(3): 599.     CrossRef
  • Serum Human Epididymis Protein 4 as a Prognostic Marker in Cervical Cancer
    Woo Yeon Hwang, Dong Hoon Suh, Kidong Kim, Yong Beom Kim, Jae Hong No
    Cancer Control.2022; 29: 107327482210977.     CrossRef
  • HPV detection and/or cytological diagnostics
    Sanja Milenković
    Glasnik javnog zdravlja.2022; 96(3): 313.     CrossRef
  • Clinical management of abnormal Pap tests: differences between US and Korean guidelines
    Seyeon Won, Mi Kyoung Kim, Seok Ju Seong
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(3): 213.     CrossRef
  • Current status of cytopathology practices in Korea: annual report on the Continuous Quality Improvement program of the Korean Society for Cytopathology for 2018
    Yosep Chong, Haeyoen Jung, Jung-Soo Pyo, Soon Won Hong, Hoon Kyu Oh
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(4): 318.     CrossRef
  • Cytomorphological Features of Hyperchromatic Crowded Groups in Liquid-Based Cervicovaginal Cytology: A Single Institutional Experience
    Youngeun Lee, Cheol Lee, In Ae Park, Hyoung Jin An, Haeryoung Kim
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2019; 53(6): 393.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer
Jinhyuk Choi, Chungyeul Kim, Hye Seung Lee, Yoo Jin Choi, Ha Yeon Kim, Jinhwan Lee, Hyeyoon Chang, Aeree Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2016;50(6):442-450.   Published online October 10, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.07.08
  • 10,706 View
  • 213 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast.
Methods
Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers.
Results
The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity.
Conclusions
These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer.

Citations

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    Ikuko Kato, Jilei Zhang, Jun Sun
    Cancers.2022; 14(2): 425.     CrossRef
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    G. M. Volgareva
    Advances in Molecular Oncology.2022; 9(2): 10.     CrossRef
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    Erika Maldonado-Rodríguez, Marisa Hernández-Barrales, Adrián Reyes-López, Susana Godina-González, Perla I. Gallegos-Flores, Edgar L. Esparza-Ibarra, Irma E. González-Curiel, Jesús Aguayo-Rojas, Adrián López-Saucedo, Gretel Mendoza-Almanza, Jorge L. Ayala-
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    Chia-Hsin Liu, Chi-You Liao, Ming-Hsin Yeh, James Cheng-Chung Wei
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    Hua Guo, Juan P. Idrovo, Jin Cao, Sudarshana Roychoudhury, Pooja Navale, Louis J. Auguste, Tawfiqul Bhuiya, Silvat Sheikh-Fayyaz
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    James S. Lawson, Brian Salmons, Wendy K. Glenn
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    O.M. Gannon, A. Antonsson, I.C. Bennett, N.A. Saunders
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Clinical Significance of an HPV DNA Chip Test with Emphasis on HPV-16 and/or HPV-18 Detection in Korean Gynecological Patients
Min-Kyung Yeo, Ahwon Lee, Soo Young Hur, Jong Sup Park
J Pathol Transl Med. 2016;50(4):294-299.   Published online June 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2016.05.09
  • 7,245 View
  • 76 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for cervical cancer.
Methods
We evaluated the clinical significance of the HPV DNA chip genotyping assay (MyHPV chip, Mygene Co.) compared with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) chemiluminescent nucleic acid hybridization kit (Digene Corp.) in 867 patients.
Results
The concordance rate between the MyHPV chip and HC2 was 79.4% (kappa coefficient, κ = 0.55). The sensitivity and specificity of both HPV tests were very similar (approximately 85% and 50%, respectively). The addition of HPV result (either MyHPV chip or HC2) to cytology improved the sensitivity (95%, each) but reduced the specificity (approximately 30%, each) compared with the HPV test or cytology alone. Based on the MyHPV chip results, the odds ratio (OR) for ≥ high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) was 9.9 in the HPV-16/18 (+) group and 3.7 in the non-16/18 high-risk (HR)-HPV (+) group. Based on the HC2 results, the OR for ≥ HSILs was 5.9 in the HR-HPV (+) group. When considering only patients with cytological diagnoses of “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” and “atypical squamous cell or atypical glandular cell,” based on the MyHPV chip results, the ORs for ≥ HSILs were 6.8 and 11.7, respectively, in the HPV-16/18 (+) group.
Conclusions
The sensitivity and specificity of the MyHPV chip test are similar to the HC2. Detecting HPV-16/18 with an HPV DNA chip test, which is commonly used in many Asian countries, is useful in assessing the risk of high-grade cervical lesions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Human papilloma virus identification in ocular surface squamous neoplasia by p16 immunohistochemistry and DNA chip test
    Tina Shrestha, Won Choi, Ga Eon Kim, Jee Myung Yang, Kyung Chul Yoon
    Medicine.2019; 98(2): e13944.     CrossRef
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    Eun Young Ki, Yoon Kyung Lee, Ahwon Lee, Jong Sup Park
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2018; 59(5): 662.     CrossRef
Comparison of Analytical and Clinical Performance of HPV 9G DNA Chip, PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip, and Hybrid-Capture II Assay in Cervicovaginal Swabs
Ho Young Jung, Hye Seung Han, Hyo Bin Kim, Seo Young Oh, Sun-Joo Lee, Wook Youn Kim
J Pathol Transl Med. 2016;50(2):138-146.   Published online January 13, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2015.10.21
  • 6,964 View
  • 62 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can be detected by using several molecular methods, including Hybrid-Capture II (HC2) assay and variable HPV DNA chip tests, although each method has different sensitivities and specificities. Methods: We performed HPV 9G DNA Chip (9G) and PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip (PANArray) tests on 118 cervicovaginal swabs and compared the results with HC2, cytology, histology, and direct sequencing results. Results: The overall and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) positivity rates were 62.7% and 44.9% using 9G, and 61.0% and 30.5% using PANArray, respectively. The positivity rates for HR-HPV with these two chips were significantly lower than 55.1% when HC2 was used. The sensitivity of overall HPV positivity in detecting histologically confirmed low-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions or higher was 88.7% for all three tests. The specificity was 58.5% for 9G and 61.5% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 72.3% for HC2. With the HR-HPV+ genotype threshold, the sensitivity decreased to 75.5% for 9G and 52.8% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 88.7% for HC2. Comparison of the two chips showed concordant results in 55.1% of the samples, compatible results in 16.9%, and discordant results in 28.0%, exhibiting poor agreement in detecting  certain HPV genotypes. Compared with direct sequencing, 9G yielded no discordant results, whereas PANArray yielded 31 discordant results (26.7%). Conclusions: Compared with HC2, the HPV genotyping tests showed lower sensitivity in histologic correlation. When the two chips were compared, the 9G was more sensitive and accurate for detecting HR-HPV than the PANArray.

Citations

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  • Concordance of Anyplex™ II HPV HR assays with reference HPV assays in cervical cancer screening: Systematic review
    Habtamu Biazin
    Journal of Virological Methods.2022; 301: 114435.     CrossRef
  • The clinical performance of human papillomavirus genotyping using PANArray HPV chip: Comparison to ThinPrep cytology alone and co-testing
    Jiyoung Kim, Sun-Young Jun, Lee-So Maeng
    Pathology - Research and Practice.2020; 216(9): 153121.     CrossRef
  • Analytic performance of PANArray HPV and HPV 9G DNA chip tests for genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical ThinPrep PreservCyt samples
    Jiyoung Kim, Sun-Young Jun, Magdalena Grce
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0224483.     CrossRef
Uncommon and Rare Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Relating to Cervical Carcinomas
Na Rae Kim, Myunghee Kang, Soon Pyo Lee, Hyunchul Kim, Jungsuk An, Dong Hae Chung, Seung Yeon Ha, Hyun Yee Cho
Korean J Pathol. 2014;48(1):43-49.   Published online February 25, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2014.48.1.43
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an oncogenic virus in cervical cancer and most invasive carcinomas (ICs) are caused by HPV16 and 18. However, the roles and contributions of other uncommon and rare genotypes remain uncertain.

Methods

HPV genotypes were retrospectively assessed using an HPV DNA chip that can specify up to 32 HPV genotypes. We arbitrarily regarded genotypes accounting for less than 6% of the total as uncommon and rare genotypes.

Results

A total of 3,164 HPV-positive cases were enrolled. In groups 2A, 2B, 3, and unclassified HPV genotypes, 2.4% of cases with uncommon HPV genotypes (68, 26, 34, 53, 66, 69, 70, 73, 40, 42, 43, 44, 54, 55, 61, 62, 6, and 11) showed high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and ICs. There were no HPV32- and 57-infected cases.

Conclusions

We found that the uncommon and rare HPV genotypes may provide incremental etiologic contributions in cervical carcinogenesis, especially HPV68, 70, and 53. Further studies on these uncommon and rare HPV genotypes will be of importance in establishing the significance of genotypes in different regions, especially in planning a strategy for further vaccine development as well as follow-up on the effectiveness of the currently used vaccines.

Citations

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  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV69/HPV73) Coinfection associated with Simultaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Presumed Lung Metastasis
    Stephanie Shea, Marina Muñoz, Stephen C. Ward, Mary B. Beasley, Melissa R Gitman, Michael D Nowak, Jane Houldsworth, Emilia Mia Sordillo, Juan David Ramirez, Alberto E. Paniz Mondolfi
    Viruses.2020; 12(3): 349.     CrossRef
  • Human Papillomavirus Selected Properties and Related Cervical Cancer Prevention Issues
    Saule Balmagambetova, Andrea Tinelli, Ospan A. Mynbaev, Arip Koyshybaev, Olzhas Urazayev, Nurgul Kereyeva, Elnara Ismagulova
    Current Pharmaceutical Design.2020; 26(18): 2073.     CrossRef
  • Periungual Bowen's disease with a narrow longitudinal melanonychia mimicking periungual warts
    Taiyo HITAKA, Michiko HASEGAWA, Akira SHIMIZU, Yuko KURIYAMA, Atsushi TAMURA
    Skin Cancer.2019; 33(3): 211.     CrossRef
  • Detection of HPV RNA molecules in stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE) with concurrent cervical intraepithelial lesion: a case report
    Shiho Fukui, Kazunori Nagasaka, Naoko Iimura, Ranka Kanda, Takayuki Ichinose, Takeru Sugihara, Haruko Hiraike, Shunsuke Nakagawa, Yuko Sasajima, Takuya Ayabe
    Virology Journal.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pitfalls of commercially available HPV tests in HPV68a detection
    Hana Jaworek, Katerina Kubanova, Vladimira Koudelakova, Rastislav Slavkovsky, Jiri Drabek, Marian Hajduch, Craig Meyers
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(8): e0220373.     CrossRef
  • Overall accuracy of cervical cytology and clinicopathological significance of LSIL cells in ASC-H cytology
    S. H. Kim, J. M. Lee, H. G. Yun, U. S. Park, S. U. Hwang, J.-S. Pyo, J. H. Sohn
    Cytopathology.2017; 28(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Human papillomavirus genotyping by Linear Array and Next-Generation Sequencing in cervical samples from Western Mexico
    María Guadalupe Flores-Miramontes, Luis Alberto Torres-Reyes, Liliana Alvarado-Ruíz, Salvador Angel Romero-Martínez, Verenice Ramírez-Rodríguez, Luz María Adriana Balderas-Peña, Verónica Vallejo-Ruíz, Patricia Piña-Sánchez, Elva Irene Cortés-Gutiérrez, Lu
    Virology Journal.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of human papillomavirus coinfections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and cervical cancer
    Adela Carrillo-García, Sergio Ponce-de-León-Rosales, David Cantú-de-León, Verónica Fragoso-Ontiveros, Imelda Martínez-Ramírez, Asunción Orozco-Colín, Alejandro Mohar, Marcela Lizano
    Gynecologic Oncology.2014; 134(3): 534.     CrossRef
  • Human papillomavirus 66-associated subungual squamous cell carcinoma
    Jin Hee Kang, Hwa young Ahn, Miri Kim, Shin Taek Oh, Baik Kee Cho, Hyun Jeong Park
    The Journal of Dermatology.2014; 41(12): 1119.     CrossRef
Cytological Evaluation and REBA HPV-ID HPV Testing of Newly Developed Liquid-Based Cytology, EASYPREP: Comparison with SurePath
Youn Soo Lee, Gyungyub Gong, Jin Hee Sohn, Ki Sung Ryu, Jung Hun Lee, Shin Kwang Khang, Kyung-Ja Cho, Yong-Man Kim, Chang Suk Kang
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):265-274.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.265
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The objective of this study was to evaluate a newly-developed EASYPREP liquid-based cytology method in cervicovaginal specimens and compare it with SurePath.

Methods

Cervicovaginal specimens were prospectively collected from 1,000 patients with EASYPREP and SurePath. The specimens were first collected by brushing for SurePath and second for EASYPREP. The specimens of both methods were diagnosed according to the Bethesda System. Additionally, we performed to REBA HPV-ID genotyping and sequencing analysis for human papillomavirus (HPV) on 249 specimens.

Results

EASYPREP and SurePath showed even distribution of cells and were equal in cellularity and staining quality. The diagnostic agreement between the two methods was 96.5%. Based on the standard of SurePath, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EASYPREP were 90.7%, 99.2%, 94.8%, and 98.5%, respectively. The positivity of REBA HPV-ID was 49.4% and 95.1% in normal and abnormal cytological samples, respectively. The result of REBA HPV-ID had high concordance with sequencing analysis.

Conclusions

EASYPREP provided comparable results to SurePath in the diagnosis and staining quality of cytology examinations and in HPV testing with REBA HPV-ID. EASYPREP could be another LBC method choice for the cervicovaginal specimens. Additionally, REBA HPV-ID may be a useful method for HPV genotyping.

Citations

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  • High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Detection via Cobas® 4800 and REBA HPV-ID® Assays
    Sasiprapa Liewchalermwong, Shina Oranratanaphan, Wichai Termrungruanglert, Surang Triratanachat, Patou Tantbirojn, Nakarin Kitkumthorn, Parvapan Bhattarakosol, Arkom Chaiwongkot
    Viruses.2022; 14(12): 2713.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of nuclear chromatin using grayscale intensity and thresholded percentage area in liquid-based cervical cytology
    Hyekyung Lee, Myungein Han, Taejo Yoo, Chanho Jung, Hyun-Jin Son, Migyung Cho
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2018; 46(5): 384.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of EASYPREP®and SurePath®in thyroid fine-needle aspiration
    Yosep Chong, Ki Hyun Baek, Jee Young Kim, Tae-Jung Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Chang Suk Kang
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2016; 44(4): 283.     CrossRef
Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Cell Cycle Related Protein Expression in Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinomas of Korean Patients with Clinicopathologic Analysis
Miji Lee, Sung Bae Kim, Sang-wook Lee, Jong-Lyel Roh, Seung-Ho Choi, Soon Yuhl Nam, Sang Yoon Kim, Kyung-Ja Cho
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(2):148-157.   Published online April 24, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.2.148
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) has recently been characterized as a distinct subset with a favorable prognosis. The prevalence and clinicopathologic significance of HPV-related TSCC in Koreans are not well known.

Methods

HPV in situ hybridization (ISH) accompanied by p53, p16, pRb, and cyclin D1 immunohistochemical staining were performed on 89 resection cases of TSCC from 2000 through 2010.

Results

HPV was detected by ISH in 59 of 89 cases (66.3%). HPV-positive TSCCs were more common in younger ages (p=0.005), and tumor sizes were smaller in the HPV-positive compared to the HPV-negative group (p=0.040). Positive HPV staining was significantly correlated with p16 expression (p<0.001), pRb inactivation (p=0.003), and cyclin D1 down-regulation (p<0.001) but not with p53 expression (p=0.334). Seventeen cases that showed p16-immunopositivity with HPV-negativity by ISH were retested by HPV typing; HPV DNA was not detected in all cases. There was no significant difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients either in the disease-specific survival (DSS, p=0.857) or overall survival (p=0.910). Furthermore, pRb-inactivated cases showed better DSS (p=0.023), and p53-positive cases showed worse DSS (p=0.001).

Conclusions

Although high HPV prevalence was noted, it was not correlated with histopathologic findings or survival benefit. In addition to p53 expression, pRb inactivation along with p16 overexpression and down-regulation of cyclin D1 are thought to be important pathogenetic steps for developing TSCCs.

Citations

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  • Negative Prognostic Implication of TERT Promoter Mutations in Human Papillomavirus–Negative Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinoma Under the New 8th AJCC Staging System
    Hyunchul Kim, Mi Jung Kwon, Bumjung Park, Hyo Geun Choi, Eun Sook Nam, Seong Jin Cho, Kyueng-Whan Min, Eun Soo Kim, Hee Sung Hwang, Mineui Hong, Taeryool Koo, Hyo Jung Kim
    Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology.2021; 12(S1): 134.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus and its genotype distribution in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas
    Yuil Kim, Young-Hoon Joo, Min-Sik Kim, Youn Soo Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(5): 411.     CrossRef
  • Frequent hepatocyte growth factor overexpression and low frequency of c-Met gene amplification in human papillomavirus–negative tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and their prognostic significances
    Mi Jung Kwon, Dong Hoon Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Hyung Sik Shin, Ji Hyun Kwon, Dong Jin Lee, Jin Hwan Kim, Seong Jin Cho, Eun Sook Nam
    Human Pathology.2014; 45(7): 1327.     CrossRef
Expression of c-Met Is Different along the Location and Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Head and Neck Carcinoma
Ji-Young Choe, Ji Yun Yun, Soo-Jeong Nam, Ji Eun Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(6):515-522.   Published online December 26, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.6.515
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Activation of the c-Met pathway is involved in cancer progression and the prognosis. We aimed to identify any association of c-Met protein expression with a number of clinicopathologic variables including infection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in head and neck carcinomas (HNCa).

Methods

Eighty-two cases were enrolled in this study. Expression of c-Met and p16 was investigated immunohistochemically. EBV was detected by in situ hybridization and amplification of the c-Met gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Results

The c-Met protein was expressed in 41.5% (34/82), and gene amplification was found in 1.4% (1/71). High expression of c-Met was associated with the primary location of the tumor; the hypopharynx showed the highest expression, followed by the oral cavity, larynx, and nasal cavity. Squamous cell carcinoma expressed c-Met more frequently than undifferentiated carcinoma. Also, p16 immunoreactivity or EBV infection was associated with the tumor location and well-differentiated histologic type, but were not linked to c-Met expression. The patients with positive c-Met expression showed frequent lymph node metastasis.

Conclusions

Activation of the c-Met pathway might be involved in a subset of HNCa. Cases showing positive c-Met expression should be carefully monitored because of the high probability of lymph node metastasis.

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    Antonio Faiella, Ferdinando Riccardi, Giacomo Cartenì, Martina Chiurazzi, Livia Onofrio, Rengyun Liu
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    Levi Arnold, Jonathan Enders, Sufi Thomas
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    Mei Jiang, Hui Zhang, He Xiao, Zhimin Zhang, Dan Que, Jia Luo, Jian Li, Bijing Mao, Yuanyuan Chen, Meilin Lan, Ge Wang, Hualiang Xiao
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  • Frequent hepatocyte growth factor overexpression and low frequency of c-Met gene amplification in human papillomavirus–negative tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and their prognostic significances
    Mi Jung Kwon, Dong Hoon Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Hyung Sik Shin, Ji Hyun Kwon, Dong Jin Lee, Jin Hwan Kim, Seong Jin Cho, Eun Sook Nam
    Human Pathology.2014; 45(7): 1327.     CrossRef
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Case Report
Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Relevant Literature on Korean Women
Sung Jong Lee, Hyun Joo Choi
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(4):395-398.   Published online August 23, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.4.395
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma (PESCC) is an extremely rare tumor with unclear pathogenesis. A 54-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with a 6-month history of vaginal bleeding. The patient was provisionally diagnosed with uterine submucosal leiomyoma. This was followed by total hysterectomy with a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy under the laparoscopic guidance. Histopathologically, the tumor was PESCC which was accompanied by a lack of the tumor in the uterine cervix. The tumor showed positive immunoreactivity for p16INK4a. But there was no evidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) on in situ hybridization and HPV DNA chip analysis. We also present a review of the relevant literature on Korean women.

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    Tchin Darré, Abdoul-Samadou Aboubakari, Lantam Sonhaye, Baguilane Douaguibe, Akila Bassowa, Gado Napo-Koura
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Original Articles
Expression of Human Papillomavirus-Related Proteins and Its Clinical Implication in Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Joon Seon Song, Min-Sik Kim, Joon Wook Park, Youn Soo Lee, Chang Suk Kang
Korean J Pathol. 2012;46(2):177-186.   Published online April 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2012.46.2.177
  • 7,877 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). HPV positive SqCCs overexpress p16 and are associated with better survival. Several markers of cell cycles and apoptosis have been reported as a prognostic value. We examined the prognostic value of HPV status, p16, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 in patients with tonsillar SqCC.

Methods

Tissue microarrays were constructed in 56 cases of tonsillar SqCC for which we performed an immunohistochemistry and an in situ hybridization (ISH) of the HPV.

Results

Of the 56 cases, 31 (55.3%) were positive for p16 and 20 (35.7%) were positive for HPV ISH. The expressions of p16, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 were not correlated with the clinicopathologic variables including smoking status, differentiation and pT- and pN-stages. The HPV ISH positive group showed a better overall survival than the HPV negative group (p=0.04), and the p16 positive group showed a better disease free survival (DFS) than the negative group (p=0.016). Cox regression analysis showed that only p16 positivity was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (p=0.03; hazard ratio, 10.1).

Conclusions

Our results indicate that both p16 expression and HPV status are useful indicators for risk stratification in patients with tonsillar SqCC.

Citations

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  • Positive Rate of Human Papillomavirus and Its Trend in Head and Neck Cancer in South Korea
    Hyun Woong Jun, Yong Bae Ji, Chang Myeon Song, Jae Kyung Myung, Hae Jin Park, Kyung Tae
    Frontiers in Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Negative Prognostic Implication of TERT Promoter Mutations in Human Papillomavirus–Negative Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinoma Under the New 8th AJCC Staging System
    Hyunchul Kim, Mi Jung Kwon, Bumjung Park, Hyo Geun Choi, Eun Sook Nam, Seong Jin Cho, Kyueng-Whan Min, Eun Soo Kim, Hee Sung Hwang, Mineui Hong, Taeryool Koo, Hyo Jung Kim
    Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology.2021; 12(S1): 134.     CrossRef
  • In situ hybridization for high risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
    Krish Suresh, Parth V. Shah, Sydney Coates, Borislav A. Alexiev, Sandeep Samant
    American Journal of Otolaryngology.2021; 42(1): 102782.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus and its genotype distribution in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas
    Yuil Kim, Young-Hoon Joo, Min-Sik Kim, Youn Soo Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2020; 54(5): 411.     CrossRef
  • Human Papillomavirus Testing in Head and Neck Carcinomas: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists
    James S. Lewis, Beth Beadle, Justin A. Bishop, Rebecca D. Chernock, Carol Colasacco, Christina Lacchetti, Joel Todd Moncur, James W. Rocco, Mary R. Schwartz, Raja R. Seethala, Nicole E. Thomas, William H. Westra, William C. Faquin
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    Carolin G�tz, Clara Bischof, Klaus-Dietrich Wolff, Andreas Kolk
    Molecular and Clinical Oncology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mi Jung Kwon, Dong Hoon Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Hyung Sik Shin, Ji Hyun Kwon, Dong Jin Lee, Jin Hwan Kim, Seong Jin Cho, Eun Sook Nam
    Human Pathology.2014; 45(7): 1327.     CrossRef
  • Human papillomavirus-stratified analysis of the prognostic role of miR-21 in oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
    Yoon Ho Ko, Hye Sung Won, Der Sheng Sun, Ho Jung An, Eun Kyoung Jeon, Min Sik Kim, Han Hong Lee, Jin Hyoung Kang, Chan Kwon Jung
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  • Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Cell Cycle Related Protein Expression in Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinomas of Korean Patients with Clinicopathologic Analysis
    Miji Lee, Sung Bae Kim, Sang-wook Lee, Jong-Lyel Roh, Seung-Ho Choi, Soon Yuhl Nam, Sang Yoon Kim, Kyung-Ja Cho
    Korean Journal of Pathology.2013; 47(2): 148.     CrossRef
Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Gangwon Province Using Reverse Blot Hybridization Assay.
Dongsup Lee, Sunghyun Kim, Sangjung Park, Hyunwoo Jin, Tae Ue Kim, Kwang Hwa Park, Hyeyoung Lee
Korean J Pathol. 2011;45(4):348-353.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2011.45.4.348
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role in the development of cervical carcinoma. Although there is a general agreement that high levels of HPV are related to cervical cancer, the prevalence and distribution of HPV genotypes seems to vary by geographical region. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of HPV genotypes in Gangwon Province, Korea.
METHODS
In total, 342 samples were examined by Pap smear and HPV-ID(R) reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) (M&D, Wonju, Korea).
RESULTS
Overall HPV positivity was 80.9% and 64.4% in women with abnormal and normal cytology by REBA, respectively. The five most common HPV types were: HPV 16, 53, 58, 56, and 33 in samples with abnormal cytology, and HPV 16, 53, 58, 70, and 18 in samples with normal cytology.
CONCLUSIONS
The REBA can provide useful data regarding prevalence of HPV genotypes. Gangwon Province showed high prevalence of HPV infection in women. The most common HPV type in Gangwon Province was HPV16, and HPV 53, 58, 56, 70 were frequently present.

Citations

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JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine