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Volume 47(3); June 2013
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Review
Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor
Suk Keun Lee, Yeon Sook Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):191-202.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.191
  • 21,926 View
  • 337 Download
  • 27 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Differential Profile of Primary and Recurrent Ameloblastomas Among Afro-descendants and Non-Afro-descendants—a Systematic Review
    Parth Patel, Olajumoke A. Effiom, Abdul-Warith O. Akinshipo, Sunday O. Akintoye
    Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immunohistochemical expression of Ki-67 and Glypican-3 to distinguish aggressive from nonaggressive benign odontogenic tumors
    TP Chaturvedi, Kanupriya Gupta, Rahul Agrawal, PG Naveen Kumar, Jatin Gupta
    Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics.2022; 18(9): 205.     CrossRef
  • Hypoxia enhances basal autophagy of epithelial‐derived ameloblastoma cells
    Anwar A. A. Y. AlMuzaini, Kathleen Boesze‐Battaglia, Faizan Alawi, Sunday O. Akintoye
    Oral Diseases.2022; 28(8): 2175.     CrossRef
  • Giant ameloblastoma
    Muthuvel Ramesh, A. N. Gurumoorthy, Jeevan G. Sanjive
    Formosan Journal of Surgery.2022; 55(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Hemangiomatous Ameloblastoma with Spindle Cell Proliferation: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature
    PavanD Puri, Abhinandh Krishna, Suchitra Gosavi, Vivek Nayyar
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.2022; 26(1): 132.     CrossRef
  • Clinical, Radiographic and Histopathological Analysis of Craniopharyngiomas and Ameloblastomas: A Systematic Review
    Luana Amorim Morais da Silva, Solimar Ribeiro Carlete Filho, Marcelo Jales Diniz Saraiva, Caio Rodrigues Maia, Camila Dannyelle Fernandes Dutra Pe Santos, Pedro Paulo de Andrade Santos
    Head and Neck Pathology.2022; 16(4): 1195.     CrossRef
  • CDC7 Expression in Selected Odontogenic Tumors
    Zohreh Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Nahid Alizadeh, Luca Testarelli
    International Journal of Dentistry.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Fibroblastic growth factor as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A systematic review
    GururajNarayana Rao, AdlinSaroja Rosaian, Gowthami Jawahar, PHari Nivas Raj, JBeryl Rachel, PBlessing Emmanuel
    Journal of Pharmacy And Bioallied Sciences.2021; 13(5): 6.     CrossRef
  • A View of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Ameloblastoma: A Hybrid Variant
    Priya Thomas, Sapna Chandran Lathakumari
    Journal of Health Sciences & Research.2021; 12(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of a Prognostic Nomogram for Postoperative Recurrence-Free Survival of Ameloblastoma
    Yao-Cheng Yang, Jun-Jie Wang, Yun Huang, Wei-Xin Cai, Qian Tao
    Cancer Management and Research.2021; Volume 13: 4403.     CrossRef
  • Peripheral Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor — A Rare Cause of Gingival Enlargement: A Case Report with CBCT Findings


    Arun Sadasivan, Roshni Ramesh, Nikhil M Kurien
    Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry.2020; Volume 12: 297.     CrossRef
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    Laura Han, Alison Downing, David Farr, Kaushik Dasgupta, Duncan Stewart
    Journal of Orthodontics.2019; 46(3): 259.     CrossRef
  • Recurrence of plexiform ameloblastoma as acanthomatous ameloblastoma: A rare case report
    SanatKumar Bhuyan, Ruchi Bhuyan, TapanKumar Sahoo, Pinali Das
    Contemporary Clinical Dentistry.2019; 10(1): 178.     CrossRef
  • Immunoexperssion of cancer stem cell marker (CD44) in ameloblastoma
    ManjushriMadhukar Vanje, Shahela Tanveer, SyedAfroz Ahmed, Shravan Kumar, Tejashree Vanje
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.2019; 23(3): 400.     CrossRef
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    S. H. Baum, C. Loef, D. Baumhoer, C. Mohr
    Der MKG-Chirurg.2018; 11(2): 111.     CrossRef
  • Ameloblastoma Secondary to Third Molar Extraction and Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy : A Case Report
    Sung-Tak Lee, Santhiya Iswarya Vinothini Udayakumar, Tae-Geon Kwon, Hong-In Shin, So-Young Choi
    The Korean Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.2018; 42(2): 39.     CrossRef
  • Glypican-3 distinguishes aggressive from non-aggressive odontogenic tumors: a preliminary study
    Ramon Barreto Mendes, Rosane Borges Dias, Andreia Leal Figueiredo, Clarissa Araújo Gurgel, Manoel Santana Filho, Leonardo Araújo Melo, Marília Trierveiler, Patrícia Ramos Cury, Rosalia Leonardi, Jean Nunes Dos Santos
    Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine.2017; 46(4): 297.     CrossRef
  • Immunoexpression of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and their receptors, BMPR-IA and BMPR-II, in ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors
    Marcelo Anderson Barbosa Nascimento, Cassiano Francisco Weege Nonaka, Carlos Augusto Galvão Barboza, Roseana de Almeida Freitas, Leão Pereira Pinto, Lélia Batista de Souza
    Archives of Oral Biology.2017; 73: 223.     CrossRef
  • Rare case of ameloblastoma with pulmonary metastases
    Ivan Valkadinov, Nikolay Conev, Dian Dzhenkov, Ivan Donev
    Intractable & Rare Diseases Research.2017; 6(3): 211.     CrossRef
  • High strength oil palm shell concrete beams reinforced with steel fibres
    S. Poh-Yap, U. Johnson-Alengaram, K. Hung-Mo, M. Zamin-Jumaat
    Materiales de Construcción.2017; 67(328): 142.     CrossRef
  • A novel marker of ameloblastoma and systematic review of immunohistochemical findings
    Bacem A.E.O. Khalele, Rami A. Al-Shiaty
    Annals of Diagnostic Pathology.2016; 22: 18.     CrossRef
  • Adenoid variant of peripheral ameloblastoma with cellular atypia in the retromolar pad area: A case report
    Bacem A.E.O. Khalele
    Future Dental Journal.2016; 2(2): 91.     CrossRef
  • Ameloblastoma during pregnancy: a case report
    Helbert Eustáquio Cardoso da Silva, Erika do Socorro Ramos Costa, Antônio Carlos Quintão Medeiros, Paulo Sérgio dos Santos Pereira
    Journal of Medical Case Reports.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • De novo adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma presenting anew in an elderly patient with previous normal CT and MRI studies: A case report and implications on pathogenesis
    Amy Walker, Radmehr Torabi, Michael Punsoni, Edward Stopa, Curtis Doberstein
    Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery.2015; 2(3): 149.     CrossRef
  • Understanding ameloblastomas through tooth development
    Amer Sehic
    Journal of Dentistry and Oral Care.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • New Features in Mucous-Ameloblastoma. A Case Report of rare Entity
    IS Gataa
    International Journal of Oral and Craniofacial Science.2015; : 001.     CrossRef
  • Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with a dentigerous cyst: A case report
    Ludmila de Faro Valverde, Tássia Amaral Gomes, Maria Lúcia Neves, Rosane Borges Dias, Manuela Torres Andion Vidal, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer Sales, Clarissa Araújo Gurgel Rocha, Jean Nunes dos Santos
    Indian Journal of Dentistry.2014; 5: 82.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Histopathologic Predictors of Lymph Node Metastasis and Prognosis in Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Dong Jin Lee, Mi Jung Kwon, Eun Sook Nam, Ji Hyun Kwon, Jin Hwan Kim, Young-Soo Rho, Hyung Sik Shin, Seong Jin Cho
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):203-210.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.203
  • 7,751 View
  • 44 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Risk factors for lymph node metastasis in tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) need to be established to determine the degree of surgery required to achieve high curative rates. However, little is known currently about the histopathological features predicting prognosis, specifically in TSCC.

Methods

This study included 53 patients who underwent surgical resection with neck dissection. Clinicopathological factors investigated included age, gender, alcohol use, tobacco consumption, tumor stage, adjacent structure involvement, cell differentiation, squamous dysplasia, in situ carcinoma associated with primary invasive cancer, carcinoma in situ skip lesions, necrosis, invasive front, depth of invasion, and lymphatic, muscle, or perineural invasion.

Results

Contralateral cervical metastasis was associated with higher T stages and soft palate invasion. Lymphatic and muscle invasion were associated with ipsilateral cervical metastasis. Advanced T stage, invasion to the base of tongue, and skip lesions were associated with decreased disease-free survival. Advanced T stage and skip lesions were associated with worse overall survival.

Conclusions

Advanced T stage and soft palate invasion may predict a high risk of contralateral nodal metastasis. T stage and skip lesion are worse prognostic factors in TSCC and should be commented in pathology reports.

Citations

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  • Predictors of contralateral-bilateral nodal disease in oropharyngeal cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Study
    Masanari G. Kato, Mark A. Ellis, Shaun A. Nguyen, Terry A. Day
    Head & Neck.2018; 40(2): 338.     CrossRef
  • Clinical implication of programmed cell death-1 ligand-1 expression in tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma in association with intratumoral heterogeneity, human papillomavirus, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition
    Mi Jung Kwon, Young-Soo Rho, Eun Sook Nam, Seong Jin Cho, Hye-Rim Park, Soo Kee Min, Jinwon Seo, Ji-Young Choe, Eun Soo Kim, Bumjung Park, Mineui Hong, Kyueng-Whan Min
    Human Pathology.2018; 80: 28.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the eighth version of the American Joint Committee on Cancer manual to the seventh version for colorectal cancer: A retrospective review of our data
    Guo-Jun Tong, Gui-Yang Zhang, Jian Liu, Zhao-Zheng Zheng, Yan Chen, Ping-Ping Niu, Xu-Ting Xu
    World Journal of Clinical Oncology.2018; 9(7): 148.     CrossRef
  • HIPK2 Overexpression and Its Prognostic Role in Human Papillomavirus-Positive Tonsillar Squamous Cell Carcinoma
    Mi Jung Kwon, So Young Kang, Eun Sook Nam, Seong Jin Cho, Young-Soo Rho
    BioMed Research International.2017; 2017: 1.     CrossRef
  • Frequent hepatocyte growth factor overexpression and low frequency of c-Met gene amplification in human papillomavirus–negative tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and their prognostic significances
    Mi Jung Kwon, Dong Hoon Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Hyung Sik Shin, Ji Hyun Kwon, Dong Jin Lee, Jin Hwan Kim, Seong Jin Cho, Eun Sook Nam
    Human Pathology.2014; 45(7): 1327.     CrossRef
  • CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors
    Hiroki Kato, Masayuki Kanematsu, Hiroki Makita, Keizo Kato, Daijiro Hatakeyama, Toshiyuki Shibata, Keisuke Mizuta, Mitsuhiro Aoki
    European Journal of Radiology.2014; 83(3): e137.     CrossRef
Naked Cuticle Drosophila 1 Expression in Histologic Subtypes of Small Adenocarcinoma of the Lung
Sangjeong Ahn, Won Hwangbo, Hyunchul Kim, Chul Hwan Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):211-218.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.211
  • 5,554 View
  • 27 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Naked cuticle Drosophila 1 (NKD1) has been related to non-small cell lung cancer in that decreased NKD1 levels have been associated with both poor prognosis and increased invasive quality.

Methods

Forty cases of lung adenocarcinoma staged as Tis or T1a were selected. Cases were subclassified into adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and small adenocarcinoma (SAD). Immunohistochemical studies for NKD1 were performed.

Results

Forty samples comprised five cases of AIS (12.5%), eight of MIA (20.0%), and 27 of SAD (67.5%). AIS and MIA showed no lymph node metastasis and 100% disease-free survival, whereas among 27 patients with SAD, 2 (7.4%) had lymph node metastasis, and 3 (11.1%) died from the disease. Among the 40 cases, NKD1-reduced expression was detected in 8 (20%) samples, whereas normal expression was found in 15 (37.5%) and overexpression in 17 (42.5%). Loss of NKD1 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p=0.001). All cases with predominant papillary pattern showed overexpression of NKD1 (p=0.026).

Conclusions

Among MIA and SAD, MIA had better outcomes than SAD. Down-regulated NKD1 expression was closely associated with nodal metastasis, and overexpression was associated with papillary predominant adenocarcinoma.

Citations

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    Qiang Qu, Xiangdong Chu, Peng Wang
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    Clinical Lung Cancer.2016; 17(5): e57.     CrossRef
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    Tumor Biology.2016; 37(10): 14059.     CrossRef
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    Wilko Weichert, Arne Warth
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Prognostic Significance of Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression in Early Gastric Carcinoma
Youngran Kang, Woon Yong Jung, Hyunjoo Lee, Wonkyung Jung, Eunjung Lee, Bong Kyung Shin, Aeree Kim, Han Kyeom Kim, Baek-hui Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):219-226.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.219
  • 7,085 View
  • 32 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Overexpression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been observed in many types of cancer including gastric adenocarcinomas, although the exact role of HSP70 in carcinogenesis remains unclear.

Methods

The study analyzed a total of 458 radical gastrectomy specimens which were immunohistochemically stained with HSP70, p53, and Ki-67 antibodies.

Results

The study determined that the expression of HSP70 was significantly increased in early gastric cancer (EGC) compared to advanced gastric cancer (p<0.001). The HSP70 expression was correlated with well-differentiated tumor type, intestinal type of Lauren classification and the lower pT and pN stage. Negative expression of Ki-67 and p53 expression was associated with poor prognosis. The study did not find any correlation between HSP70 and p53 expression. The study determined that HSP70 expression in the EGC subgroup was associated with a poor prognosis (p=0.009), as well as negative Ki-67 expression (p=0.006), but was not associated with p53. Based on multivariate analysis, HSP70 expression (p=0.024), negative expression of Ki-67, invasion depth and lymph node metastasis were determined to be independent prognostic markers.

Conclusions

HSP70 is expressed in the early stages of gastric adenocarcinoma. In EGC, HSP70 is a poor independent prognostic marker and is correlated with a low proliferation index.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Xiaolu Wang, Li Xie, Lijing Zhu
    BMC Gastroenterology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Aftab Nadeem, James C.S. Ho, Tuan Hiep Tran, Sanchari Paul, Victoria Granqvist, Nadege Despretz, Catharina Svanborg
    Journal of Molecular Biology.2019; 431(14): 2612.     CrossRef
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    Shubhi Srivastava, Vinaya Vishwanathan, Abhijit Birje, Devanjan Sinha, Patrick D’Silva
    Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.2019; 54(6): 517.     CrossRef
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    Oncotarget.2017; 8(30): 50273.     CrossRef
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Proposal for a Standardized Pathology Report of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Prognostic Significance of Pathological Parameters
Mee-Yon Cho, Jin Hee Sohn, So Young Jin, Hyunki Kim, Eun Sun Jung, Mi-Jung Kim, Kyoung-Mee Kim, Woo Ho Kim, Joon Mee Kim, Yun Kyung Kang, Joon Hyuk Choi, Dae Young Kang, Youn Wha Kim, Eun Hee Choi
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):227-237.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.227
  • 12,243 View
  • 135 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

There is confusion in the diagnosis and biological behaviors of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), because of independently proposed nomenclatures and classifications. A standardized form of pathology report is required for the proper management of patients.

Methods

We discussed the proper pathological evaluation of GEP-NET at the consensus conference of the subcommittee meeting for the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists. We then verified the prognostic significance of pathological parameters from our previous nationwide collection of pathological data from 28 hospitals in Korea to determine the essential data set for a pathology report.

Results

Histological classification, grading (mitosis and/or Ki-67 labeling index), T staging (extent, size), lymph node metastasis, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion were significant prognostic factors and essential for the pathology report of GEP-NET, while immunostaining such as synaptophysin and chromogranin may be optional. Furthermore, the staging system, either that of the 2010 American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) or the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), should be specified, especially for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

Conclusions

A standardized pathology report is crucial for the proper management and prediction of prognosis of patients with GEP-NET.

Citations

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    Cancer Research and Treatment.2014; 46(4): 383.     CrossRef
In-house Manual Construction of High-Density and High-Quality Tissue Microarrays by Using Homemade Recipient Agarose-Paraffin Blocks
Kyu Ho Kim, Suk Jin Choi, Yeon Il Choi, Lucia Kim, In Suh Park, Jee Young Han, Joon Mee Kim, Young Chae Chu
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):238-244.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.238
  • 7,900 View
  • 71 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

Self-made tissue punches can be effectively used to punch holes in blank recipient paraffin blocks and extract tissue cores from the donor paraffin blocks for the low-cost construction of tissue microarrays (TMAs). However, variable degrees of section distortion and loss of the tissue cores can occurs during cutting of the TMAs, posing technical problems for in-house manual construction of high-density TMAs. We aimed to update the method for in-house manual TMA construction to improve the quality of high-density TMAs.

Methods

Blocks of agarose gel were subjected to the standard tissue processing and embedding procedure to prepare recipient agarose-paraffin blocks. The self-made tissue punches and recipient agarose-paraffin blocks were used to construct TMAs, which were completely melted and re-embedded in paraffin to make finished TMA blocks.

Results

The donor tissue cores were completely integrated into the surrounding paraffin of the recipient blocks. This method enabled us to construct high-density TMAs with significantly less section distortion or loss of tissue cores during microtomy.

Conclusions

Simple and inexpensive construction of high-density and high-quality TMAs can be warranted by using paraffinized agarose gels as recipient blocks.

Citations

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    Yan-Wei Cao, Yong Liu, Zhen Dong, Lei Guo, En-Hao Kang, Yong-Hua Wang, Wei Zhang, Hai-Tao Niu
    Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations.2018; 36(6): 311.e15.     CrossRef
  • Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α in hepatocellular carcinoma is a prognostic marker independent of underlying liver cirrhosis
    Jung-Hwan Yu, Joon Mee Kim, Ja Kyung Kim, Suk Jin Choi, Kwan Sik Lee, Jin-Woo Lee, Hye Young Chang, Jung Il Lee
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(24): 39534.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic Implication of Semi-quantitative Immunohistochemical Assessment of CD20 Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma
    Chang Hwan Choi, Young Hoon Park, Joo Han Lim, Suk Jin Choi, Lucia Kim, In Suh Park, Jee Young Han, Joon Mee Kim, Young Chae Chu
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2016; 50(2): 96.     CrossRef
  • High Quality Tissue Miniarray Technique Using a Conventional TV/Radio Telescopic Antenna
    Mohamed A. Elkablawy, Abdulkader M. Albasri
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 16(3): 1129.     CrossRef
Early Colorectal Epithelial Neoplasm in Korea: A Multicenter Survey of Pathologic Diagnosis
Yun Kyung Kang, So-Young Jin, Mee Soo Chang, Jung Yeon Kim, Gyeong Hoon Kang, Hye Seung Lee, Jin Hee Sohn, Ho Sung Park, Kye Won Kwon, Mi Jin Gu, Young Hee Maeng, Jong Eun Joo, Haeng Ji Kang, Hee Kyung Kim, Kee-Taek Jang, Mi Ja Lee, Hee Kyung Chang, Joon Mee Kim, Hye Seung Han, Won Ae Lee, Yoon Jung Choi, Dong Wook Kang, Sunhoo Park, Jae Hyuk Lee, Mee-Yon Cho
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):245-251.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.245
  • 8,581 View
  • 54 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The incidence of early colorectal epithelial neoplasm (ECEN) is increasing, and its pathologic diagnosis is important for patient care. We investigated the incidence of ECEN and the current status of its pathologic diagnosis.

Methods

We collected datasheets from 25 institutes in Korea for the incidence of colorectal adenoma with high grade dysplasia (HGD) and low grade dysplasia in years 2005, 2007, and 2009; and early colorectal carcinoma in the year 2009. We also surveyed the diagnostic terminology of ECEN currently used by the participating pathologists.

Results

The average percentage of diagnoses of adenoma HGD was 7.0%, 5.0%, and 3.4% in years 2005, 2007, and 2009, respectively. The range of incidence rates of adenoma HGD across the participating institutes has gradually narrowed over the years 2005 to 2009. The incidence rate of early colorectal carcinoma in the year 2009 was 21.2%. The participants did not share a single criterion or terminology for the diagnosis of adenoma HGD. The majority accepted the diagnostic terms that distinguished noninvasive, mucosal confined, and submucosal invasive carcinoma.

Conclusions

Further research requirements suggested are a diagnostic consensus for the histopathologic diagnosis of ECEN; and standardization of diagnostic terminology critical for determining the disease code.

Citations

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  • Diminutive and Small Colorectal Polyps: The Pathologist's Perspective
    Yun Kyung Kang
    Clinical Endoscopy.2014; 47(5): 404.     CrossRef
Cytologic Features of ALK-Positive Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma
Seung Yeon Ha, Jungsuk Ahn, Mee Sook Roh, Joungho Han, Jae Jun Lee, Boin Lee, Jun Yim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):252-257.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.252
  • 6,403 View
  • 28 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The aim of this study was to determine the cytologic features of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expressing pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

Methods

We analyzed the cytopathological findings of 15 cases of endobronchial ultrasound guided aspiration and a case of bronchial washing. These cases were selected based on the histomorphology of ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma.

Results

Cytology showed mucinous (81.3%) and hemorrhagic (50%) backgrounds. The cells were arranged in tubulopapillary or tubulocribriform patterns (93.8%), and clusters (56.3%) admixed with signet ring cell features (87.5%). The tumor cells were monotonous and uniform with vesicular nuclei and a small nucleolus.

Conclusions

The characteristic findings were sheets showing a tubulopapillary or tubulocribriform appearance, with vesicular nuclei and a bland chromatin pattern (p<0.001). Scattered signet ring cells were helpful in suggesting ALK-positive adenocarcinoma (p<0.001).

Citations

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  • Machine learning‐based gene alteration prediction model for primary lung cancer using cytologic images
    Shuhei Ishii, Manabu Takamatsu, Hironori Ninomiya, Kentaro Inamura, Takeshi Horai, Akira Iyoda, Naoko Honma, Rira Hoshi, Yuko Sugiyama, Noriko Yanagitani, Mingyon Mun, Hitoshi Abe, Tetuo Mikami, Kengo Takeuchi
    Cancer Cytopathology.2022; 130(10): 812.     CrossRef
  • Fine-needle aspiration cytology of non-small cell lung carcinoma: A paradigm shift
    Pranab Dey, Ratan Kumar Ghosh
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2019; 47(4): 351.     CrossRef
  • Qualitative and quantitative cytomorphological features of primary anaplastic lymphoma kinase‐positive lung cancer
    Ryuko Tsukamoto, Hiroyuki Ohsaki, Sho Hosokawa, Yasunori Tokuhara, Shingo Kamoshida, Toshiko Sakuma, Tomoo Itoh, Chiho Ohbayashi
    Cytopathology.2019; 30(3): 295.     CrossRef
  • Primary signet-ring adenocarcinoma of the lung: A rare lung tumor
    Varun Rajpal, Rahul Kumar Sharma, Charul Dabral, Deepak Talwar
    South Asian Journal of Cancer.2019; 08(04): 257.     CrossRef
  • Cytological features in eight patients with ALK -rearranged lung cancer
    Naoto Kuroda, Masahiko Ohara, Yukari Wada, Kaori Yasuoka, Keiko Mizuno, Kenji Yorita, Chiho Obayashi, Kengo Takeuchi
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2018; 46(6): 516.     CrossRef
  • Cytological markers for predicting ALK -positive pulmonary adenocarcinoma
    K. Miyata, S. Morita, H. Dejima, N. Seki, N. Matsutani, M. Mieno, F. Kondo, Y. Soejima, F. Tanaka, M. Sawabe
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2017; 45(11): 963.     CrossRef
  • ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma with extensive mucin production can mimic mucinous adenocarcinoma: clinicopathological analysis and comprehensive histological comparison with KRAS-mutated mucinous adenocarcinoma
    Yoon Jin Cha, Joungho Han, Soo Hyun Hwang, Tae Bum Lee, Hojoong Kim, Jea Ill Zo
    Pathology.2016; 48(4): 325.     CrossRef
  • Cytomorphological identification of advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma harboring KRAS mutation in lymph node fine-needle aspiration specimens: Comparative investigation of adenocarcinoma with KRAS and EGFR mutations
    Dae Hyun Song, Boram Lee, Yooju Shin, In Ho Choi, Sang Yun Ha, Jae Jun Lee, Min Eui Hong, Yoon-La Choi, Joungho Han, Sang-Won Um
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2015; 43(7): 539.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive analysis of RET and ROS1 rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma
    Seung Eun Lee, Boram Lee, Mineui Hong, Ji-Young Song, Kyungsoo Jung, Maruja E Lira, Mao Mao, Joungho Han, Jhingook Kim, Yoon-La Choi
    Modern Pathology.2015; 28(4): 468.     CrossRef
Aspiration Cytopathology of Peripancreatic Space: A Clinicoradiologic and Cytopathologic Analyses of 42 Cases
Justin Bishop, Wei Zhang, Olga B. Ioffe, Syed Z. Ali
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):258-264.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.258
  • 7,600 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The pancreas is surrounded by soft tissue known as the peripancreatic space (PPS). Pathologic lesions of the PPS are infrequent and have only rarely been reported in the cytopathology literature.

Methods

A retrospective review of cytopathology files at two large institutions revealed 42 cases of PPS lesions obtained by transabdominal fine needle aspiration (FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided FNA over a 16-year period. Clinicoradiologic findings and follow-up information were also reviewed.

Results

Patients ranged in age from 23-83 years (mean, 60 years) with an equal gender distribution. The major clinical presentations included pain, jaundice, nausea/vomiting, and abnormal liver enzymes. Radiographic characteristics included lymphadenopathy and cystic/solid soft tissue masses with a size range of 1.5 to 8 cm. Cytologically, 4 (9.5%) cases were nondiagnostic, 9 (21.5%) were diagnosed as benign, 4 (9.5%) were atypical or suspicious for cancer, and 25 (59.5%) were malignant. Six of 25 (24%) patients had metastasis of a prior known malignancy.

Conclusions

FNA of PPS masses is a rare occurrence. The majority of lesions are metastatic carcinomas from a variety of primary sites. Flow cytometry and immunoperoxidase studies are useful adjuncts to determine the tumor origin. The sensitivity of PPS aspiration for a malignant diagnosis is 90% with a positive predictive value of 100%.

Cytological Evaluation and REBA HPV-ID HPV Testing of Newly Developed Liquid-Based Cytology, EASYPREP: Comparison with SurePath
Youn Soo Lee, Gyungyub Gong, Jin Hee Sohn, Ki Sung Ryu, Jung Hun Lee, Shin Kwang Khang, Kyung-Ja Cho, Yong-Man Kim, Chang Suk Kang
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):265-274.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.265
  • 8,656 View
  • 83 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

The objective of this study was to evaluate a newly-developed EASYPREP liquid-based cytology method in cervicovaginal specimens and compare it with SurePath.

Methods

Cervicovaginal specimens were prospectively collected from 1,000 patients with EASYPREP and SurePath. The specimens were first collected by brushing for SurePath and second for EASYPREP. The specimens of both methods were diagnosed according to the Bethesda System. Additionally, we performed to REBA HPV-ID genotyping and sequencing analysis for human papillomavirus (HPV) on 249 specimens.

Results

EASYPREP and SurePath showed even distribution of cells and were equal in cellularity and staining quality. The diagnostic agreement between the two methods was 96.5%. Based on the standard of SurePath, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EASYPREP were 90.7%, 99.2%, 94.8%, and 98.5%, respectively. The positivity of REBA HPV-ID was 49.4% and 95.1% in normal and abnormal cytological samples, respectively. The result of REBA HPV-ID had high concordance with sequencing analysis.

Conclusions

EASYPREP provided comparable results to SurePath in the diagnosis and staining quality of cytology examinations and in HPV testing with REBA HPV-ID. EASYPREP could be another LBC method choice for the cervicovaginal specimens. Additionally, REBA HPV-ID may be a useful method for HPV genotyping.

Citations

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  • High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Detection via Cobas® 4800 and REBA HPV-ID® Assays
    Sasiprapa Liewchalermwong, Shina Oranratanaphan, Wichai Termrungruanglert, Surang Triratanachat, Patou Tantbirojn, Nakarin Kitkumthorn, Parvapan Bhattarakosol, Arkom Chaiwongkot
    Viruses.2022; 14(12): 2713.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of nuclear chromatin using grayscale intensity and thresholded percentage area in liquid-based cervical cytology
    Hyekyung Lee, Myungein Han, Taejo Yoo, Chanho Jung, Hyun-Jin Son, Migyung Cho
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2018; 46(5): 384.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of EASYPREP®and SurePath®in thyroid fine-needle aspiration
    Yosep Chong, Ki Hyun Baek, Jee Young Kim, Tae-Jung Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Chang Suk Kang
    Diagnostic Cytopathology.2016; 44(4): 283.     CrossRef
Case Studies
Multicystic Biliary Hamartoma of the Liver
Ji Soo Song, Sang Jae Noh, Baik Hwan Cho, Woo Sung Moon
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):275-278.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.275
  • 6,640 View
  • 72 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Multicystic biliary hamartoma (MCBH) is a very rare hamartomatous cystic nodule of the liver, which has recently been described as a new entity of a hepatic nodular lesion. We report a unique case of MCBH with a review of the literatures. A hepatic multicystic mass of segment 3 was detected in a 52-year-old male by abdominal computed tomography, and resection of this lesion was performed. Macroscopic examination revealed a 2.7×2.0 cm nodular mass with a multicystic honeycomb cut surface. Histologically, this lesion consisted of multiple dilated cystic ducts lined by biliary type epithelial cells, periductal glands and connective tissue, which included small amounts of hepatic parenchyma and blood vessels. Recognition of this unusual lesion is essential to avoid confusion with other cystic tumors of the liver, and to learn more about its natural history and response to treatment.

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  • Characteristics of multicystic biliary hamartoma: A case report
    Jia Lian, Lixia Sun, Yankai Yang, Jun Li, Ye Zhang, Guiqiu Liu, Weijuan Hu
    Frontiers in Surgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hamartoma multiquístico de vías biliares
    Victoria Carmona, Iago Justo, Yolanda Rodríguez-Gil, Alberto Marcacuzco, Carmelo Loinaz, Carlos Jiménez
    Cirugía Española.2022; 100(12): 800.     CrossRef
  • Multicystic Biliary Hamartoma With Xanthogranulomatous Inflammation on 18F-FDG PET/CT
    Nahomi Shono, Yoichi Otomi, Hideki Otsuka, Takayoshi Shinya, Masafumi Harada
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine.2022; 47(10): 882.     CrossRef
  • Intrahepatic multicystic biliary hamartoma: A case report
    Chen-Yu Wang, Fu-Yang Shi, Wei-Feng Huang, Yan Tang, Ting Li, Guo-Lin He
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2022; 10(26): 9361.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Multicystic Biliary Hamartoma Treated with Left Medial Sectionectomy
    Naomi KUROKI, Tomoaki TANAKA, Takanobu SUGASE, Syoji TANIGUCHI, Takashi GOTO, Rintaro KOGA, Takumi KIWAKI, Hiroyuki TANAKA
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  • Multicystic biliary hamartoma
    Victoria Carmona, Iago Justo, Yolanda Rodríguez-Gil, Alberto Marcacuzco, Carmelo Loinaz, Carlos Jiménez
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    Keita Kai, Takao Ide, Tomokazu Tanaka, Kumpei Yukimoto, Hiroyuki Irie, Hirokazu Noshiro, Shinichi Aishima
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    Wentao Mu, Peng Su, Shanglei Ning
    Pathology and Oncology Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Tetsuro Tominaga, Takafumi Abo, Naoe Kinoshita, Tomonori Murakami, Yasunori Sato, Yasuni Nakanuma, Kenich Harada, Junichi Masuda, Takeshi Nagayasu, Atsushi Nanashima
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  • Hamartoma biliar multiquístico intrahepático: presentación de un caso clínico
    María Jezabel Fernández-Carrión, Ricardo Robles Campos, Asunción López Conesa, Roberto Brusadín, Pascual Parrilla Paricio
    Cirugía Española.2015; 93(9): e103.     CrossRef
  • Intrahepatic Multicystic Biliary Hamartoma: Presentation of a Case Report
    María Jezabel Fernández-Carrión, Ricardo Robles Campos, Asunción López Conesa, Roberto Brusadín, Pascual Parrilla Paricio
    Cirugía Española (English Edition).2015; 93(9): e103.     CrossRef
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    Rachel E. Beard, Eric U. Yee, Koenraad J. Mortele, Khalid Khwaja
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Heterotopic Intestinal Cyst of the Submandibular Gland: A Case Study
Mi Jung Kwon, Dong Hoon Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Soo Kee Min, Jinwon Seo, Eun Soo Kim, Si Whan Kim, Bumjung Park
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):279-283.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.279
  • 6,279 View
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  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts are rarely found in the oral cavity. Most of these cysts are lined with gastric mucosa and involve the tongue. There have been no reported heterotopic intestinal cysts of the submandibular gland that are completely lined with colonic mucosa. An 8-year-old girl presented with an enlarging swelling in the left submandibular area, and a 4-cm unilocular cyst was fully excised. The cyst was completely lined with colonic mucosa that was surrounded by smooth muscle layer, and the lining cells were positive for CDX-2, an intestinal marker, indicating a high degree of differentiation. The pathogenesis remains unclear, but it may be related to the misplacement of embryonic rests within the oral cavity during early fetal development. Although heterotopic intestinal cysts rarely occur in the submandibular gland, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of facial swellings in the pediatric population.

Citations

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  • A case report of oral heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts (HGIC) and review of the literature
    Gursimran Kaur Bains, Richard Pilkington, Joanna Stafford, Sunil Bhatia
    Oral Surgery.2022; 15(1): 71.     CrossRef
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    Justin Hall, Fatima Z Aly, Julia Comer, Michael P Gebhard, Thomas Schrepfer
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  • Ultrasonic Features of Uncommon Congenital Heterotopic Colon and Pancreas in the Neck: An Extremely Rare Case Report
    Yingli Wei, Zhihao Pan, Xiaoling Kang, Cuiqing Huang, Dan Chen
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quiste gastrointestinal heterotópico en la cavidad oral
    Beatriz Arango de Samper, Eliana Elisa Muñoz López, Estefanía Morales González
    Latin American Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2021; 1(1): 40.     CrossRef
Myxoid Liposarcoma with Cartilaginous Differentiation: A Case Study with Cytogenetical Analysis
Hyunchul Kim, Won Hwangbo, Sangjeong Ahn, Suhjin Kim, Insun Kim, Chul Hwan Kim
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):284-288.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.284
  • 6,441 View
  • 40 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Myxoid liposarcoma is a subtype of liposarcoma. This specific subtype can be identified based on its characteristic histological and cytogenetical features. The tumor has a fusion transcript of the CHOP and TLS genes, which is caused by t(12;16)(q13;p11). Most of the fusion transcripts that have been identified fall into three categories, specifically type I (exons 7-2), type II (exons 5-2), and type III (exons 8-2). A total of seven myxoid liposarcomas associated with the rare phenomenon of cartilaginous differentiation have been documented in the literature. Currently, only one of these cases has been cytogenetically analyzed, and the analysis indicated that it was a type II TLS-CHOP fusion transcript in both the typical myxoid liposarcoma and cartilaginous areas. This study presents a second report of myxoid liposarcoma with cartilaginous differentiation, and includes a cytogenetical analysis of both the myxoid and cartilaginous areas.

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  • Myxoid liposarcoma with cartilaginous differentiation showing DDIT3 rearrangement
    Kayo Suzuki, Taketoshi Yasuda, Kenta Watanabe, Takeshi Hori, Masahiko Kanamori, Tomoatsu Kimura
    Oncology Letters.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Colonic Adenocarcinoma Arising from Gastric Heterotopia: A Case Study
Hyoungsuk Ko, Shin Young Park, Eun Jung Cha, Jang Sihn Sohn
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):289-292.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.289
  • 6,100 View
  • 38 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Heterotopic gastric mucosa occurs in all areas of the gastrointestinal tract including the nasopharynx, tongue, esophagus, small intestine, colon, and rectum. Gastric heterotopia of the large bowel is infrequent, and most cases have been reported in the rectum. Review of the literature has revealed only eight cases involving the colon proximal to the rectum. Little is known of the natural history of gastric heterotopias, except that. It usually presents with gastrointestinal bleeding, though other serious complications such as bowel perforation, intussusceptions, and fistula formation, are possible. Further, it is unclear whether heterotopic gastric mucosa progresses to malignancy. Herein, we describe a case of adenocarcinoma of the transverse colon arising from gastric heterotopia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic gastric mucosa in the colon.

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    Jun Gi Park, Jeong Ill Suh, Yeo Un Kim
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    Reza Shojaeian, Negar Nekooei, Paria Dehghanian
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    Eduardo Dantas, Diva Yamaguti, Kendi Yamazaki
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    Hyun-Il Seo, Jae-Young Kwak
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    Eduardo Dantas, Diva Yamaguti, Kendi Yamazaki
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    Marcela Adriana Duran Alvarez, Carla Noemi Tafur Sanchez
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    Caroline Bsirini, Pratyusha Tirumanisetty, Joseph N. Dytoc, Diana Agostini-Vulaj, Christopher Steevens, Asad Ullah, Aaron R. Huber
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    Louis J. Ligthelm, Belinda K. Bunn, Erich J. Raubenheimer, Willie F. P. van Heerden
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  • The outlet patch: gastric heterotopia of the colorectum and anus
    Abul A S R Mannan, Michael Vieth, Armen Khararjian, Binny Khandakar, Dora Lam-Himlin, David Heydt, Feriyl Bhaijee, Henry J Venbrux, Kathleen Byrnes, Lysandra Voltaggio, Norman Barker, Songyang Yuan, Elizabeth A Montgomery
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    Wen-Guo Chen, Hua-Tuo Zhu, Ming Yang, Guo-Qiang Xu, Li-Hua Chen, Hong-Tan Chen
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2018; 24(30): 3462.     CrossRef
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    George A. Salem, Javid Fazili, Tauseef Ali
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    Peyman Dinarvand, Ashley A. Vareedayah, Nancy J Phillips, Christine Hachem, Jinping Lai
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    Federico Iacopini, Takuji Gotoda, Walter Elisei, Patrizia Rigato, Fabrizio Montagnese, Yutaka Saito, Guido Costamagna, Giampaolo Iacopini
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A Case of Multifocal Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Consisting of One Encapsulated Follicular Variant with BRAF K601E Mutation and Three Conventional Types with BRAF V600E Mutation
Wook Youn Kim, Young Sin Ko, Tae Sook Hwang, Hye Seung Han, So Dug Lim, Wan Seop Kim, Seo Young Oh
Korean J Pathol. 2013;47(3):293-298.   Published online June 25, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2013.47.3.293
  • 7,141 View
  • 43 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma (mPTC) comprises about 20-30% of PTC. In mPTC, individual tumor foci can be identical or frequently composed of different histological types including follicular, solid, tall-cell or conventional patterns. We report a case of mPTC consisting of one encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC) and three conventional PTCs in a 44-year-old woman. This case genetically demonstrates unique features including the simultaneous presence of the BRAF V600E (T1799A) mutation and the BRAF K601E (A1801G) mutation in conventional PTC and FVPTC, respectively.

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JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine